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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 9 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 6 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 4 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 16, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army .. You can also browse the collection for Dubose or search for Dubose in all documents.

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laconic despatch capturing Lee's supplies delighted Engineers the Confederates' last effort a flag of truce General Geary's last ditch absurdity meeting of Grant and Lee the surrender estimate of General Grant. The first report of the battle of Sailor's Creek that General Grant received was, as already stated, an oral message carried by Colonel Price, of my staff. Near midnight I sent a despatch giving the names of the generals captured. These were Ewell, Kershaw, Barton, Corse, Dubose, and Custis Lee. In the same despatch I wrote: If the thing is pressed, I think that Lee will surrender. When Mr. Lincoln, at City Point, received this word from General Grant, who was transmitting every item of news to the President, he telegraphed Grant the laconic message: Let the thing be pressed. The morning of the 7th we moved out at a very early hour, Crook's division marching toward Farmville in direct pursuit, while Merritt and Mackenzie were ordered to Prince Edward's Court House