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Color-Sergeant A. B. Doolittle, severely; Corporals W. M. Campbell, slightly; W. P. Wade, slightly; Privates J. C. Mice, slightly; J. G. Greenwauldt, severely; G. A. Smith, slightly; Ed. Cockran, slightly; F. W. Casper, slightly; W. H. Ralston, severely; W. H. Megill, severely; James Hunter, severely; Charles Flurry, slightly; Wm. McLain, slightly; A. J. Pass, slightly; J. W. Morrison, severely; G. A. Bell, slightly; W. C. Hecker, slightly; A. F. Gore, slightly; Fred. Herbert, slightly; William Drummond, slightly. Company D.--Killed, Sergeant Nathan W. Doty; Private G. Weeks. Wounded, First Lieut. E. F. Ensign, severely; Second Lieut. G. L. Godfrey, slightly; Corporal Wm. Reagan, severely; Privates W. A. Brenton, severely; Casper S. Brady, severely; John W. Coombs, severely; Peter Dresser, slightly; J. H. Hodyn, slightly; Henry Lawrence, slightly; Andrew Slater, leg; Thomas Ward, arm; J. G. Williams, arm; David Yant, arm; William Cady, slightly; P. G. Noel, slightly; J. Cooper, s
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 82.-fight in Hampton roads, Va., March 8th and 9th, 1862. (search)
the contest the mainmast of the Raleigh was carried away. The flagstaffs of the Virginia were also cut down. The report that the Congress was fired by the Federals to prevent her falling into our hands is without a shadow of truth. She was fired by hot shot from the Virginia, for firing into our boats while she had a flag of truce at the time flying after she had struck her colors and surrendered to us. Among the prisoners taken off the Congress was the slave Sam, the property of----Drummond, Esq., of this city, who escaped to the enemy some time in October last. He is now safe, having reached his home sooner and under different circumstances than he anticipated. On the arrival of the Virginia at the yard, her men were mustered and addressed by the commanding officer in terms of praise for their noble bearing during the engagement. They responded with hearty cheers, and expressed a desire to again reenact the scenes through which they had just passed whenever opportunity p
ith a detachment of forty-five men from company E, and Capt. Drummond, with a detail of fifty men from the Fourth Iowa cavalted by a rebel guard of fifty men. Col. McCrellis sent Capt. Drummond, with a detachment of twenty men, to reconnoitre and, ightning. The road led through a very rough country. Capt. Drummond arrived in the vicinity of the cave and soon after dayrty across the river to the cave. The night previous Captain Drummond's men started two of Price's men out of the widow McCy on the march for the protection of the saltpetre. Capt. Drummond and party then returned to the main command at Talbottpport the former if necessary. On the same day that Capt. Drummond returned (nineteenth) Lieut. Wm. M. Heacock, of companer was sent to Col. McCrellis for reinforcements, when Capt. Drummond with sixty men, Capt. McFall and Lieut. Crabtree, with. McFall moved up the river to deceive the enemy, and Captain Drummond's men were concealed behind the boards. The howitzer
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bacon, Nathaniel, 1642- (search)
rnor, alarmed by the proceedings at the Middle Plantation, tied, with his council, to the eastern shore of Chesapeake Bay, where, by promises of booty, he tried to raise an army among the inhabitants and the seamen of English vessels there. William Drummond, who had been the first governor of North Carolina, with his brave and patriotic wife, Sarah, was then with Bacon. Mrs. Drummond did much to incite the Virginians to go on in the path of revolution, and she was denounced as a notorious, wicMrs. Drummond did much to incite the Virginians to go on in the path of revolution, and she was denounced as a notorious, wicked rebel. Her husband proposed to Bacon to proclaim government in the colony abdicated by Berkeley on account of his act. It was suggested that a power would come from England that would ruin the republicans in the colony. Sarah snatched up a small stick from the ground, and exclaimed, I fear the power of England no more than a broken straw. The child that is unborn The old Church Tower at Jamestown, in 1850. shall have cause to rejoice for the good that will come by the rising of the cou
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Berkeley, Sir William, (search)
r bowed head covered with her hands, was done by my means. I am most guilty; let me bear the punishment; let me be hanged; let my husband be pardoned. The governor cried out, angrily, Away with you! The poor young wife swooned, and her husband was led to the gallows. When the brave Drummond was brought before the governor, Berkeley, with wicked satire, made a low bow and said, You are very welcome; I am more glad to see you than any man in Virginia; you shall be hanged in half an hour. Drummond replied, with dignity. I expect no mercy from you. I have followed the lead of my conscience, and done what I might to free my country from oppression. He was condemned at one o'clock and hanged at four; and his brave wife, Sarah, was denounced as a traitor and banished, with her children, to the wilderness, there to subsist on the bounty of friends. When these things were brought to the notice of the profligate monarch, even he was disgusted with Berkeley's cruelties, and said, The old
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Buffalo, (search)
