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Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 22, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 20, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 2 0 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.31 (search)
ere getting very thick and the situation hot, to say the least. On our return to the fort we found two guns of the Third Company of Washington Artillery, two three-inch Parrot guns, which had been stationed in our front, but not having the horses, they were rolled by hand into the fort. They occupied the position looking towards Hatcher's Run. We were also re-enforced by a portion of General Harris' gallant Mississippians, the 12th and 16th Regiments, about 150 men, under command of Colonel Duncan. The writer happened to be at what was considered the weakest part of the fort, in the angle where the stockade and earthworks met. He being a small man, was ordered to go elsewhere, so he took his position between the two guns. The assault began on our right flank. They came in three lines of battle, one behind the other, with their flags floating in the center, but it was only after the fourth charge that they succeeded in entering the ditch in front of the fort. For some time we c
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Roster of Company E, Nineteenth Virginia Infantry. (search)
, 1861, at Manassas, of typhoid fever. Dowell, Major M., wounded August 30, 1862, in Second Mannassas battle; killed July 3, 1863, at Gettysburg. Dunett, Thomas D., captured April 26, 1862, at Yorktown; exchanged August 5, 1862; wounded in hip July 3, 1863, in battle of Gettysburg, and captured; exchanged August 28, 1863. Dowell, R. E., wounded in hip in battle at Brook Church, May 12, 1864; little finger shot off in battle at Cold Harbor. Dowell, Ezekiel, enlisted August, 1863. Duncan, J. B. Draper, John, discharged on regular detail. Edwards, Tazewell S., discharged by conscript act, over thirty-five years of age; re-enlisted and promoted fourth sergeant. Edwards, Brice J., wounded in head in battle of Gaines' Mill, June 27, 1862; discharged by conscript act, over thirty-five years of age. Eastin, Granville, wounded in battle of Seven Pines, June I, 1862; killed in battle at Boonsboro, Md., September 14, 1862. Eastin, Henry, killed at Yorktown April 26, 1862.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Black Eagle Company. (search)
Clopton, Walter, wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., 1863. Cosby, Charles, exempted from service, 1861. Cosby, George, corporal; wounded at Gaines' Mill, Va., 1862; dead. Cosby, Richard, killed at Gaines' Mill, Va., 1862. Daingerfield, John, exempted from service, 1861; dead. Daniel, John C., transferred to cavalry 1862; dead. Dawson, Judson, wounded at Gaines' Mill, Va., 1862. Dawson, William, exempted from service, 1861. Dowdy, James, killed at Gettysburg, Pa., 1863. Duncan, Joseph, on detail service during the war. Fleming, A. J., orderly sergeant; exempted from service, 1862. Flippen, E. A., wounded at Gaines' Mill, Va., 1862. Frayser, James, exempted from service, 1862. Frayser, Robert, color sergeant; wounded near Richmond, Va., 1862. Frayser, William, wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., 1863. French, Hugh H.; wounded at Gettysburg, Pa., 1863; dead. Gilliam, Carter, orderly sergeant; killed at Gettysburg, Pa., 1863. Goodman, E. M., exempted
the Rev. W. Turner , Jun. , MA., Lives of the eminent Unitarians, Caleb Rotheram, D. D. (search)
of Aberdeen. How long he remained here we are not enabled to ascertain, as he does not appear to have become a regular member of the university, but merely to have taken up his residence in its vicinity as a private student, attending such lectures as he thought proper. He had here also the advantage of cultivating the society of many eminent persons who at that time gave a more than ordinary lustre to this seat of learning: among the rest, Dr. T. Blackwell, Dr. G. Turnbull, Dr. Reid, Messrs. Duncan and David Fordyce, and Mrs. Cockburne, well known as an able defender of the metaphysical principles of Locke and Clarke. On his return from Aberdeen, Mr. Aikin became for a short time an assistant to his former friend and tutor, Dr. Doddridge; agreeably to the practice which that eminent man was accustomed to pursue in the conduct of his academy, by engaging in succession for several years such students as had particularly distinguished themselves by diligence, proficiency, and prop
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—the naval war. (search)
the forts, refused to listen to Lovell's advice or the requests of Duncan, and by his inaction during the bombardment exposed himself to sevearth, the fort would have been destroyed in two or three days. General Duncan and his two lieutenants, Colonels Higgins and McIntosh, encourawas a dark night; the Confederate ships, still careless in spite of Duncan's warnings, had neither boats posted to watch the river, nor fires ding his troops near the quarantine, invested them completely. General Duncan was, nevertheless, in hopes of being able to resist a little whlip. The soldiers were already exchanging signals; and in spite of Duncan's efforts, the garrison of the first fort prepared to abandon it. All resistance had become impossible. The day following, the 28th, Duncan and Porter signed a capitulation, in which the latter was pleased toainly have destroyed the Harriet Lane, on board of which Porter and Duncan had met to arrange the details of the convention. While General
