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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 152 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 94 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 90 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 86 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 76 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 70 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 62 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 60 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 58 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 56 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Earl Van Dorn or search for Earl Van Dorn in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 1 document section:

elligence that the whole rebel force under Gen. Van Dorn, about thirty thousand, was then marching road from Springfield to Fayetteville, and Gen. Van Dorn, in marching northward, left that road neathus forming, in fact, four distinct armies. Van Dorn and Price being opposed to Gen. Curtis, who h, evidently intending to form a junction with Van Dorn and Price, and by so doing surround our entirhich Price retreated. G G — Route by which Van Dorn retreated. I — Spot where McCulloch fell. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Earl Van Dorn, Major-Gen. Commanding Army. headquartersThe following communication was received from Van Dorn, in response to the above: From Van Doe roar of cannon four miles in advance, where Van Dorn and Price pushed forward some six or seven th stars and bars. I have said nothing of Generals Van Dorn and Price, for the reason that I have ben history of valor, under these generals. Gen. Van Dorn exclaims: The Old Guard of Napoleon was no[8 more...]<