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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 70 14 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 69 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 48 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 11 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 12 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 10 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 9 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 2 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 14.55 (search)
with. The vessel near the shoal, to the south, was probably the Pocahontas, commanded by Percival Drayton, brother of the general in command of the Confederate forces; she only crossed the bar abouheir pieces. On the afternoon of the 8th General Sherman made a reconnoissance, on Captain Percival Drayton, Commander of the U. S. Steamer Pocahontas at Port Royal-brother of the Commander of the Confederate forces. From a photograph. General Drayton thus describes the resistance made to the attack of the Union fleet, referring at the outset to the first shot from Fort Walker: The shelair rather than the manly pluck of the true soldier. Of the attack upon Fort Beauregard, General Drayton says: The attack upon the fort, though not so concentrated and heavy as that upon Walker, wivered to the only white man found, who sat in the. post-office and seemed quite dazed. At General Drayton's headquarters was found a chart of the coast, and, in red-pencil marks, a very valuable ad
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Port Royal, November 7th, 1861. (search)
. The Union fleet, Flag-Officer S. F. Du Pont, commanding. Captain Charles Henry Davis, Fleet-Captain. Flag-ship: frigate Wabash (2 10-inch, 28 9-inch, 14 8-inch, 2 12-pounders), Commander C. R. P. Rodgers; sidewheel steamer Susquehanna (15 8-inch, 1 24-pounder, 2 12-pounders), Captain J. L. Lardner; sloop Mohican (2 11-inch, 4 32-pounders, I 12-pounder), Commander S. W. Godon; Seminole (1 11-inch, 4 32-pounders), Commander J. P. Gillis; Pocahontas (1 10-inch, 4 32-pounders), Commander Percival Drayton; Pawnee (8 9-inch, 2 12-pounders), Lieutenant R. H. Wyman; gun-boats Unadilla, Lieutenant Napoleon Collins; Seneca, Lieutenant Daniel Ammen; Ottawa, Lieutenant T. H. Stevens; Pembina, Lieutenant J. P. Bankhead (each of the four latter carried 1 11-inch, 1 20-pounder rifle, and 2 24-pounders); sailing sloop Vandalia (4 8-inch, 16 32-pounders, 1 12-pounder), Commander F. S. Haggerty; steamer Bienville (8 32--pounders, 1 30-pounder rifle), Commander Charles Steedman; Augusta (8 32-pou
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Brooklyn at the passage of the forts. (search)
e officers who had the good fortune to be immediately associated with him seemed to worship him. He had determination and dash in execution, but in planning and organizing he appeared to want method. He showed me one day an old envelope containing memoranda, and said that that was all the record or books that he kept. He had, however, the good fortune to have on his staff two of the best organizers and administrators of detail in the service,--Captains Henry H. Bell at New Orleans and Percival Drayton at Mobile. On the 15th of March we began to congregate at the Head of the Passes, and at this time the energy and activity of the flag-officer made themselves felt. We lay here several weeks preparing our ships for the coming action, drilling the crews, firing at targets, and getting in provisions and coal. Farragut was about the fleet from early dawn until dark, and if any officers or men had not spontaneous enthusiasm he certainly infused it into them. I have been on the morning
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
the weight of his official name,--that the rope obstructions in the channel fouled the screws of the iron-clads, was entirely erroneous. Not one of the iron-clads ever approached nearer than 600 yards to any of these obstructions, with the exception of the Keokuk, which dropped in to about 300 yards of them before being able to get under way again. The first shot was fired at 3 o'clock P. M. It came from Fort Moultrie, and was aimed at the Weehawken. No heed was taken of it. Captain Percival Drayton, of the Passaic, second in line, reported that the opening shots came from Fort Moultrie and the batteries on Sullivan's Island, and that his vessel replied to them in passing and pushed on for Sumter.--editors. The turreted iron-clad kept on her way until within fourteen. hundred yards of Fort Sumter, when she paused a moment and opened fire on it. Fully two minutes elapsed, and then Sumter replied, firing by battery. The other monitors now steamed up, taking their respective posi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Minor operations of the South Atlantic squadron under Du Pont. (search)
rolina, Georgia, and Florida, from Bull's Bay to Fernandina. Detachments of vessels under Commander Drayton visited the inlets to the northward, including St. Helena Sound and the North and South Ednot land, as he had no force of troops to hold the city. Toward the end of the same month Commander Drayton, in consequence of information given by the pilot Smalls, ascended the Stono River with a rotracted attack was made on the fort by the monitors Passaic, Patapsco, and Nahant, under Commander Drayton. The bombardment lasted eight hours, but, as Drayton said in his report, no injury was doDrayton said in his report, no injury was done which a good night's work would not repair. After Drayton's bombardment, all attempts on Fort McAllister were abandoned, and the efforts of the squadron were directed wholly to the attack on ChDrayton's bombardment, all attempts on Fort McAllister were abandoned, and the efforts of the squadron were directed wholly to the attack on Charleston. The only event of importance during the remainder of Du Pont's command was the capture of the Confederate iron-clad Atlanta. This vessel, formerly known as the Fingal, an English blocka
