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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 27, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 25, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
had served as a hiding place for the enemy, was now fired by a shell from a howitzer, and the outhouses and palings were soon in a blaze. As all shelter was now taken from him, the enemy called in his troops and started back for Hampton. As he had left sharpshooters behind him in the woods on our left, the Dragoons could not advance until Captain Hoke, of Company K, First North Carolina Volunteers, had thoroughly explored them. As soon as he gave assurance of the road being clear, Captain Douthatt, with some one hundred dragoons, in compliance with Colonel Magruder's orders, pursued. The enemy, in his haste, threw away hundreds of canteens, haversacks, overcoats, etc.; even the dead were thrown out of the wagons. The pursuit soon became a chase, and for the third time the enemy won the race over the New Market course. The bridge was torn up behind him, and our dragoons returned to camp. There was not quite eight hundred of my regiment engaged in the fight, and not one half
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
had served as a hiding place for the enemy, was now fired by a shell from a howitzer, and the outhouses and palings were soon in a blaze. As all shelter was now taken from him, the enemy called in his troops and started back for Hampton. As he had left sharpshooters behind him in the woods on our left, the Dragoons could not advance until Captain Hoke, of Company K, First North Carolina Volunteers, had thoroughly explored them. As soon as he gave assurance of the road being clear, Captain Douthatt, with some one hundred dragoons, in compliance with Colonel Magruder's orders, pursued. The enemy, in his haste, threw away hundreds of canteens, haversacks, overcoats, etc.; even the dead were thrown out of the wagons. The pursuit soon became a chase, and for the third time the enemy won the race over the New Market course. The bridge was torn up behind him, and our dragoons returned to camp. There was not quite eight hundred of my regiment engaged in the fight, and not one half
rved as a hiding-place for the enemy, was now fired by a shell from a howitzer, and the out-houses and palings were soon in a blaze. As all shelter was now taken from him, the enemy called in his troops and started back for Hampton. As he had left his sharpshooters behind him in the woods on our left, the dragoons could not advance until Captain Hoke, of Company K, 1st Regiment North Carolina Volunteers, had thoroughly explored them. When he gave the assurance of the wood being clear, Capt. Douthatt, with some 100 dragoons, pursued. The enemy, in his haste, threw away hundreds of canteens, haversacks, overcoats, & even the dead were thrown out of the wagons. The pursuit soon became a chase, and for the third time the enemy won the race over the New Market course. The bridge was torn up behind him, and our dragoons returned to camp. There were not quite 800 of my regiment engaged in the fight and not one-half of these drew a trigger during the fight. All remained manfully at
slung shot, inflicting injuries which caused his death about six o'clock the same evening. During the melee, in which some fifteen or twenty soldiers were engaged, rocks, slung-shots, bowie-knives, and other deadly implements were freely used. Several of the parties engaged received wounds more or less severe, but none being dangerously hurt. After inflicting the fatal blow upon his antagonist. Whaling attempted to escape, but was out sued and overtaken by the exasperated friends of Douthatt and conveyed up Main street, on the war to the Tennessee depot, where they said they intended to lynch the prisoner, but upon arriving in front of Strother a Co.'s drug store, the latter broke from his captors, and dashed into their house; he was buried into the building and soon dragged out, and the route continued to the proposed scene of execution. Upon arriving there, the captain of the company endeavored to quilt the riot, but could not do so. He succeeded, however, in delaying furthe