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Fifth Kansas cavalry; Abraham Manon, company A, Fifth Kansas cavalry; D. W. Boutwell, company A, Fifth Kansas cavalry; Corporal William Steele, company A, Fifth Kansas cavalry; George Cox, company B, Fifth Kansas cavalry; Sergeant James Clarke, company C, Fifth Kansas cavalry; Sergeant Arthur T. Perry, company C, Fifth Kansas cavalry; George W. Smith, company C, fifth Kansas cavalry; Lewis N. Gibson, company C, Fifth Kansas cavalry; Thomas S. Fuller, company C, Fifth Kansas cavalry; Sergeant William Duncan, company D, Fifth Kansas cavalry; F. M. White, company D, Fifth Kansas cavalry; Andrew Rogers, company E, Fifth Kansas cavalry; Matthew Schaus, company F, Fifth Kansas cavalry; James Grooms, company F, Fifth Kansas cavalry; David N. Snook, company H, Fifth Kansas cavalry; Dennis Forrester, company K, Fifth Kansas cavalry; Corporal Wm. Bilderback, company A, First Indiana cavalry; Wm. Dean, company E, First Indiana cavalry; James L. Crawford, company F, First Indiana cavalry; George
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the Atlanta campaign. May 3d-September 8th, 1864. (search)
ns. Maj. Charles Houghtaling: C, 1st Ill., Capt. Mark H. Prescott; I, 2d Ill., Capt. Charles M. Barrett; 7th Ind., Capt. Otho H. Morgan; 19th Ind., Lieut. W. P. Stackhouse; 20th Ind., Assigned August 14th. Capt. Milton A. Osborne; I, 1st Ohio, Relieved August 14th. Capt. Hubert Dilger; 15th Wis., Capt. George Q. Gardner, Lieut. Joseph McKnight. Twentieth Army Corps, Maj.-Gen. Joseph Hooker, Brig.-Gen. Alpheus S. Williams, Maj.-Gen. Henry W. Slocum. Escort: K, 15th Ill. Cav., Capt. William Duncan. First division, Brig.-Gen. Alpheus S. Williams, Brig.-Gen. Joseph F. Knipe, Brig.-Gen. A. S. Williams. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. J. F. Knipe, Col. Warren W. Packer, Brig.-Gen. J. F. Knipe: 5th Conn., Col. W. W. Packer, Lieut.-Col. Henry W. Daboll, Maj. William S. Cogswell, Col. W. W. Packer; 3d Md. (detachment), Lieut. David Gove, Lieut. Donald Reid, Lieut. David Gove; 123d N. Y., Col. Archibald L. McDougall, Lieut.-Col. James C. Rogers; 141st N. Y., Col. William K. Logie, Lieut.-
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces in the campaign of the Carolinas. (search)
rces in the campaign of the Carolinas. The Union Army. Major-General William T. Sherman. Headquarters' Guard: 7th Co. Ohio Sharp-shooters, Lieut. James Cox. Engineers and Mechanics: 1st Mich., Maj. John B. Yates; 1st Mo. (5 co's), Lieut.-Col. William Tweeddale. Artillery, See divisions and corps with which the batteries served. Brig.-Gen. William F. Barry (chief-of-artillery). right wing (Army of the Tennessee), Maj.-Gen. Oliver O. Howard. Escort: K, 15th Ill. Cav., Capt. William Duncan; 4th Co. Ohio Cav., Capt. John L. King. Pontoon Train Guard: E, 14th Wis., Capt. William I. Henry. Fifteenth Army Corps, Maj.-Gen. John A. Logan. first division, Brig.-Gen. Charles R. Woods. First Brigade, Col. William B. Woods: 12th Ind., Col. Reuben Williams; 26th Iowa, Maj. John Lubbers; 27th Mo., Col. Thomas Curly; 31st and 32d Mo. (6 co's), Lieut.-Col. Abraham J. Seay; 76th Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Edward Briggs. Second Brigade, Col. Robert F. Catterson, Brig.-Gen. Charles C. Wa
f the wines of Andalusia, they consume almost unheard — of quantities of Bourbon and rifle-whisky. The yards of the rich are decorated with shrubbery, and what is far more in accordance with good taste, forest-trees are left standing and neatly trimmed — a custom which has been too sadly neglected in the North. There are several substantial brick and frame business-houses, all of which have been stripped and deserted. The names of firms were painted above the doors; they were, Terry & Duncan, Campbell & Dodds, J. T. Kemper, , and numerous others which it is unnecessary to designate. Mr. Kemper kept the Baltimore clothing Store, but neither he nor his clothing could be found. A druggist, whose name I have forgotten, determined to remain. Not enough of the Corinthians remained to welcome us, to give me any idea of what the mass of the citizens are like. A few poor persons, the druggist referred to, and the Mayor's clerk, and two or three wealthy females, were all that were t
, except the firing of the few shells on twentieth. Grand salute to-day, at sunrise, along our entire line, and at Forts Johnson, Sumter and Moultrie, in honor of our successes before Richmond. Enemy reported to be advancing. Troops under arms and to the front. False alarm. Enemy suspected to be about to retire from the Island. July 5.--Enemy's land-force, known to have been retiring for several days from Grimball's, now ascertained to be all withdrawn from that place. Transports, for several days past, seen going out of Stono. Gunboats in the river off Grimball's. July 7.--Major William Duncan, First regiment South--Carolina volunteers, narrowly escaped being made prisoner by a party of the enemy, at the large work thrown up between Rivers's burnt house and the Stono. Party probably from gunboats. Enemy withdrawn from Legare's. July 8.--Enemy known to have altogether abandoned James Island, and our city to be safe for the present.--Charleston Mercury, September 22.
