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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 59 59 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 56 56 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 36 34 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 29 29 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 27 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 25 25 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 24 24 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 24 24 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 25, 1863., [Electronic resource] 22 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 22 22 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 19, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Dorn or search for Dorn in all documents.

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Col. Van Dorn to the Texan soldiers --The following order of Col. Van Dorn to his Texan command is conceived in excellent taste, and in the spirit of a magnanimous, high toned soldier and gentleman: It is the pleasing duty of the Colonel commanding to thank the volunteer troops of Texas for the valuable services they have again rendered to the Confederate States. Being called upon at short notice to take the field, they responded with that promptness which proved how high is theCol. Van Dorn to his Texan command is conceived in excellent taste, and in the spirit of a magnanimous, high toned soldier and gentleman: It is the pleasing duty of the Colonel commanding to thank the volunteer troops of Texas for the valuable services they have again rendered to the Confederate States. Being called upon at short notice to take the field, they responded with that promptness which proved how high is the military spirit of the State, and how ready her people are to seize up arms in defence of her honor, and in vindication of their rights. It was not the wish of the volunteers of Texas, however, to fight against those troops of the United States who had been defending their frontiers for years, and who found themselves on their soil in the attitude of enemies, only because of political changes which they did nothing to bring about — many of whom had been personally endeared to them by long ass
to leave that day to garrison other posts on the border; that Major Waller, with two companies of artillery, McCailister's company of infantry, and Capt. Buquor's company, were marching on similar service. Col. Young, of the Texas State troop had reported officially to the Governor respection the abandonment by the U. S. troops of Arbuckle and Washita, and of their retreat into Kansas, Fort Cobb, it was supposed, had also been abandoned. Governor Clark, the thoughtful and resolute Executive of the State, was in San Antonic, and the citizens of the place were giving him a very warm welcome. Lieutenant Whipple, of the third U. S. Infantry, was in bad odor. He had given his parole, before being 1st loose, to the gallant Col. Van Dorn, and violated it instantly. A letter written by him is published in the Ledger. It shows that he has disgraced the service; but no doubt he proves by this act that he is worthy of any honors which A. L. may be disposed to confer on him.