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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3 56 0 Browse Search
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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 1: re-formation and Reanimation.—1841. (search)
eaven blast Bunker Hill monument till not one stone shall be left standing on another! Compare a similar scene in the Boston State House on Jan. 27, 1842 (Lib. 12.26). Collins, at Mr. Garrison's instance, Lib. 15.75, from the preface to Douglass's Autobiography. But Edmund Quincy wrote: I believe I was the first person who suggested to him becoming an A. S. speaker (Ms. Dec. 13, 1845, to R. D. Webb). lost no time in securing Mr. Douglass as an agent of the Massachusetts Society; and tMr. Douglass as an agent of the Massachusetts Society; and the late graduate from the peculiar Life of F. Douglass, p. 217. institution, with his diploma written on his back, as Collins used to say, proved an invaluable accession to the apostles Lib. 12.11. of abolition. One other glimpse of Mr. Garrison's lecturing at this period must suffice. We bargained last year, wrote N. P. Rogers in his Herald of Freedom for October 1, 1841, Writings of N. P. Rogers, p. 167. with our beloved fellow-traveller Garrison, in the Scottish Highlands, either on Lo
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 2: the Irish address.—1842. (search)
e Power, 2: 80-82. was present, and endeavored to act the champion for the third party; but he made miserable work of it. On taking the vote on a resolution condemnatory of that party, it was carried by a very large majority, though all persons were allowed to express Cf. ante, p. 62. their views. The result was most unexpected to myself, inasmuch as nearly all the abolitionists in this section of the Ante, 2.415. country have been carried away by this unwise measure. Neither Remond nor Douglass was present, but there was no lack of C. L. Remond. F. Douglass. speech-making. I have had to talk a great deal, of course, for there has been a special curiosity to see and hear me; and it is a satisfaction to me to know that my remarks have been received with much favor generally. On Friday afternoon, I started from Rochester for Farmington, Nov. 18. 1842. in company with J. A. Collins, J. C. Hathaway, and Abby Kelley, in Joseph's team. It was a very blustering and severe day, and
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 4: no union with slaveholders!1844. (search)
ties, all over the country, absorbed Ms. Sept. 22, 1844, E. Quincy to R. D. Webb. public attention, and caused the Massachusetts abolitionists to curtail their labors in the field till after the election. In New Hampshire it was otherwise, but there an obstacle was encountered domestic to the abolition ranks. Abby Kelley to W. L. Garrison. Franklin, N. H., Sept. 26, 1844. Ms. You may not be aware of the fact that we are trying to upturn some of the hard soil of New Hampshire. Douglass, Pillsbury, F. Douglass, P. Pillsbury, S. S. Foster, John M. Spear, C. L. Remond, W. A. White. Foster, Spear, Jane E. Hitchcock of Oneida, N. Y., and myself are in the field, and Remond and, perhaps, White will soon be here. The State has been most wofully neglected for some two years past, and this, with no-organization, has well nigh hedged up our way to immediate great usefulness. Bro. Rogers gives N. P. Rogers. no word of cheer, blows no bugle rallying-cry for the efforts now being
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 6: third mission to England.—1846. (search)
n slaveholders. He speaks, with Thompson and Douglass, incessantly throughout the United Kingdom ane would have been. Knowing that Thompson and Douglass were to follow me, I had more to say about thof slaves and the souls of men (Lib. 16.166). Douglass followed in a very effective speech, and was . On August 20, in company with Thompson and Douglass, he was most affectionately Lib. 16.170, 173 18.29; London Patriot, Oct. 1, 1846; Life of Douglass, 1882, p. 246. received by the aged Clarkson meeting at Playford Hall, Mr. Garrison, with Douglass for his companion, betook Aug. 24-28, 1846. n which he says, in relation to the coming of Douglass and myself to that place—I have spoken to sevBirmingham, with Thompson Sept. 4, 1846. and Douglass, where, besides a good public meeting, there perhaps on Oct. 22, in company with Thompson, Douglass, and Buffum, was another pleasurable incident of this visit to Edinburgh ( Life of Douglass, ed. 1882, p. 245). On November 4, Mr. Garrison s[1 more...]
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 7: first Western tour.—1847. (search)
nt audience, and made a powerful impression. Douglass was much improved, and spoke with inimitable ries of resolutions, strongly commendatory to Douglass and myself, which were unanimously adopted byy the way of Chagrin Falls village, . . . and Douglass, Foster, etc., going by the way of Bainbridgeeautiful grove about a thousand persons, whom Douglass and I addressed at great length, both forenoon and afternoon. Douglass almost surpassed himself. It was a most gratifying occasion to all, and gratified on Thursday last. In company with Douglass, Foster, S. S. Foster, J. W. Walker. Walker,. forenoon we have had another long session. Douglass and myself have done nearly all the talking, as an important one, and very timely withal. Douglass and I have been hospitably entertained by Haerience. Too much work was laid out for both Douglass and myself, to be completed in so short a timI intend to spend a day with dear S. J. May. Douglass left here on Sept. 14. Tuesday noon. Your im[2 more...]
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 10: the Rynders Mob.—1850. (search)
es—prayer was offered by Henry Rev. H. Grew. Grew—and I proceeded to make my speech about the religion of the country, when, at last, the pent — up feelings of the mobocrats broke out, and, with the notorious Capt. Rynders at their head, they came rushing on to the platform, yelling, cheering, swearing, etc., etc. But, after much tumult and many interruptions, I got through with my speech—then Mr. Furness Rev. W. H. Furness. made a capital speech—then an opponent spoke—then F. Douglass. Douglass and Samuel Ward—and we wound up with electrical effect. Wendell had no time to speak. But the mail will close instanter. W. Phillips. No part of this for the press. The N. Y. papers will tell the story to-morrow. The Tabernacle was a Congregational place of worship, on the northeast corner of Broadway and Anthony (now Worth) Street. The revivalist Finney had formerly C. G. Finney. preached there. It was a large hall, nearly square, on the ground floor, with a gentle descen