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Du Pont's attack at Charleston. (search)
t commanding officers in it who were available for the great work he had so much at heart. Percival Drayton, John Rodgers, Worden, Ammen, George Rodgers, Fairfax, Downes, and Rhind were chosen for thsirous to measure the iron-clads against forts on obstructed channels, Admiral Du Pont sent Captain Drayton with the Passaic, accompanied by the Patapsco, Commander Ammen, and the Nahant, Commander Dir anchorage, in the following order: the Weehawken, Captain John Rodgers; the Passaic, Captain Percival Drayton; the Montauk, Captain John L. Worden; Patapsco, Commander Daniel Ammen; New Ironsides, ts confidence when he decided not to attempt to force the obstructions. He was followed by Percival Drayton, Farragut's trusted and well-tried chief-of-staff, by John Worden, of monitor fame, and by so far repaired that it could be revolved, although for a time irregularly. In his report, Captain Drayton says, A little after, a very heavy rifle-shot struck the upper edge of the turret, broke al
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.7 (search)
ur, 1 30-pounder Parrott pivot, 1 20-pounder Parrott pivot, 2 12-pounder heavy howitzers; Stettin, Act. Master C. J. Van Alstine, 1 30-pounder Parrott pivot, 4 24-pounder S. B. howitzers; Uncas, Act. Master William Watson, 4 32-pounders, 1 20-pounder Parrott; Memphis, Lieut.-Com. P. G. Watmough, Act. Master C. A. Curtis, 4 24-pounder S. B. howitzers, 1 30-pounder Parrott rifle, 2 12-pounder rifle howitzers. Monitors. (1 15-inch, 1 11-inch, each.) Patapsco, Com. D. Ammen; Passaic, Captain P. Drayton; Nahant, Com. John Downes; Montauk, Com. John L. Worden, Com. D. M. Fairfax; Nantucket, Com. D. M. Fairfax, Lieut.-Com. L. H. Newman, Com. J. C. Beaumont; Weehawken, Captain John Rodgers; Catskill, Com. George W. Rodgers. Other iron-clads. Keokuk, Com. A. C. Rhind, 2 11-inch. S. B.; New Ironsides, Com. T. Turner, 14 11-inch, 2 150-pounder Parrotts, 2 50-pounder Dahlgrens. Sailing vessels (Barks). Kingfisher, Act. Master J. C. Dutch, 4 8-inch; Braziliera, Act. Master W. T. G
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 7.51 (search)
n emergency, could flash fire and fury. Next in prominence to the admiral was the tall, commanding form of Fleet-Captain Percival Drayton, the man of all men to be Farragut's chief-of-staff, gentlemanly and courteous to all, but thoughtful and reselow. Seeing the admiral in this exposed position, where, if wounded, he would be killed by falling to the deck, Fleet-Captain Drayton ordered Knowles, the signal-quartermaster, to fasten a rope around him so that he would be prevented from fallingt any such move was made, but it was witnessed by the entire fleet, and is mentioned by both Admiral Farragut and Fleet-Captain Drayton in their official reports. See Captain Johnston's account, p. 4:01. editors. The Hartford had now run a mias twice lashed to the rigging, each time by devoted officers who knew better than to consult him before acting. Fleet-Captain Drayton had hurried to the bow of the Hartford as the collision was seen to be inevitable, and expressed keen satisfactio
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Mobile. (search)
The opposing forces at Mobile. The Union fleet in the battle of Mobile Bay. Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding. Fleet-Captain, Captain Percival Drayton. Monitors. Tecumseh, Com. T. A. M. Craven, 2 15-inch guns; Manhattan, Com. J. W. A. Nicholson, 2 15-inch; Winnebago, Com. Thomas H. Stevens, 4 11-inch; Chickasaw, Lieut.-Com. George H. Perkins, 411-inch. Screw-sloops. Hartford (flag-ship), Capt. Percival Drayton, 2 100-pounder Parrott rifles, 1 30-pounder Parrott, 18 9-inchCapt. Percival Drayton, 2 100-pounder Parrott rifles, 1 30-pounder Parrott, 18 9-inch, 3 howitzers; Brooklyn, Capt. James Alden, 2 100-pounder Parrotts, 2 60-pounder rifles, 20 9-inch, 1 howitzer; Richmond, Capt. Thornton A. Jenkins, 1 100-pounder rifle, 1 30-pounder rifle, 18 9-inch, 2 howitzers; Lackawanna, Capt. J. B. Marchand, 1150-pounder Parrott pivot, 1 50-pounder Dahlgren pivot, 2 11-inch, 4 9-inch, 6 howitzers; Monongahela, Com. James H. Strong, 1 150-pounder Parrott, 2 11-inch, 5 32-pounders, 3 howitzers; Ossipee, Com. William E. Le Roy, 1 100-pounder Parrott, 1 11-inc
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The ram Tennessee at Mobile Bay. (search)
s own. I remained on board six days, during which time I was visited by nearly all the commanding officers of the fleet. Within an hour after I was taken on board the Ossipee Admiral Farragut sent for me to be brought on board his flag-ship, and when I reached her deck he expressed regret at meeting me under such circumstances, to which I replied that he was not half as sorry to see me as I was to see him. Surrender of the Tennessee. from a War-time sketch. His flag-captain, Percival Drayton, remarked, You have one consolation, Johnston; no one can say that you have not nobly defended the honor of the Confederate flag to-day. I thanked him, but gave all the honor due to its defense to Admiral Buchanan, who was the true hero of the battle; and when the disparity between the forces engaged is duly considered, I am constrained to believe that history will give him his just meed of praise. The casualties on board the Tennessee were two killed and nine wounded. Her armor was
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