hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Marian Douglas or search for Marian Douglas in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 3 document sections:

4. song of the New Hampshire Volunteers. by Marian Douglas. Respectfully Dedicated to the Seventh New Hampshire Regiment. From hill-top and mountain We press to the fight; Up, up with our Banner, For God and the Right! We dare not stay weakly And trembling at home; The moment for action, For conflict, has come! chorus. The fire sweeps the prairie, The tempest the sea, But nothing can conquer The hearts of the free! 'Tis ours to keep burning, On hill-top and glade, The fire on the altars Our fathers have made. Our hearts beat together, And shall to the last; Who fears for the future, That thinks of the past? chorus. The fire sweeps the prairie, The tempest the sea, But nothing can conquer The hearts of the free! Then up with our Banner! 'Mid sunlight or shade, Before we would suffer Its brightness to fade, Amid the wild tumult Upon the red plain, Our hearts, with their life-blood, Would dye it again! chorus. The fire sweeps the prairie, The tempest the sea, But nothing can conquer
A Prediction fulfilled.--A correspondent of the Cincinnati. Gazette, writing from Nolin, Ky., says: On his memorable journey home from Washington, shortly before his death, Senator Douglas remarked to a distinguished Kentuckian whom he chanced to meet at Indianapolis, I know your man Breckinridge better than you do yourselves. Mark my words, sir; within a year from this time John C. Breckinridge will be a General in the rebel army! The result shows how thoroughly Mr. Douglas did know his emarked to a distinguished Kentuckian whom he chanced to meet at Indianapolis, I know your man Breckinridge better than you do yourselves. Mark my words, sir; within a year from this time John C. Breckinridge will be a General in the rebel army! The result shows how thoroughly Mr. Douglas did know his former friend. The year is but half passed since the prediction was made, and to-day Mr. Breckinridge holds a position as Brigadier-General in the rebel army under Buckner, at Bowling Green.
Mrs. Douglas.--Very few people indeed have been placed in a more trying position and sacrificed more for the sake of the Union than has Mrs. Douglas. She has persistently refused to entertain the proposition forwarded to her by a special messengMrs. Douglas. She has persistently refused to entertain the proposition forwarded to her by a special messenger under a flag of truce from the Governor of North Carolina, asking that the two sons of the late Senator Douglas be sent South to save their extensive estates in Mississippi from confiscation. If she refused, a large property would be taken from tSenator Douglas be sent South to save their extensive estates in Mississippi from confiscation. If she refused, a large property would be taken from the children, and, in her present reduced circumstances, they may thereby eventually be placed in straitened circumstances. Here, then, was an appeal made directly to her tender regard for them, which, if she should refuse, would work disastrously acountry and of their father. His last words were, Tell them to obey the Constitution and the laws of the country, and Mrs. Douglas will not make herself the instrument of disobeying his dying injunction. The children, she says, belong to Illinois,