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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 2 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 2 2 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 2 0 Browse Search
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 9, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 12, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 2 0 Browse Search
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eantime been promoted to brigadier-general. The regiments of the First and Second brigades were consolidated into one brigade, which was afterward known as the Missouri brigade, and was put under his command. The First and Third cavalry made a regiment, with Gates, colonel; Samuels, lieutenant-colonel; Parker, major. The First and Fourth infantry had, before that time, been consolidated. The Second and Sixth infantry were consolidated, with Flournoy, colonel; Carter, lieutenant-colonel; Duncan, major. Colonel Hudspeth of the Sixth was retired because of wounds. Maj. T. M. Carter, by right of seniority, was entitled to the command, but waived his claim, as did other officers, in favor of Captain Flournoy. The First and Third infantry were consolidated, with Mc-Cown, colonel; McDowell, lieutenant-colonel; Williams, major. Colonel Gause was sent west of the Mississippi on recruiting service, and Lieutenant-Colonels Bevier and Garland were ordered to Richmond to take charge of exc
and and State. His talents were of the first order. Though scarcely reaching middle age, he was for some years before the war acknowledged to be at the head of the Florida bar with such contemporaries as Sanderson, Archer, Yonge, Forward, Burrit and others, who shed luster upon the forum of our State. Of eleven captains of the Second Florida who went into this battle, four, Captains C. S. Flagg, I. H. Pooser, C. A. Butler and T. A. Perry, were killed; and six, Captains McCaslan, Musgrove, Duncan, Williams, Moore and Ballantine, were wounded. Lieutenant-Colonel Pyles was also severely wounded, from which he never recovered, and died soon after the termination of the war. Our limits will not permit the special mention of each noble son of Florida who fell upon this bloody field. Their names are recorded in a sketch of Florida Troops in Virginia, in a memoir of Charles Seton Fleming, written by his brother, Ex-Governor Frank P. Fleming, from which liberal quotations are made in th
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Authorities. (search)
s, A. W.G.: Gauley Bridge and Camp Dickerson, W. Va. 5, 948 Davis, Jefferson C.: Marietta, Ga. 38 i, 638, 639 Davis, Nelson H.: Gettysburg, Pa. 27 III, 1087 Delafield, Richard: Embrasure blinds 51 i, 580 De Lisle, Charles G.: Torpedoes, Charleston Harbor 14, 950,951 De Russy, R. E.: San Francisco Harbor, Cal. 50 II, 533 Doolittle, Edwin D.: Morris Island, S. C. 28 i, 241-255 Doull, Alexander: Fredericksburg, Va. 21, 1127 Duncan, Johnson K.: Forts Jackson and Saint Philip, La. 6, 546 Echols, William H.: Devil or Torpedo Searcher 14, 254 Charleston Harbor, S. C. 14, 251-253 Elliot, G. D.: Sabine Pass, Tex. 26 i, 296 Emory, William. H.: Pleasant Hill, La. 34 i, 391 Monett's Ferry, La. 34 i, 395 Sabine Cross-Roads, La. 34 i, 390 Engineer bureau, C. S. Army: Alabama River obstructions 15, 1020 Engelmann, Adolph: Fourche Bayou, Ark. 22 i, 515 Foster,
. Fowler, F; John B. Hazard, I; W. J. O'Brien, B. Lieuts. J. A. Hall, Company K; A. B. Nelson, D; R. T. B. Parham, H; A. Young, A. Sergt. Maj. William Mink. Sergt. J. M. J. Tally, Company K; John Ives, A; Samuel S. Wiley, D. Privates Martin Duggan, Company B; Melbourn Deloach, C; Joseph Hall, E; Samuel M. Roberts (killed), F; A. W. Scott, G; James R. Green, H; N. Lankford (killed), I; A. Posey, K. Vol. XX, Part 2—(403) November 14, 1862, regiment transferred from General Jackson's to General Duncan's brigade, Withers' division. (432) Fourth brigade, Colonel Manigault, army of Tennessee, November, 1862. Lieut.-Col. W. B. Dennett commanding regiment. Vol. XXIII, Part 2—(735) Assignment as above, April 1, 1863. (942, 959) Manigault's brigade, Withers' division, Polk's army corps, Col. N. N. Davis commanding regiment, August, 1863. No. 51—(15) Manigault's brigade, Bragg's army, battle of Chickamauga, September, 1863. (342-344) Mentioned in General Manigault's report: T
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The opening of the lower Mississippi in April, 1862-a reply to Admiral Porter. (search)
ide. The former were under the command of General Duncan, and the latter under the command of Commoiral Porter's article, who says, page 950, General Duncan told me that he had no authority whatever Fort Jackson and near the obstructions, as General Duncan wished and urged, Admiral Porter, in his a below Forts Jackson and St. Philip, under General Duncan, and the still helpless Louisiana, under Cth that Commodore Mitchell was informed by General Duncan that he had received a demand from Admiralrs, &c., &c., &c. Then I handed the pen to General Duncan and Colonel Higgins, who coolly signed theears that a request, or order, was sent by General Duncan, commanding Fort Jackson, to Commander Mitty of the Louisiana. That in the position General Duncan desired the Louisiana to assume, she wouldter, United States Navy, remonstrated with General Duncan against such a course, but was told it wasthe Navy. Before this court convened, General Duncan died. It is worthy of note that neither[4 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
