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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 10 2 Browse Search
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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 13: (search)
. . . . The marquess is seventy years old, First Marquess of Salisbury, died in 1823. but well preserved, and a specimen of the gentlemen of the last generation, with elegant, easy manners, and a proud, graceful courtesy. Lady Salisbury is but little younger, yet able to ride on horseback every day, and even to join occasionally in the chase. . . . . I became, of course, acquainted with most of the persons there; but those that interested and pleased me most were the Marchioness of Downshire and her two daughters, the Ladies Hill, beautiful girls and much accomplished, with whom I danced all the evening. I know not when I have enjoyed myself in the same way so much and so simply. . . . . [The next morning] Lord Cranbourne Eldest son of Lord Salisbury. took me out and showed me the antiquities of the house and the beauties of the place. We rode about the fine park, stopped a little to see a shooting battue that was going on, went over the farming arrangements, etc., all
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 14: (search)
nt letters of introduction, and wrote besides to London, desiring me to be presented to his venerable mother. One morning, therefore, the Dowager Marchioness of Downshire took me, with her two charming, cultivated daughters, to make the visit. Lady Mornington was a person of a decided, dignified manner, not much infirm for her agy; that she never saw such unreasonable, ill-bred people as those Americans, etc., etc. It was not easy to stop her. But the embarrassment was soon apparent. Lady Downshire, who was a little formal, became very stiff and red, and her daughters, the Ladies Hill, who were very frolicsome, found it hard to stifle their laughter withe patroness. She was then at the height of beauty and brilliant talent, a leader in society, and with decided political opinions. Before going to the ball Lady Downshire called at Lady Mornington's, and Mr. Ticknor went in with her and her daughters. While they were there, the Duke of Wellington came in; and, being asked if h
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
chstein, Baroness, 471. D'Israeli, I., 62. Dissen, Professor, 70, 95, 115, 121. D'Ivernois, Sir, Francis, 153, 155. Don, General, Sir George, 235 and note. Don Quixote, 186, 223. Douglas, Lady, 180. Downie, Sir, John, 238, 240, 241. Downshire, Dowager-Marchioness of, 258, 295, 296. Downshire, Marquess of, 296. Doyle, Francis Hastings, 447. Doyle, Miss, 447. Doyle, Sir, Francis, 442, 446, 447. Draveil Chateau, visits, 146-148. Dresden Gallery, 109, 468. Dresden, visits,Downshire, Marquess of, 296. Doyle, Francis Hastings, 447. Doyle, Miss, 447. Doyle, Sir, Francis, 442, 446, 447. Draveil Chateau, visits, 146-148. Dresden Gallery, 109, 468. Dresden, visits, 109, 456-489. Drew, Mrs., 180. Dublin, visits, 419. Dumont, M., 154, 430. Dundas, Dr., 440, 444. Duras, Duc de, 253. Duras, Duchesse de, 253, 254, 255 and note, 256, 258-23, 304. Duval, Judge, 39. Dwight, Miss, Anna, 398. Dwight, Miss, Catherine, death of, 456. E Ebrington, Viscount and Viscountess, 269. Eckhardstein, Baron, 177. Edgeworth, Miss, Honora, 427. Edgeworth, Miss, Maria, letter from, 388; opinion of Mr. Ticknor, 392; visit to, 426-432, 446, 458. Edgewor