of his regiment and handled them well, but was taken prisoner early in the action. Capt. Starr, with his company, (C,) did good execution. Major Winfrey, Captain Duncan and his company, Lieuts. Campbell and Cheeck, Capt. Carter and his company, all of the Fifth Kentucky, behaved well and managed their troops with skill, and pand informed him of the fact. He ordered me to place a good officer in the rear of my regiment, and fight as they approached. This order I obeyed by placing Captain Duncan in the rear, instructing him as directed by the General. But a few minutes elapsed until they commenced firing upon my rear and right flank at the same time. At this juncture, no one could describe my feelings, believing, as I did, that my regiment, and particularly Capt. Duncan and his company, would be cut to pieces without any probable means of escape. I again sent a courier to the General, informing him of my condition, and telling him to immediately halt the column and fight th
s made. The garrison of the intrenchments on the morning of the attack consisted of the brigade of Col. Wilder, of the Seventeenth Indiana infantry, which was composed of the Seventeenth, Sixty-seventh, and Eighty-third regiments of Indiana troops, and company G of the Louisville Provost Guards, under command of Lieut. H. Watson. The rebel force attacking consisted of two brigades of the First division of Gen. Bragg's army, under Simon II. Buckner, but commanded in this attack by Brig.-General Duncan, of Mississippi. The brigades were composed of Mississippi, Georgia, and Alabama troops. Our pickets were first fired on about three o'clock on Sunday morning, but the engagement did not become general until about five. The pickets at the house of Mr. Lewis, on the right of the railroad and beyond the woods, were first attacked, but they did not fall back until five o'clock. It is noteworthy that the rebels made their first attack at the same point at which they attacked Col. Wil
night I accompanied General Sherman in a small boat on a visit to General Hazen, to the Fort, and thence down the river to the steamer. Here we learned that Captain Duncan and the two scouts that I had sent down the Ogeechee, on arriving at the Savannah Canal, had succeeded in passing all obstructions, and reached the fleet, andign than the Medical. To Assistant-Surgeon D. L. Huntington, Acting Medical Director, is due great praise for his diligence and eminent success. To him and to Dr. Duncan, the staff surgeons, the officers and soldiers at headquarters of the army are indebted for all the medical aid they require. Major C. H. Howard, Senior Aid- remarkably efficient, and has often received my special thanks. Captain E. H. Kirlin, Chief of Scouts, has carefully reconnoitred the country, through Captain William Duncan and the other scouts, and kept me well advised of the movements of the enemy. Lieutenant J. A. Gladen has cherfully aided me, writing at my dictation,
night I accompanied General Sherman in a small boat on a visit to General Hazen, to the Fort, and thence down the river to the steamer. Here we learned that Captain Duncan and the two scouts that I had sent down the Ogeechee, on arriving at the Savannah Canal, had succeeded in passing all obstructions, and reached the fleet, andign than the Medical. To Assistant-Surgeon D. L. Huntington, Acting Medical Director, is due great praise for his diligence and eminent success. To him and to Dr. Duncan, the staff surgeons, the officers and soldiers at headquarters of the army are indebted for all the medical aid they require. Major C. H. Howard, Senior Aid- remarkably efficient, and has often received my special thanks. Captain E. H. Kirlin, Chief of Scouts, has carefully reconnoitred the country, through Captain William Duncan and the other scouts, and kept me well advised of the movements of the enemy. Lieutenant J. A. Gladen has cherfully aided me, writing at my dictation,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations before Charleston in May and July, 1862. (search)
, offensively, since repulse of 16th ult., except the firing of the few shell on 20th. Grand salute today at sunrise along our entire line, and at Forts Johnson, Sumter, and Moultrie, in honor of our successes before Richmond. Enemy reported to be advancing. Troops under arms and to the front. False alarm. Enemy suspected to be about to retire from the island. July 5. Enemy's land force, known to have been retiring for several days from Grimball's, now ascertained to be all withdrawn from that place. Transports for several days past seen going out of Stono. Gunboats in the river off Grimball's. July 7. Major William Duncan, First regiment South Carolina Volunteers, narrowly escaped being made prisoner by a party of the enemy at the large work thrown up between Rivers's burnt house and the Stono; party probably from gunboats. Enemy withdrawn from Legare's. July 8. Enemy known to have altogether abandoned James Island, and our city to be safe for the present.
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