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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 18, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 4 0 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 28, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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ceed or whether it shall fail. In the one case, the States would be federally connected with the new confederaey; in the other, they would, as now, be members of the United States; but their constitutions and laws, customs, habits, and institutions, will in either ease remain the same. Our regular Army officers, educated at West Point in a faith that identified devotion to Slavery with loyalty to the Federal Constitution and Government, were of course imbued with a like spirit. Gen. Me-Dowell, in his General Order June 20. See Vol. I., pp. 531-5. governing the first advance from the Potomac into Virginia, was as profoundly silent respecting Slavery and slaves as if the latter had no modem existence; while Gen. McClellan, on making a like advance into Western Virginia, issued May 26 an address to the people thereof, wherein he said: I have ordered troops to cross the river. They come as your friends and your brothers — as enemies only to armed Rebels who are preying
but were added as the weight of the enemy's fire seemed to require it. Towards the close of the day, as the enemy's infantry — driven from the woods by our own — fell back in confusion across the plain under the severe and accurate fire of the guns of Lieutenant-Colonel Walker and Major Pelham, some of the batteries of Lieutenant-Colonel Walker's command, being short of ammunition, and the men exhausted from working with diminished numbers, were relieved by a section of Lusk's battery, Lieutenant Dowell commanding, and a portion of the corps reserve, under Colonel J. Thompson Brown. I shall have to refer you to this officer's report as to what batteries they were, as I knew but one of them--Captain Poague's. They went in under a heavy fire, and, though suffering much, were bravely fought. Some guns of Major-General D. H. Hill's division artillery were put in at this time on our right, by his chief of artillery, Major Thomas H. Carter. As these batteries were unknown to me through t
While many found their fate in Confederate prisons, the extreme danger of signal work, when conjoined with stubborn adherence to outposts of duty, is forcefully evidenced by the fact that the killed of the Signal Corps were one hundred and fifty per cent. of the wounded, as against the usual ratio of twenty per cent. The Confederates were first in the field, for Beauregard's report acknowledges the aid rendered his army at Bull Run by Captain E. P. Alexander, a former pupil of Myer. Mc-Dowell was then without signalmen, and so could neither communicate regularly with Washington nor receive word of the October, 1862—where the Confederate invasion of Maryland was discovered The signal officer is on outlook duty near the Point of Rocks station, in Maryland. This station was opened and operated by First-Lieutenant John H. Fralick for purposes of observation. It completely dominated Pleasant Valley. On the twelfth of the month Fralick had detected and reported General J. E. B
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, Preface. (search)
he Federal and Confederate armies in the battle of Cedar Mountain, and the official reports of that battle. From Colonel Allan's valuable work, recently published, --Jackson's Valley Campaign, --I have made extracts, for which credit is duly given. I further acknowledge my obligations to this gentleman for his permission to copy those maps in his volume which represent the routes of Jackson and Ewell from Swift Run Gap in .the movement against Banks, and the battles of Kernstown and Mac-Dowell It may not be necessary to assert that I have not so much attempted to point out how the skill of General Lee and the daring of General Stonewall Jackson prevailed over their enemies, in the general theatre of the latter's military operations, as to show in particular instances how, from Patterson to Banks through Milroy and McDowell, many of the so-called grand achievements of the great Confederate General were due to the blundering stupidity of political managers in Washington acting up
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The civil history of the Confederate States (search)
to-day. Beaten there the enemy may retreat both upon Richmond and the Shenandoah valley. I may reinforce him (Patterson) to enable you to bag Johnston. Secretary Cameron to Governor Curtin, July 18: The Pennsylvania troops were expected to have joined the forces going into battle this week. I trust there will be no delay to prevent them sharing the honors of the expected battles. General Scott to McClellan, July 21 a. m.: Johnston has amused Patterson and reinforced Beauregard. Mc-Dowell this morning forcing the passage of Bull Run. In two hours he will turn the Manassas Junction and storm it to-day with superior force. Mendell to Gen. Thomas, July 21, 4 p. m.: General McDowell wishes all the troops that can be sent from Washington to come here without delay. Gen. Scott to the general commanding at Baltimore, July 21: Put your troops on the alert. Bad news from McDowell's army, not credited by me. Capt. Alexander to Washington: General McDowell's army in full retr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of Company E, Nineteenth Virginia Infantry. (search)
