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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 7 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for D. R. Duncan or search for D. R. Duncan in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
inspection reports. Colonel Thomas J. Simmons. Fourteenth Georgia, Major W. L. Goldsmith. Thirty-fifth Georgia, Lieutenant-Colonel W. H. McCullohs. Forty-fifth Georgia, Captain A. W. Gibson. Forty-ninth Georgia, Colonel John T. Jordan. McGowan's brigade. actual commanders given as shown by inspection reports. Brigadier-General Samuel McGowan. First South Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel A. P. Butler. Twelfth South Carolina, Captain R. M. Kerr. Thirteenth South Carolina, Captain D. R. Duncan. Fourteenth South Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel Edward Croft. Orr's Rifles, Major J. T. Robertson. Lane's brigade. actual commanders given as shown by inspection reports. Brigadier-General James H. Lane. Seventh North Carolina, Captain J. G. Harris. Eighteenth North Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel J. W. McGill. Twenty-eighth North Carolina, Major S. N. Stowe. Thirty-third North Carolina, Captain W. J. Callais. Thirty-seventh North Carolina, Colonel W. M. Barbour. Scale
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of General John Bankhead Magruder. (search)
l, Colonel Dimick was removed to another sphere of duty, and Colonel Magruder became his successor. He was well-fitted for the position to which he had been assigned. His early career in the light artillery service, in companionship with Bragg, Duncan, and Ridgely, impressed upon him a character for dashing and bold qualities, so necessary for the light artillery officers. On the fields of Pallo Alto, Reseca de la Palma and Buena Vista, and the Valley of Mexico, the brilliant exploits of the ed Hunt, Barry, and some others, in the enjoyment of distinguished reputations. The light artillery of the United States before the Mexican war was held in but small estimation, but the brilliant service of the batteries of Magruder, Bragg and Duncan during that war raised it to a high degree of popularity, and subsequently, through the influence of the military academy at West Point and the artillery schools at Old Point and Leavenworth, the Federal and Confederate artillery of America acqui
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The monument at Munfordsville. (search)
he intervening time between the battle of Shiloh and Bragg's Kentucky campaign, we come to speak of Colonel Smith in his last battle,—the one here,—known as the battle of Munfordsville, fought September 14, 1862. Immediately prior to entering Kentucky Colonel Smith had been ordered to resume command of his regiment. On reaching Glasgow with his main force September 12, 1862, General Bragg ordered forward the same night Chalmers's brigade of Mississippians to the railroad at Cave City, and Duncan's Louisiana brigade to the junction next south, with instructions to intercept and cut Buell's communications by rail with Louisville. General Chalmers surprised and captured the telegraph operator and depot of supplies at Cave City, but, because information as to our movements had been, in some manner, communicated to the Federals, he did not succeed in capturing any train. Hearing that a force of the enemy, supposed to be raw recruits, but in reality numbering, as we afterward found, lar