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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 2 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
John G. B. Adams, Reminiscences of the Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment 1 1 Browse Search
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John G. B. Adams, Reminiscences of the Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment, Chapter 5: battles at Peach Orchard, Glendale and Malvern Hill. (search)
months before. We were not disheartened. Many had expected that 1862 would see the end of the war, but it now looked as though those who were spared would see the end of their three years enlistment. The losses in officers had been such that many promotions were made. Four enlisted men were promoted second lieutenants, and I was one of the number. I was assigned to Company I, Capt. J. F. Plympton. By a misunderstanding between Colonel Hincks and Lieutenant-Colonel Devereaux, First Sergeant Driver and myself did not receive our commissions until August, although we continued as acting second lieutenants, the two commissioned by recommendation of Colonel Hincks not being assigned to duty. It was impossible to obtain officers' uniforms, so I bought a pair of brass shoulder-straps, sewed them on my well-worn blouse, borrowed a sword of Lieutenant Mumford and went on duty, as verdant an officer as could be found in the army of the Potomac. About the middle of August I was or
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
ttenberg, Pennsylvania, and later in Union Theological Seminary, New York. It cannot be said that during the period under consideration American scholarship contributed anything of material value to the higher criticism of the Bible. It has to its credit the great New Testament Lexicon (1893) of Professor J. Henry Thayer of Andover Seminary and the equally pre-eminent Hebrew Lexicon (1891) edited by President Francis Brown of Union Seminary, assisted by Professor Briggs of Union and Professor Driver of Oxford. But in the higher discipline its work was of a more mediating and imitative character. Few of our leading scholars took an unyielding attitude to the spirit of the times. Manfully and with unassuming temper, Green of Princeton defended the ancient opinions in a debate with President Harper of the University of Chicago and later in his books, The higher criticism of the Pentateuch (1895), The unity of the Book of Genesis (1895), and General introduction to the Old Testament
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
glas, S. A., 376, 377, 378, 415 Douglass, Wm., 426 Dowd, 352 Down historic Waterways, 165 Down in the West branch, 162 Doyle, Conan, 316 Drannan, W. F., 153 Draper, J. W., 180, 181, 236 Draper, L. C., 173 Dream (Byron), 369 Dream-doomed, 56 Dream life, 110, 111, 112, 113 Dred; a tale of the great dismal Swamp, 71 Dreiser, Theodore, 298 Drescher, Martin, 581, 583 Dresel, J., 581 Dresser, Horatio, 240 n. Drew, Mrs., John, 270 Drisler, Henry, 461 Driver, Professor, 207 Drowsy Sleeper, the, 511 Drummond, Judge, 151 Drum-Taps, 269 Du Barry, 281 Du Bellay, 458 Ducange, 461 Du Chaillu, Paul B., 163 Ducs de Bourgogne, 598 Duden, 578 Dugue, Oscar, 592, 596 Duhring, 436 Dumas, 269 Du Maurier, 379 Dunbar, C. F., 440 Dunciad, 487 Dunlap, 270, 272, 487 Dunne, F. P., 26, 29-30, 289, 290 Dunscombe, 438 DuPonceau, Peter Stephen, 448, 451 Durant, 526 D'Urville, 135 Dutch and Quaker colonies, the,
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
e capture of Col. A. D. Streight by Gen. Nathan B. Forrest. Bragg at this time occupied with the army of Tennessee the Tullahoma line and Rosecrans was at Murfreesboro, both armies being quiet for the time, though their cavalry kept busy. On the night of April 26th, Colonel Streight set out from Tuscumbia, Ala., with 1,500 men, mostly mounted, with orders to cut the railroad in Georgia below Rome. He was promptly followed by a cavalry command under General Forrest. A battle was fought at Driver's gap, Sand mountain, in which Capt. W. H. Forrest, a brother of the general, was severely wounded—it was feared mortally, but he recovered and was in the field again in 1864. Streight, driven from this position, pushed on toward the Georgia line; but on the next day he was overtaken at Black creek, where after heavy skirmishing he crossed and burned the bridge, thus placing a deep and rapid stream between himself and pursuit. It was here that a young Alabama girl, Emma Sanson, mounting be
of this: The Seventh would have stopped a herd of elephants. The Seventh, Taylor reported, lost 156 killed and wounded—about half of its effective force. In the two days of Cross Keys and Port Republic the brigade lost 34 killed and 264 wounded. In the Sixth, Capt. Isaac A. Smith was killed, and Lieutenants Farrar and Martin wounded; in the Seventh, Lieut. J. H. Dedlake was killed, Lieutenant-Colonel De Choiseul mortally wounded, and Col. H. T. Hays, Captain Green and Lieutenants Brooks, Driver and Pendergast wounded; in the Eighth, Lieut. A. G. Moore was killed and Lieutenants Montgomery, Randolph and Wren wounded; in the Ninth Lieutenant Meizell killed; and in Wheat's battalion Lieutenants Cockroft, Coyle, McCarthy, Putnam and Ripley wounded. Captain Surget, adjutant-general, was greatly distinguished, and Lieutenants Hamilton and Kilmartin did valuable service. Taylor's brigade remained with Jackson from the first to the last of the unparalleled series of triumphs of that fa