nder Captain E. G. Benson. The Lynchburg Zouaves came in with the Washington boys and also claimed very general notice. The Zouaves are a well-drilled lot. Virginia military Institute Cadets. The cadets from the Virginia Military Institute, a magnificent-looking lot of young fellows, assembled on Broad street—right resting on the east side of Seventh. There were 190 cadets in line. This section of the column was headed by the Institute band of eight pieces—H. Krause leader. Major Duncan, commandant of cadets, was in command, and the other Institute officers were Captains Ford and Mason and Adjutant Lewis. The four companies were immediately in charge of Cadet-Captains Angel, McCormick, Harden, and Taliaferro. The cadets attracted attention all along the line of march, and were heartily applauded for their beautiful marching and drilling. Virginia Infantry. Virginia brought up the rear in the line of infantry, and her four regiments made a strong background for
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 2 (search)
gade and a few pieces of artillery occupied Fort Alexander, which was to the rear of Fort Gregg and higher up the Appomattox; and that fort was evacuated, the infantry and artillery retiring to the inner line of works, before Fort Gregg was attacked in force. I have letters from Lieutenants Snow, Craige, Howard, and Rigler, of my brigade, who were in Fort Gregg when it fell; and these officers estimate the number of Harris's brigade in that fort at not more than twenty, including a Lieutenant-Colonel Duncan and his adjutant, while they estimate the number from my brigade to have been at least three-fourths of the entire force. I commanded a North Carolina brigade from the battle of Sharpsburg to the surrender at Appomattox Courthouse, and during that time, with the single exception of the Thirty-seventh regiment at Jericho Ford, my entire command always behaved most gallantly, and won for themselves an enviable army reputation. James H. Lane, Late Brigadier-General, C. S. A.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
came up about 10 o'clock A. M., and ordered me with my battery and Williams' section of artillery across the river again. Upon getting my battery over the river, I put my guns in position along the old line as I thought best, and awaited ulterior orders from headquarters. My only support were the feeble remains of a company of so-called cavalry under Captain Strange. In all the twenty men of his command there was not a single man or officer decently mounted. With my old fiery Bucephalus, Duncan, I could have charged and overturned every skeleton of a horse in his company. But the men were all true tar-heels, and there was no braver man than Captain Strange. On the afternoon of the 10th the artillery was ordered back on the south side, and preparations made to leave Weldon. According to Captain Webb, there were then at that point about five hundred men, including at least seventy-five stragglers, furloughed men, convalescents from the hospitals, and detailed men. On the 12th t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The artillery defenders of Fort Gregg. (search)
rt Gregg was attacked in force. I have letters from Lieutenants Snow, Craige, Howard and Rigler, who were in Gregg when it fell, and these officers estimate the number of Harris' brigade in that fort at not more than twenty, including a Lieutenant-Colonel Duncan and his adjutant, while they estimate the numbers from my brigade to have been at least three-fourths the entire force. It is not my desire to enter into any lengthy discussion regarding the gallant infantry defenders of Fort Greggity. Even if we wished to withdraw the guns, the enemy has a battery exploding shells at the entrance to the fort, and it is impossible to get in or out. Meanwhile, Harris had placed his men in the forts, himself going into Whitworth, and Colonel Duncan with the Twelfth and Sixteenth Mississippi regiments entering Gregg. Lieutenant Walke was more fortunate (or unfortunate) at Whitworth than I was at Gregg, and withdrew the guns, as ordered by General Walker. The enemy were now advancin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Confederate treaty. (search)
rom President Juarez authorizing him to make a treaty with me on the basis I had suggested, and asking for a conference at his headquarters as soon as convenient. In order to conclude the matter I called on him at once, with the result that we made a treaty providing for the rendition of criminals and delivery of stolen property. The treaty was both fair and just to the Mexican and Confederate governments alike. Colonel Garza signed for Mexico, and I signed as lieutenant-colonel, commanding Fort Duncan, for the Confederate Government. The treaty was forwarded to President Juarez, who approved it. I also sent it to President Davis, with copies of all correspondence on the subject, a statement of the situation on the Rio Grande that caused me to take the responsibility I had, expressing the hope that my action in the matter would meet with his approval. President Davis acknowledged the receipt of the treaty, announced his approval, and paid me a high compliment for my efforts in
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