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r Givan, Seventh Pennsylvania cavalry, who fell into the hands of the enemy during the street-fight, by mistaking them for our own troops. In this little affair intrepidity and personal daring were conspicuous throughout. Report of General W. W. Duffield. headquarters Twenty-Third brigade, Murfreesboro, Tenn., Tuesday, May 6, 1862. Captain: Agreeably to verbal instructions received from Brig.-Gen. E. Dumont, I started in pursuit of the rebel force commanded by Colonel John H. Morgvates, ten non-commissioned officers, four lieutenants, a captain, and the field-officer in command, Lieut.-Col. Robert E. Wood, Jr., of Adams's cavalry — in all sixty-six--who were turned over to Gen. Dumont, on his return that afternoon. I enclose you herewith the list of prisoners taken, and an inventory of the captured arms. I remain, Captain, your obedient servant, Wm. W. Duffield, Colonel Commanding Twenty-third Brigade. To Capt. T. P. M. Brayton, Assist. Adjt.-General, Nashville.
Doc. 88.-surrender at Murfreesboro, Ky. Colonel Duffield's official report. Murfreesboro, Tenn., July 23, 1862. Colonel: Although I had not yet formally assumed command of the Twenty-thierate States until I am regularly exchanged. I remain, Colonel, your obedient servant, William W. Duffield, Colonel Ninth Michigan Independent Volunteers, Commanding Twenty-third Brigade. Col. Jamppears from the best information that can be obtained that Brigadier-General Crittenden and Colonel Duffield, of the Ninth Michigan, with the six companies of that regiment and all of the cavalry, wertion that these were negro fables entirely unworthy of their attention. Since the departure of Duffield, the brigade has been under the command of Colonel Leicester, who had separated the regiments, irresistible fury, and hurled their death-shots into our slumbering tents. At this moment Colonel Duffield sprang into the centre of the combat, and received two wounds, in a vain endeavor to rally
ennedy, A. A.A. G., and J. Botsford, A. A.D. C., of Col. Scammon's staff, for coolness and efficiency; Colonels George Crook, commanding Second brigade, and Hugh Ewing, commanding First brigade, for energy and skilful bravery; Lieuts. Furbay and Duffield, Thirtieth regiment volunteers, acting as aids to Col. Ewing, and who were both killed; Lieut.-Colonel A. H. Coleman, commanding Eleventh regiment volunteers, killed while gallantly leading his men; Lieut.-Col. J. D. Hines, Twelfth regiment voluected great credit upon themselves and their commands. Capt. Holmes, on account of a wound received in the battle of Fort Donelson, was unable to take command of his company during the engagement. Conspicuous for bravery were Lieuts. Parker, Duffield, Marsh, Wilson, Tisdale, Suiter, Hawill, Hall, Blake, Duckworth, Ballinger, Twombley, and McCord. After Lieuts. Parker and Twombley, of company F, were wounded, Sergt. James Ferry took charge of the company and displayed marked efficiency and c
w-York volunteers, Major Jardine, commanding Eighty-Ninth New-York volunteers, and Major Ringold, commanding One Hundred and Third New-York volunteers, for gallant conduct and able management of their commands. Kanawha division. Lieuts. R. P. Kennedy, A. A.A. G., and J. Botsford, A. A.D. C., of Col. Scammon's staff, for coolness and efficiency; Colonels George Crook, commanding Second brigade, and Hugh Ewing, commanding First brigade, for energy and skilful bravery; Lieuts. Furbay and Duffield, Thirtieth regiment volunteers, acting as aids to Col. Ewing, and who were both killed; Lieut.-Colonel A. H. Coleman, commanding Eleventh regiment volunteers, killed while gallantly leading his men; Lieut.-Col. J. D. Hines, Twelfth regiment volunteers; Color-Sergeants White and Carter, who were both killed, and Corporals Howett, of company D, and Buchanan, of company C, of the same regiments, for rescuing their regimental colors, when the color-sergeants were shot. The General commanding
ting to the men to be cool and steady. He is one of the most valuable young officers with whom I have ever met. Captains Cowles, McCullough, Mastick, Howards, Ensign, and Davis were marked instances of bravery and efficiency upon the field, and reflected great credit upon themselves and their commands. Capt. Holmes, on account of a wound received in the battle of Fort Donelson, was unable to take command of his company during the engagement. Conspicuous for bravery were Lieuts. Parker, Duffield, Marsh, Wilson, Tisdale, Suiter, Hawill, Hall, Blake, Duckworth, Ballinger, Twombley, and McCord. After Lieuts. Parker and Twombley, of company F, were wounded, Sergt. James Ferry took charge of the company and displayed marked efficiency and courage. Likewise after the fall of Lieuts. Huntington and Suiter, of company B, Sergt. Lewis (acting Lieutenant) took charge of the company and rendered most satisfactory service. Too much credit cannot be bestowed upon our excellent First Assistan
ri. Our men all fought like veterans, and compelled the enemy to leave the ground. Our forces would have followed them up but for the sultry hot weather, the men being nearly famished for water. After getting a drink of water and cooling off as well as they could, our men went to scouring the battle-field, and found by the trails of blood that the enemy had been removing their hors du combat men. At six o'clock Monday evening there were nine of our men dead and forty wounded. From the best information we could get from the yeomanry of the neighborhood, who came into our lines in the evening after the battle, to get permission to scour the battle-ground and vicinity for dead and wounded rebels, there was from seventy-five to one hundred of them killed and wounded. Company E, of the Third Iowa cavalry, commanded by Captain Duffield, suffered more than any other company in the column. One of the company was killed dead on the ground, three mortally wounded, and eight severely.