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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 18 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 10, 1863., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 4, April, 1905 - January, 1906 10 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 9, 1862., [Electronic resource] 9 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 2 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 8 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 4 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Neal Dow or search for Neal Dow in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 1 document section:

prison were informed that there was a way now open for escape. One hundred and nine of the prisoners decided to make the attempt to get away. Others refused, fearing the consequences if they were recaptured; and others yet, (among whom was General Neal Dow,) declined to make the attempt, as (they said) they did not desire to have their Government back down from its enunciated policy of exchange. Colonel Rose, of New-York; Colonel Kendrick, of Tennessee; Captain Jones, Lieutenant Bradford, and others, informed General Dow that they could not see how making their escape would affect the policy of exchange. Their principle was that it was their personal right to escape if they could, and their duty to their Government to make the attempt. About half-past 8 o'clock on the evening of the ninth, the prisoners started out, Colonel Rose, of New-York, leading the van. Before starting, the prisoners had divided themselves into squads of two, three, and four, and each squad was to take a