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aw of nations, who seek the protection of the Government, are called upon to take the oath of allegiance in such form as may be prescribed, sacrificing to the public good, and the restoration of public peace, whatever scruples may be suggested by incidental considerations. The oath of allegiance, administered and received in good faith, is the test of unconditional fealty to the Government and all its measures, and cannot be materially strengthened or impaired by the language in which it is clothed. XXV. The amnesty offered for the past, is conditioned upon an unreserved loyalty for the future, and this condition will be enforced with an iron hand. Whoever is indifferent or hostile, must choose between the liberty which foreign lands afford, the poverty of the rebel States, and the innumerable and inappreciable blessings which our Government confers upon its people. May God preserve the union of the States! By order of Major-General Banks. George B. Drake, A. A. General.
so crippled as to make it necessary for him to stop. On the eighteenth, a forage team sent out by the quartermaster was captured by the enemy. This was the first disaster during the expedition. On the twentieth, a supply-train arrived from Pine Bluff, and on the twenty-second the empty train was sent back, escorted by a brigade of infantry, four pieces of artillery, and a proper proportion of cavalry. On the twenty-fifth, news was received that the train had been captured, and Lieutenant-Colonel Drake, of the Seventy-seventh Ohio, who was in command, was mortally wounded. Deserters, prisoners, spies, and scouts, who came or were brought in, gave information that rendered it certain that Kirby Smith, in person, with reinforcements of eight thousand infantry, had joined Price and were advancing. Taking all these things into consideration, the scarcity of forage, the difficulty of keeping open a line for supplies, and that the rebels could avoid a battle and go round Camden, Gen