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William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik. You can also browse the collection for Thomas W. Dresser or search for Thomas W. Dresser in all documents.

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them husband and wife. --Letter, James H. Matheney, Ms., Aug. 21, 1888. That same morning Miss Todd called on her friend Julia M. Jayne, who afterward married Lyman Trumbull, and made a similar request. The Edwardses were notified, and made such meager preparations as were possible on so short notice. License was obtained during the day, the minister, Charles N. Dresser, My father, Rev. Charles Dresser, was a graduate of Brown University, Providence, R. I., of the class of 1822. --Thomas W. Dresser, Ms. letter, Sept. 17, 1888. was sent for, and in the evening of November 4, 1842, as pale and trembling as if being driven to slaughter, Abraham Lincoln was at last married to Mary Todd. While dressing for the wedding in his room at Butler's house, the latter's little boy, Speed, seeing Lincoln so handsomely attired, in boyish innocence asked him where he was going? To hell, I suppose, was Lincoln's reply. One great trial of his life was now over, and another still greater on
nd by the cart-load, which she never used and which accumulated until it was really feared that the floor of the store-room would give way. She was bright and sparkling in conversation, and her memory remained singularly good up to the very close of her life. Her face was animated and pleasing: and to me she was always an interesting woman; and while the whole world was finding fault with her temper and disposition, it was clear to me that the trouble was really a cerebral disease.--Dr. Thomas W. Dresser, letter, January 3, 1889, Ms. By reason of his practical turn of mind Mr. Lincoln never speculated any more in the scientific and philisophical than he did in the financial world. He never undertook to fathom the intricacies of psychology and metaphysics. He was contemplative rather than speculative. He wanted something solid to rest upon, and hence his bias for mathematics and the physical sciences. He bestowed more attention on them than upon metaphysical speculations.