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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Operations of Confederate States Navy in defence of New Orleans. (search)
sed that I am at a loss to determine against which of the three parties it is directed, viz: General Duncan, commanding both forts, but in the immediate command of Fort Jackson, the officer specially the exception of two guns out of place. It appears that a request, or order, was sent by General Duncan, commanding Fort Jackson, to Commander Mitchell, to change the position of the Louisiana to at such change of position would endanger the safety of the Louisiana. That in the position General Duncan desired the Louisiana to assume, she would have been in range of the mortar boats of the enek when the Louisiana was capable of doing so. That Commander Mitchell, when he heard that General Duncan, in command of Fort Jackson, had accepted the terms of surrender offered the day before by Captain Porter, United States navy, remonstrated with General Duncan against such course, but was told it was too late, as the flag of truce boat had already been sent. That the enemy appeared in ov
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.34 (search)
anded by Lieutenant George H. Snow, 33d North Carolina. There were also in the fort some supernumerary artillerymen, armed as Infantry, a section of Chew's Maryland battery, and small detachments from Harris' Mississippi brigade (under Lieutenant-Colonel Duncan), and from Thomas' Georgia brigade (under Captain William Norwood). The error of attributing this brilliant defence to Harris' brigade alone, doubtless arose from Lieutenant-Colonel Duncan of that brigade being the ranking officer in thLieutenant-Colonel Duncan of that brigade being the ranking officer in the fort. The incident of the wounded men loading and passing up the muskets to their comrades, is attested by officers in the fort, but I learn from General Lane's Ms. Report that, the ammunition giving out, the men used rocks with great effect. General Lane's report should by all means be published. On that night Petersburg was evacuated. But though time admonishes me to pass over in such brief fashion these last eventful days, duty bids me pause to make mention of two, who, everywher