of Gettysburg, July 3, 1863. Condrey, Jerry, joined by transfer, August I, 1862. Carver, James C., died December 25, 1861, at Manassas, of typhoid fever. Dowell, Major M., wounded August 30, 1862, in Second Mannassas battle; killed July 3, 1863, at Gettysburg. Dunett, Thomas D., captured April 26, 1862, at Yorktown; exchanged August 5, 1862; wounded in hip July 3, 1863, in battle of Gettysburg, and captured; exchanged August 28, 1863. Dowell, R. E., wounded in hip in battle at Brook Church, May 12, 1864; little finger shot off in battle at Cold Harbor. Dowell, Ezekiel, enlisted August, 1863. Duncan, J. B. Draper, John, discharged on reguDowell, Ezekiel, enlisted August, 1863. Duncan, J. B. Draper, John, discharged on regular detail. Edwards, Tazewell S., discharged by conscript act, over thirty-five years of age; re-enlisted and promoted fourth sergeant. Edwards, Brice J., wounded in head in battle of Gaines' Mill, June 27, 1862; discharged by conscript act, over thirty-five years of age. Eastin, Granville, wounded in battle of Seven Pine
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 36. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
of Gettysburg, July 3, 1863. Condrey, Jerry, joined by transfer August I, 1862. Carver, James C., died December 25, 1861, at Manassas, of typhoid fever. Dowell, Major M., wounded August 30, 1862, in second Manassas battle; killed July 3, 1863, at Gettysburg. Dunett, Thomas D., captured April 26, 1862, at Yorktown. Exchanged August 5, 1862; wounded in hip July 3, 1863, in battle at Gettysburg, and captured. Exchanged August 28, 1863. Dowell, R. E., wounded in hip in battle at Brook Church, May 12, 1864; little finger shot off in battle at Cold Harbor. Dowell, Ezekiel, enlisted August, 1863. Duncan, J. B. Draper, John, discharged on rDowell, Ezekiel, enlisted August, 1863. Duncan, J. B. Draper, John, discharged on regular detail. Edwards, Tazewell S., discharged by conscript act, over 35 years of age; re-enlisted and promoted fourth sergeant. Edwards, Brice J., wounded in head in battle of Gaines Mill, June 27, 1862; discharged by conscript act, over 35 years of age. Eastin, Granville, wounded in battle of Seven Pines, June I, 1862;
(the legacies to the daughters being according to the discretion of his overseers). The overseers he appointed and ordered were Richard Doell [Dole], Benjamin Rolfe, George Little, Francis Moore, John Gardner. Dec. 16, 1681, Sarah Halle, aged 45, and Apphia Rolfe, aged 40 [wife of Benjamin and sister-in-law of John Rolfe], testified to being at Benjamin Rolfe's hous in nubery that night that John Rolfe deceased, and heard him declare that he had appointed and did desire his two brothers Ri. Dowell and Benj. Rolf, and Geo. Little of nubery, and his cousin John Gardner of Oborne [Woburn], and his naybor Moore to be his overseers, and take care of his wife and children, and settle his estate as they thought best, giving this reason that he was in such extremity of pain that he was not able to settle things himself. The inventory of his estate, dated Dec. 19, 1681, mentions the homeland and housing and orchard, and three quarters of the corn-mill and the meadow belonging to it—the mead
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—Richmond. (search)
, which was to achieve easy successes under the personal direction of the Secretary of War, had decided the government to detain this general on the Rappahannock. The safety of Washington, which Jackson could not seriously menace, had only been, it must be acknowledged, a false pretext for conferring the command of an army, which absorbed all the reinforcements promised to McClellan, upon General Pope, an officer as brave as he was inexperienced, who had become the favorite of the hour. Mc-Dowell's corps was designed to swell its numbers uselessly, at the moment when every interest called it to the borders of the Chickahominy. Meanwhile, a bold reconnaissance had revealed to General Lee the weak points of his adversary. On the morning of the 13th a brigade of cavalry, about one thousand two hundred strong, and accompanied by a few pieces of artillery, left Richmond under command of General Stuart. Its destination was a profound secret. Following the road to Louisa Court-house,
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—Maryland. (search)
rch upon Gainesville from Manassas, and even the possession of Groveton was no longer of any importance to them, since the enemy's army, which they had hoped to divide, was already reunited. Consequently, it was not long before Porter met Longstreet's line of battle drawn up across the railway track; he was forming his troops, whose long columns this discovery had taken by surprise, when he was joined by McDowell, his superior in rank, who was closely following him with King's division. Mc-Dowell asserts that he commanded Porter to attack; the latter has affirmed, on the contrary, that his chief ordered him not to move. However that may be, Porter deployed Morrell's troops in face of the enemy, massed those of Sykes in reserve, and finding it impossible to execute the movement which he had been ordered to make by Pope in the morning, waited for further instructions in the position where McDowell left him. The latter having rejoined Ricketts, who was returning from Thoroughfare Gap,
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