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cefully, despite the urgent appeals of Assistant Adjutant-General Dunham, of their own brigade, and myself. Abeg that they may be suitably rewarded, and that Captain Dunham and Lieutenant Wright be promoted for their galrigade. Of this I informed you. About this time Capt. Dunham, A. A.G. of the First New-Jersey brigade, brough I promised to do all I could. Shortly after, Captain Dunham, A. A.G., came to my assistance. I requested h I desire to particularly notice the conduct of Captain Dunham, A. A.G., First New-Jersey brigade, whose exertd by six companies of the Fiftieth Indiana, under Col. Dunham, who had come up on the railroad from Louisville, man slightly wounded. After the night closed, Colonel Dunham, being the ranking officer, assumed command, annel Commanding U. S. Forces at Green River. Colonel Dunham's report. Louisville, Ky., September 30, 1eto hereinbefore noticed. I am, respectfully, C. L. Dunham, Colonel Commanding United States Forces at Gree
m to retire, and retire they did most disgracefully, despite the urgent appeals of Assistant Adjutant-General Dunham, of their own brigade, and myself. About this time Lieut. Wright, of the Fourth N— all of the Fourth New-Jersey regiment. I beg that they may be suitably rewarded, and that Captain Dunham and Lieutenant Wright be promoted for their gallantry. I have little else to add to the rep commanded to form on the left of the First brigade. Of this I informed you. About this time Capt. Dunham, A. A.G. of the First New-Jersey brigade, brought back the word that they had received no sucd for God's sake to prevent another Bull Run. I promised to do all I could. Shortly after, Captain Dunham, A. A.G., came to my assistance. I requested him to take a horse and go to head off the ret by great exertion, but too late for action. I desire to particularly notice the conduct of Captain Dunham, A. A.G., First New-Jersey brigade, whose exertions to rally the broken columns of his briga
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 121.-surrender of Munfordville, Ky. (search)
unded. I gave them leave to do so. At nine A. M., I was reinforced by six companies of the Fiftieth Indiana, under Col. Dunham, who had come up on the railroad from Louisville, and were thrown off the track six miles back. At daylight they push of the river, and getting into the works without any loss, except one man slightly wounded. After the night closed, Colonel Dunham, being the ranking officer, assumed command, and will, no doubt, make a report of the events occurring on Monday and ver. I have the honor to be, your ob't servant, J. T. Wilder, Colonel Commanding U. S. Forces at Green River. Colonel Dunham's report. Louisville, Ky., September 30, 1862. To the A. A. General and Chief of Staff of the Army of Kentucky: en named by Colonel Wilder in his report, and the reinforcements thereto hereinbefore noticed. I am, respectfully, C. L. Dunham, Colonel Commanding United States Forces at Green River. N. B.--It is probably but just both to Major-General Gi
conflict. The rebels were estimated by captured officers and men to be eight thousand strong. Their loss will approximate five hundred killed and wounded. Among them is a colonel of a Mississippi regiment. The rebels engaged in burying the dead stated to our men that they had lost six hundred men. The story of the wounded major is probably nearest the truth, and it may be safely said that their loss will reach that number. Our loss was eight killed and twenty wounded. Among the killed is Major Abbott, of the Sixty-seventh Indiana regiment. By a person who left Munfordsville late last evening, Col. Dunham sent word that the rebel loss was over five hundred. We have taken ono hundred and ten stand of small arms and two pieces of artillery, six-pounders. Thus, upon the field made glorious by the Indianians, under Willich, have Indianians won the second battle of Munfordsville, and, in shedding lustre on the national arms, added new honors to the State from which they hail.