hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 70 14 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 69 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 48 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 24 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 23 11 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 12 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 10 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 9 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Percival Drayton or search for Percival Drayton in all documents.

Your search returned 37 results in 8 document sections:

Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: the Port Royal expedition. (search)
f noting an explosion at Bay Point, which General Drayton stated in his report to have been caused the battle and abandonment of Port Royal, General Drayton, who commanded the Confederate forces, sas added the enfilading fire, described by General Drayton as follows: Besides this moving battery, st their way, and had not yet come up. General Drayton was misinformed as to a steamer and boatsHatteras Inlet! At the headquarters of General Drayton a chart of the coast was found on which wwith the same objects and like results. Commander Drayton in the Pawnee, to which he had been trand were taken on board of the vessels. Commander Drayton, with the Pembina and Vixen, some four mr further orders, on the 5th of December Commander Drayton again revisited those waters in the Pawnof the vessels. The following morning Commander Drayton went up the Coosaw River with his commanll far short. On the 15th of December Commander Drayton crossed the North Edisto Bar. An earthwo[11 more...]
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: strategic Reconnoissances. (search)
nce detached a force of light-draught vessels, under Commander Drayton in the Pawnee, from those that entered the Sound in l second with the marine battalion, Major Reynolds. Commander Drayton proceeded with the vessels that had succeeded in cros an armed launch was left to guard the drawbridge, and Captain Drayton returned to the Pawnee, which had been left aground. nfederate soldiers vanished, and the fire was put out. Captain Drayton reported: The batteries on and near Fort Clinch on there. The Pawnee ascended to Legareville; from thence Captain Drayton in the Ottawa, a smaller vessel than his own command, The removal of a few piles from an obstruction enabled Captain Drayton to bring the Pawnee up the river, which he did, with tccompanying, as far as Newtown Creek. From that point Captain Drayton continued on in the Ellen, and rounding a point they wormation as was thus obtainable. Contrabands informed Captain Drayton that torpedoes had been laid in the river above. He a
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: raid of the Confederate ironclads off Charles-Ton.—attack on Fort M'Allister. (search)
entering on more important operations, and as well to give the officers and men the advantage of target practice with their new ordnance; he therefore ordered such vessels as were available to a renewed attack. They were the Passaic, Captain Percival Drayton; the Patapsco, Commander Daniel Ammen; and the Nahant, Commander John Downes, aided by three mortar schooners throwing Xiii-inch shells. Captain Drayton reported that on March 3d the bombardment had been maintained for eight hours by Captain Drayton reported that on March 3d the bombardment had been maintained for eight hours by these vessels, the Passaic squarely in front of the fort, upon which seven guns were mounted, protected from an enfilading fire by high traverses. Owing to the slowness of the fire from the monitors, the men in the fort never exposed themselves, usually discharging their pieces while the vessels were loading, or just before the ports came into line. The row of piles and depth of water did not permit a nearer approach to the fort, which was found by spirit-level and necessary elevations to be
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: naval attack on Charleston. (search)
t was formed of very heavy timbers crossing at right angles, bolted together, about fifty feet in length, shaped not unlike a boot-jack, the bows of the vessel propelling within the notch. The after-ends or jaws of the raft were secured by chains to the bow of the vessel. The wave-motion acting on this cumbrous mass was quite different from that of the monitor. It proved to be a battering ram, and loosened the armor plating on the bows of the Weehawken. led the line; the Passaic, Captain Percival Drayton; the Montauk, Captain John L. Worden; the Patapsco, Commander Daniel Ammen; the New Ironsides, Commodore Thomas Turner (as flag-ship), followed by the Catskill, Commander George W. Rodgers; the Nantucket, Commander D. M. Fairfax; the Nahant, Commander John Downes, and the Keokuk, Commander A. C. Rhind. The vessels were ordered to pass without returning the fire from batteries on Morris Island; when within easy range of Fort Sumter they were to open upon it, and take position to t
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: the Monitor class of vessels. (search)
the requirement of the Navy Department, all of the officers commanding monitors near Charleston (five in number) submitted their opinion in relation to the qualities of that class, which the Department did not think worth while to give to the public in its Report on Armored Vessels, 1864, made under a Congressional resolution. It might be supposed that this letter had been inadvertently passed over, had it not been that on page 603 Captain Ericsson comments upon one of its paragraphs. Captains Drayton and Worden subsequently saw the letter, and concurred in its contents. It has never been published, and for lack of space is not now given. The closing paragraphs are as follows: In relation to the qualities of the vessels, we would remark that they have been exaggerated into vessels capable of keeping the seas and making long voyages alone. Some of us have been in heavy gales in them, and, indeed, from the amount of water in them, have had grave apprehensions of their loss.
