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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 5 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 24. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 1 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for R. T. W. Duke or search for R. T. W. Duke in all documents.

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nt and Harman to call out the armed companies of his brigade. At 5 p. m. Harper left for Winchester by rapid conveyance, after ordering Harman to take command of the trains and troops that might report en route. Reaching Winchester at noon of the 18th, Harper received orders from Letcher to go on to Harper's Ferry. The two companies from Staunton left by the Virginia Central railroad about sunset; at Charlottesville they were joined by Capt. W. B. Mallory's Monticello guards and Capt. R. T. W. Duke's Albemarle rifles, and at Culpeper by a rifle company. Manassas Junction was reached at about sunrise of the 18th, when Harman impressed a Manassas Gap railroad train to take the lead toward Strasburg, followed by the other trains that had brought troops to the junction. The Ashbys and Funsten left Richmond on the 16th to collect their cavalry companies, and those of the Black Horse cavalry under Capts. John Scott and R. Welby Carter of Fauquier; these to march across the Blue ridge
lion): Bridgford, D. B., major; Munford, John D., major; Seddon, John, major. First Infantry battalion Local Defense Troops (Armory battalion): Ayres, Thomas H., major; Downer, William S., major; Ford, C. H., major. First battalion Reserves: Duke, Richard Thomas Walker, lieutenant-colonel; Strange, James M., major. First battalion Valley Reserves: Miller, W. A. J., major. First Infantry Local Defense Troops: James, James F., colonel. First Infantry regiment (Williams' Rifles): Dooleiel C., major. Forty-sixth Cavalry battalion (consolidated with Forty-seventh battalion to form Twenty-sixth Cavalry): Kesler, Joseph K., lieutenant-colonel; Ruffner, Henry D., major. Forty-sixth Infantry regiment: Davis, J. Lucius, colonel; Duke, Richard Thomas Walker, colonel; Fry, Hugh Walker, Jr., major; Harrison, Randolph, lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Hill, James C., major; Richardson, John H., lieutenant-colonel, colonel; Wise, Peyton, major, lieutenant-colonel. Forty-sixth Militi
29, 1865, was ordered to the command of the western department of Virginia, relieving General Breckinridge. On April 2d he began a march to unite with Lee, and reached Christiansburg on the 10th, where he received a telegram announcing the surrender at Appomattox. It was a terrible blow to his little army of 6,000 or 7,000 men, and caused indescribable consternation. At a council of war it was determined to march to unite with Johnston's army, and Echols set out at the head of Vaughn's and Duke's brigades on the 11th. Subsequently he accompanied President Davis to Augusta, Ga., and was for a short time in command at that place. After the close of hostilities he re-entered the law practice at Staunton, also exerted a beneficent influence in public affairs as a member of the committee of nine, in restoring Virginia to its proper relations with the general government, and as a member of the Virginia legislature. He was one of the early members of Stonewall Jackson camp, Confederate