y of David Howard.   Mary (daughter) Howard, SarahWoburn, Apr. 10, 1765In family of Simon Tufts. Hunt, JeremiahJuly 10, 1751Tenant of John Willis.   (wife and family) Huss, MaryJan. 30, 1791 Hutchins, SusannaMaiden, Mar. 15, 1763Nov. 30, 1763In family of Jonathan Sprague (about loyrs.old). Inglesbe, BethiahChelsea, May 3, 1754In family of Timothy Hall. Single woman. Ingols, EuniceNewbury, July i, 1771Daughter of James and Bathshua Peirson. Ingolls, LucyJan. 30, 1791 Ingraham, Duncan, Esq.Aug. 31, 1797(Signed) Richard Hall. Isebester, ChristianWatertown, Sept., 1768In family of Ebenezer Hall, Jr. Charlestown, abt. Oct. 15, 1770 Jackson, CharlesStoneham, Apr. 8, 1763Tenant of John Bishop.   Elizabeth (wife)   Anna (child) Jackson, CharlesChildren of Mrs. Jos. Stan-   Hannahyan. See Joseph Stanyan.   HannahStoneham, May, 1764Mar. 1, 1765Dau. of Hannah Stanyan. Jenkins, AbigailMaiden, Apr. 21, 1760In family of Hezikiah Blanchard. Jenks, RichardLynn, Apr. 2
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 18., Turell Tufts and his family connections. (search)
ncord's representative, 1788-1791. As the success of the American cause grew his feelings became less ardent for the Tory side. In Brooks' History of Medford a very interesting story is told of a slave of Ingraham's son Nathaniel. Several of Duncan's children made their names known in the world in various ways. A daughter married an Episcopal clergyman. Another daughter married an Englishman and her daughter was the mother of Captain Marryat, the English novelist. Another son, Duncan jDuncan junior, was a merchant in Boston. The Acts and Resolves of the Province of Massachusetts Bay, Vol. V, gives Duncan Ingraham, Jr., as one of the signers of a petition to Governor Hutchinson, May, 1773, in regard to auctioneers selling goods at private sale. Boston records show that he was chosen one of the clerks of the market, March 14, 1774, and also on March 29, 1776, when he was excused. His name is found on the rolls of 1772 of the Boston Cadets, and he was clerk of the company in 1774
the Company. Then follow letters concerning Hancock's removal by Gage, a letter by Hancock stating his dismissal, the company's notice of the same, Hancock's and Gage's letters. We may presume from the office he occupied at this time that Duncan junior's political sentiments were not like his father's. Nathaniel Ingraham had a son named Duncan who excited admiration for his espousal of the cause of the Hungarian refugee Martin Koszta, in 1854, when as commander of a United States slooDuncan who excited admiration for his espousal of the cause of the Hungarian refugee Martin Koszta, in 1854, when as commander of a United States sloop of war he sheltered the refugee and cleared the deck for action in the harbor of Trieste. It is said this act is proudly remembered by naval officers. For rescuing this Hungarian so boldly he gained a world notoriety and popularity, and was presented by the working classes of England with a chronometer inscribed, Presented to Captain Ingraham, of the United States Navy, by some thousands of the British working classes, for his noble conduct in rescuing Martin Koszta, the Hungarian refugee, f
Respite of Totty. -- We are informed that Governor Letcher has granted a respite to Wm. D. Totty, until the 9th of November. The consideration that the prisoner needed time to prepare for his doom, was sufficient to induce the Executive to consent to an extension of the period for a few days. Since his sentence, Totty has been visited by Rev. Messrs. Boggs and Duncan, from whose counsel, it is hoped, he will derive the benefit so essential to a man standing on the brink of eternity.
the Seamen's Bethel at Richmond, was taken up. Bishop Paine made numerous inquiries in relation to the Bethel, and afterwards said that he felt impelled to do so, because the Bethel in Mobile had been supplied by the Seaman's Aid Society, with a preacher who was a most dangerous and violent abolition incendiary. He was glad to hear that the appointment in Richmond was in the hands of the local society, and warmly commended it to the approval of the Conference. Messrs. Doggett and Duncan bore testimony to the efficiency and zeal of Mr. Boggs; and his character was passed, and relation continued. Rev. G. W. Langhorne, Presiding Elder of the Lynchburg District, said that during the year his district had many indications of mercy, and several gracious outpourings of the spirit. In reply to a question from Dr. Doggest, he said he regarded class meetings as essential to the maintenance of primitive Methodism. The present rage for Sabbath preaching had presented a great obs
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