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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 59 59 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 56 56 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 34 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 29 29 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 27 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 25 25 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 24 24 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 24 24 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 25, 1863., [Electronic resource] 22 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 22 22 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Dorn or search for Dorn in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fitzhugh Lee. From the Times-dispatch, January 5, 1908. (search)
and his Life and Campaigns of General Lee is exceedingly interesting and valuable, not only to the student of military affairs, but to the general reader. His address on Chancellorsville, a battle the most illustrative of what the highest military genius and audacity can accomplish with greatly inferior numbers and resources, is an admirable contribution to history. He was a born soldier. Early became famous in conflicts with the Indians. General Scott, in published orders, says: Major Van Dorn notices the conspicuous gallantry and energy of Second Lieutenant-Fitzhugh Lee, adjutant of the expedition, who was dangerously wounded. Contrary to the expectations of his physicians, he recovered, and we find him mentioned again the next year by General Scott as having, in command of a part of his company, had a fight with the Indians, in which rapid pursuit, recovery of stolen property, and a personal combat with one of the chiefs, are all highly commended. In 1860 Fitz Lee was at