hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
The Daily Dispatch: May 11, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 12, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

The Daily Dispatch: May 11, 1864., [Electronic resource], A Yankee description of Garibaldi in London. (search)
you all my gratitude" In reply to the working men, he said; "I like to see workingmen particularly. I am very grateful, and will forget not in all my life this welcome of the class I have the honor to belong to. I like them to call me the brother of the working man of every part of the world. " There was something curious at once and subline in seeing this brother of the workingmen, who had labored in England and in New York, enter into the magnificent coach of one of the wealthiest of English Dukes a few moments after avowing his relation to nearly the lowliest class of English society. When I left with the crowd I got away by a blind passage to the river, and went back to Westminster. It was a glorious day and a glorious sight that how greet, my eyes. The magnificent Westminster Hall, which borders on the river, lined up its superb towers; but now every lower and turret was alive with human beings. The bridge itself, the finest, doubtless in the world, was lined with human
you all my gratitude" In reply to the working men, he said: "I like to see workingmen particularly. I am very grateful, and will forget not in all my life this, welcome of the class I have the honor to belong to I like them to call me the brother of the working man of every part of the world. " There was something curious at once and sublime in seeing this brother of the workingmen, who had labored in England and in New York, enter into the magnificent coach of one of the wealthiest of English Dukes a few moments after avowing his relation to nearly the lowliest class of English society. When I left with the crowd I got away by a blind passage to the river, and went back to Westminster. It was a glorious day and a glorious sight that now greeted my eyes. The magnificent Westminster Hall, which borders on the river, lifted up its superb towers; but now every tower and turret was alive with human beings. The bridge itself, the finest, doubtless, in the world, was lined with hu