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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 59 59 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 56 56 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 34 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 29 29 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 27 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 25 25 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 24 24 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 24 24 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 25, 1863., [Electronic resource] 22 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 22 22 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Dorn or search for Dorn in all documents.

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Our loss in the fort was thirteen killed and fifty-one wounded. On the fourth of March, Colonel Coburn, with one thousand eight hundred and forty-five men, attempted a reconnoissance from Franklin toward Springfield, encountering on his way Van Dorn's rebel column, estimated at seven thousand five hundred. The enemy retreated, drawing Colonel Coburn into a gorge, where he was surrounded, and nearly all his force captured. Our loss was one thousand four hundred and six. That of the enemck was four killed, nineteen wounded, and forty missing. On the tenth of April, a guerilla force attacked a train near Lavergne, guarded by forty men. The cars were destroyed, and nearly half of the guard killed and wounded. At the same time Van Dorn, with a large mounted force, attacked Franklin, but was repulsed by Major-General Granger, with a loss of nineteen killed, thirty-five wounded left on the field, and forty-eight prisoners. Major-General Joseph J. Reynolds made a raid upon the Ma