Your search returned 17 results in 6 document sections:

as nearly fifteen years of age his father yielded to his wishes, and sent him to a school in Western Virginia; but he was disappointed in its character, and remained only one session. He was afterward, for a short time, in the drug-store of Mr. Thomas Duke; but, whether with the intention of adopting trade or medicine as a line of life, we are not informed. Throughout life he showed an uncommon knowledge of physiology, and acquaintance with medical practice; due in part, perhaps, to this appe to enter the navy. The gallant achievements of the American Navy in the war against Great Britain, and the subsequent daring exploits of Decatur at Algiers, had doubtless inspired him with the desire to emulate these high examples. His friends Duke and Smith, under the same impulse, sought and obtained warrants as midshipmen. But this project received no favor at home. His father and family opposed it; and, in order to divert his mind from brooding over a plan on which he had set his heart
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Company a, Fifteenth Virginia Infantry, Confederate States Army. (search)
lk; 17. Detached on signal corps. Christopher C. Cherry; 22. Wounded at Sharpsburg, and died of wounds in Maryland; first sergeant. Stephen J. Childrey; 21. George T. Catlett; 23. Robert H. Clayton; 21. Transferred to navy. Thomas J. Crabbin; 31. Supposed to have died in hospital near Winchester, in 1862. Thomas B. Chamberlayne; 18. Detached as teamster. Not accounted for. Richard S. Denny; 17. Did not serve. John B. Dodd; 19. Sergeant; killed at Drewry's Bluff. Thomas Duke; 19. Discharged. Alonzo M. Duke; 22. Led charge on Howlett line, June 16, 1864; made corporal July 1, 1864. Robert A. Day; 17. Wounded at Sharpsburg. Foster P. Galley; 33. First sergeant; wounded at Dinwiddie Court House, March 31, 1865. Theophilus P. Gill; 21. Not accounted for. Joseph B. Garthright; 19. Wounded at Sharpsburg. Joseph A. Gill; 18. Died in 1861. John Henry Gill; 31. Wounded at Dinwiddie Court House, March 31, 1865. John T. Grubbs; 22. Died at Chim
Turbulent behavior. --A difficulty occurred on Tuesday evening at Thomas Duke's stable, on 18th street, originating in some misunderstanding about settling for the hire of a horse and vehicle, the principal actors in which were Thomas Burnes and Michael McCarthy. The former, it is alleged, drew a knife upon Mr. Duke, when watchman Wickes came up for the purpose of arresting the offender, and McCarthy attacked the officer, tearing his coat, but causing no personal injury. The result was ctors in which were Thomas Burnes and Michael McCarthy. The former, it is alleged, drew a knife upon Mr. Duke, when watchman Wickes came up for the purpose of arresting the offender, and McCarthy attacked the officer, tearing his coat, but causing no personal injury. The result was that Burnes and McCarthy were arraigned before the Mayor yesterday, and not only required to give security to keep the peace, but for their appearance at the Hustings Court to answer an indictment for misdemeanor.
nport for stealing a horse valued at $400 from Lieut, J. S. Dorsett and another from Capt. Lewis J. Hawley, valued at $250 It appears that McGinness came in the city at an early hour yesterday, with Dorsett's horse, which he sold for $165 to Mr. Thomas Duke, at which time he promised to bring another one in the evening. In the meantime Dorsett appeared, identified claimed, and received his horse. When the thief came sack he brought Capt. Hawley's horse, which he also offered for sale, when he me he promised to bring another one in the evening. In the meantime Dorsett appeared, identified claimed, and received his horse. When the thief came sack he brought Capt. Hawley's horse, which he also offered for sale, when he was seized by Mr. Duke and held till officer Seal arrived. McGinness disclaimed having ever belonged to the Wise Mounted Guard, commanded by Capt Hawley.--The officers are of opinion that he has been engaged in the business so opportunely broken up for some time past.
induce her to trespass on C. C. Timsley. She was sent to jail for want of a register.--Richard Kelley was arraigned for allowing himself to get in a passion, in the house of Cornelius Lannigan, and attack the proprietor. The latter accompanied him because he had seen fit to use an axe on Kelley, in the way of adjustment, to convince him of the impropriety of his conduct. Both parties were required to give $150 security for their good behavior.--A muss having occurred in the stable of Mr. Thomas Duke, on 17th street, between Curtis, one of Mr. D.'s hands, and a stray darkey, named Dabney, both were caged for breaking the peace. It appeared that Curtis had been too much for Dabney, the latter receiving considerable punishment, owing to the superior science of his antagonist. The Head of Police, deeming that superior intelligence should be rewarded, bestowed on Curtis a token in the shape of twenty-five lashes.--Two cases of alleged assault and battery were heard and dismissed. In
did not open the bag, though they were given to him to keep at night. The bags were about the size of an ordinary apple. Took the money from him, cause he was drunk. His mother money, but witness refused to give Gave it to John Duke. Thomas Duke, being recalled he knew of the money in possess Duke alluded to by Devines. Witness gave him about thirty dollars in gold some two months before the evacuation. S. S. Clarke testified to the good character of the accused. He had knoDuke alluded to by Devines. Witness gave him about thirty dollars in gold some two months before the evacuation. S. S. Clarke testified to the good character of the accused. He had known them since they were boys. Charles Fletcher testified that he saw John Duke in Philadelphia frequently, and that he was attentive to business. Alexander Myers also testified to the good character of the Dukes. Had seen Lizzie Seals and Mary Nixon about Mr. Batkins's quite frequently, and had driven them away. Sometimes men were with them. Went with Mr. Batkins the night he lost his money to look for it, but did not find it. George F. Bence, of the Twenty-fourth Massachusetts