hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 29 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 15 11 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 14 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 11 5 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 4 0 Browse Search
L. P. Brockett, The camp, the battlefield, and the hospital: or, lights and shadows of the great rebellion 4 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Duffie or search for Duffie in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

and the militia from part of Pocahontas and Green Brier were present. Rebel killed and wounded three hundred, and over one hundred prisoners, seven hundred stand of small arms, three pieces of artillery, and one stand of colors. Our loss was two officers killed and four wounded, twenty-nine men killed, ninety wounded, and one missing. In this battle, as at Rocky Gap, the rebels overshot us. The battle was fought on Friday, November sixth, and on the seventh we expected to unite with General Duffie, and now that the battle was over, we were in hopes that the Kanawha forces would intercept the fugitives at Lewisburgh. Saturday morning was warm and spring-like, and we took up the line of march for Lewisburgh. After our descent from the mountains, we entered the fertile valley of the Green Brier, which expands to a breadth similar to the Shenandoah, and the same kind of geological formation — Saurian limestone. In coming down the mountain, we came across the brass twelve-pound ho
whacked us at long-range, but hurt none. The rebels, not expecting another raid, had rebuilt their camp and saltpetre works. These we again burnt, together with the potash factory. Started next morning for Callaghan's; during the morning captured one hundred and fifty cattle, that the farmers were driving out of the valley, and a contraband directed us to an extensive saltpetre works, which we destroyed. We arrived at Callaghan's at four o'clock, where we heard of the operations of General Duffie and Colonel Moore, and the retreat of Echols. We marched out on the Sweet Springs road, and encamped for the night on Dunlap's Creek. Hitherto our marches had been by easy stages, twenty miles per day, and had taken special care of our horses; but now we were in the enemy's country and the great object of the expedition before us, and our movements must of necessity be rapid. At two o'clock A. M., started for Sweet Springs, in Monroe, where, we arrived at ten o'clock, and halted fo