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: operations against Charleston. (search)
idea that either Admiral Dupont or Admiral Dahlgren should have gone to Charleston or made the attempt, the pages of the Memoir may enlighten him. Bearing in mind that the Department did not think it worth while to give publicity to a letter which it evoked in May, 1863, signed by all of the commanders of ironclads in those waters, Captain John Rodgers and Commanders Daniel Ammen, George W. Rodgers, D. M. Fairfax, and John Downes, were the signers, and the letter afterward seen by Captain Drayton and Commander Worden was concurred in by them. and that after the Civil War had ended, it had declined to receive an able and perfectly proper letter concerning operations before Charleston during the period of command of its writer, the Department seems to have wished to spare the reading public the doubts and perplexities which the Dutch judge avoided by not listening to the other side of a case. He had heard the one side and declined hearing the other, as he was then perfectly at re
g them in the attack on Port Royal, November 7, 1861. flag-officer Francis S. Dupont and Captain Charles H. Davis, Chief of staff, with flag on board of the Wabash. Name of vessel.Name of officer commanding.Battery. WabashCommander C. R. P. Rogers.28 IX-in., 14 Viii-in., 2 X-in. pivots. SusquehannaCaptain J. L. Lardner15 Viii-inch guns. MohicanCommander S. W. Godon2 XI-in. pivots, 4 32-pounders. SeminoleCommander John P. Gillis1 XI-in. pivot, 4 32-pounders. PocahontasCommander Percival Drayton1 XI-in. pivot, 4 32-pounders. PawneeLieut.--Com'g R. H. Wyman8 IX.-in. pivot, 2 12-pounder rifles. UnadillaLt.-Com'g Napoleon Collins1 XI in. pivot, 1 20-pdr. rifle, 2 24-pdr. howitzers. OttawaLt-Com'g T. H. Stevens1 XI-in. pivot, 1 20-pounder rifle, 2 24-pounder howitzers. PembinaLt.-Com'g J. P. Bankhead1 XI-in. pivot, 1 20-pounder rifle, 2 24-pounder howitzers. SenecaLt.-Com'g Daniel Ammen1 XI-in. pivot, 1 20-pounder rifle, 2 24-pounder howitzers. Vandalia (sailing s
aware, the, U. S. transport, 46, 177, 179, 183 et seq., 186 et seq., 189 et seq., 192 De Saussure, Colonel, 32 Dismission of Officers, 4 Donavant, Colonel, 27 et seq. Downes, Commander, John, 87, 92, 117, 125, 162(note) Drayton, Commander, Percival, of the Pocahontas, 26; transferred to the Pawnee, 36 et seq., 39; in St. Andrew's Inlet, 50 et seq., 67 et seq.; at Fort McAllister, 87 et seq.; off Charleston, 92, 162 (note) Drayton, General, 16 (note), 19, 21; his description ofDrayton, General, 16 (note), 19, 21; his description of attack on Fort Walker, 24 et seq., 28; report on defence of Forts Walker and Beauregard, 31 et seq.; his coast chart found, 34, 114 Duncan, Commander, Jesse, 142 Dupont, Flag-Officer, Samuel Francis, 13 et seq., 16 et seq., 26, 38; receives a confidential letter from Sherman, 43; reports of, 53 et seq.; report of, 60 et seq., 65, 70; letter to, concerning Beauregard's proclamation, 78 et seq., 83; before Fort McAlister, 85, 87; off Charleston, 91, 100 et seq.; conflicting orders to, 104 e