, when his forces had returned from the desolation of the New York frontier. Full license had been given to his Indians, and the desolation was made perfect almost to Black Rock. Riall marched up from Queenston (Dec. 28) to Chippewa, Lieutenant-General Drummond in immediate command. By this time all western New York had been alarmed. McClure had appealed to the people to hasten to the frontier. Gen. Amos Hall called out the militia and invited volunteers. Hall took chief command of troops now gathered at Black Rock and Buffalo, 2,000 strong. From Drummond's camp, opposite Black Rock, Riall crossed the river (Dec. 30) with about 1,000 white men and Indians. The night was dark. They drove the Americans from Black Rock. The militia were alarmed, and at dawn Hall ascertained that 800 of them had deserted. Hall. with the rest of his force, proceeded to attack the invaders. He, too, had a force of Indians: but these, with more of the militia, soon gave way, and, the commander's
ssession of the country. At the opening of the third year of the second war for independence, a favorite project with the United States government was the conquest of Canada. The principal military forces in Upper Canada were under Lieutenant-General Drummond. When the Army of the North, commanded by Major-General Brown, reached the Niagara frontier, Drummond's headquarters were at Burlington Heights, at the western end of Lake Ontario. General Riall was on the Niagara River, at Fort GeorgDrummond's headquarters were at Burlington Heights, at the western end of Lake Ontario. General Riall was on the Niagara River, at Fort George and Queenston; but when lie heard of the arrival of the Americans at Buffalo, under General Scott, he advanced to Chippewa and established a fortified camp. At the close of June, General Brown arrived at Buffalo, and assumed chief command, and, believing his army to be strong enough, he proceeded to invade Canada. His army consisted of two brigades, commanded respectively by Generals Scott and Ripley, to each of which was attached a train of artillery, commanded by Capt. N. Towson and Maj.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Drummond, William, 1677- (search)
Drummond, William, 1677- Colonial governor; born in Scotland; was appointed governor of the Albemarle county colony by Sir William Berkeley, governor of Virginia, and joint proprietary of Carolina. During the Bacon rebellion (see Bacon, Nathaniel), when Berkeley retreated to Accomac, Drummond proposed that Berkeley should beDrummond proposed that Berkeley should be deposed. This proposition met with the favor of the leading planters, who met at Williamsburg and agreed to support Bacon against the government. The death of Bacon left the rebellion without a competent leader. Sir William Berkeley wreaked his vengeance on thirty-three of the principal offenders. When Drummond was brought bement. The death of Bacon left the rebellion without a competent leader. Sir William Berkeley wreaked his vengeance on thirty-three of the principal offenders. When Drummond was brought before him Berkeley exclaimed: I am more glad to see you than any man in Virginia. You shall be hanged in half an hour. He died Jan. 20, 1677.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Erie, Fort, (search)
lued at $200,000. On Aug. 4, 1814, the British, under Lieutenant-Colonel Drummond, began a siege of Fort Erie, with about 5,000 men. DrummDrummond perceived the importance of capturing the American batteries at Black Rock and seizing or destroying the armed schooners in the lake. A f riflemen, militia, and volunteers, under Major Morgan. Meanwhile Drummond had opened fire on Fort Erie with some 24-pounders. From Aug. 7 t heavy cannon. Day by day the siege went steadily on. On the 13th Drummond, having completed the mounting of all his heavy ordnance, began a le impression had been made on the American works. Satisfied that Drummond intended to storm the works, Gaines made disposition accordingly. nd of his army. The fort was closely invested by the British, but Drummond's force, lying upon low ground, was greatly weakened by typhoid fe, by this successful sortie. In the space of an hour the hopes of Drummond were blasted, the fruits of the labor of fifty days were destroyed
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Izard, George 1777-1828 (search)
nking General Brown, he took the chief command of the combined forces, then numbering, with volunteers and militia, about 8,000 men. He prepared to march against Drummond, who, after the sortie at Fort Erie, had moved down to Queenston. Izard moved towards Chippewa, and vainly endeavored to draw Drummond out. He had some skirmiDrummond out. He had some skirmishing in an attempt to destroy a quantity of grain belonging to the British, in which he lost twelve men killed and fifty-four wounded; the British lost many more. Drummond fell hack to Fort George and Burlington Heights. Perceiving further operations in that region to be useless, and perhaps perilous, Izard crossed the river any more. Drummond fell hack to Fort George and Burlington Heights. Perceiving further operations in that region to be useless, and perhaps perilous, Izard crossed the river and abandoned Canada. Knowing Fort Erie to be of little service, he caused it to be mined and blown up, Nov. 5. He died in Little Rock, Ark., Nov. 22, 1828.
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