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General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant, Chapter 2 (search)
o General Grant by his conduct in the Vicksburg campaign, and was there placed on his staff, and served in the adjutant-general's department. Captain George K. Leet, assistant adjutant-general, who had come East with General Grant from the Army of the Tennessee, and who was assigned to duty at the headquarters of the army in Washington, and remained there during the campaign. Captain H. W. Janes, assistant quartermaster. Captain Peter T. Hudson, a volunteer officer from the State of Iowa, had served with the general in the West, and was retained as an aide-de-camp. Lieutenant William McKee Dunn, Jr., a beardless boy of nineteen, was assigned as an acting aide-de-camp to General Rawlins, but performed general staff duty at headquarters, and under many trying circumstances proved himself as cool and gallant as the most experienced veteran. All the members of the staff had had abundant experience in the field, and were young, active, and ready for any kind of hard work.
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant, Chapter 9 (search)
rything I have, and murder me afo‘ morning, if you don't give me some protection. Oh, replied the general, we will see that you are not hurt ; and turning to Lieutenant Dunn of the staff, he said: Dunn, you had better go and stay in the old lady's house to-night. You can probably make yourself more comfortable there than in campDunn, you had better go and stay in the old lady's house to-night. You can probably make yourself more comfortable there than in camp, anyhow; and I don't want her to be frightened. Dunn followed the old woman rather reluctantly to her house, and played guardian angel to her till the next morning. General Grant had now presented to him for solution a very formidable military problem. Lee's position, from the strength and location of his intrenchments anDunn followed the old woman rather reluctantly to her house, and played guardian angel to her till the next morning. General Grant had now presented to him for solution a very formidable military problem. Lee's position, from the strength and location of his intrenchments and the defensive character of the country, was impregnable, or at least it could not be carried by assault without involving great loss of life. The general had therefore decided to withdraw, and make another movement by the left flank, in the hope of so manoeuvering as to afford another opportunity of getting a chance to strike L
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant, Chapter 19 (search)
rring up the dust in every direction. What's that youngster doing there? cried the general, manifesting no little anxiety; and turning to the junior aide, added, Dunn, I wish you would take him to the rear, and put him where he will be safe. But Jesse had too much of his sire's blood in his veins to yield a prompt compliance, and at first demurred. Dunn, however, took hold of Little Reb's bridle, and started him on a gallop toward the river; and the boy, much to his mortification, had to beat an ignominious retreat. Dunn was more troubled than any one else over this masterly retrograde movement, for he was afraid that the troops who saw him breaking Dunn was more troubled than any one else over this masterly retrograde movement, for he was afraid that the troops who saw him breaking for the rear under fire might think that he had suddenly set too high a value on his life, and was looking out for a safe place. After the capture of the works by Birney's troops, the general-in-chief rode over to Fort Harrison to push matters in that direction. He was greatly gratified at the handsome manner in which the for
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant, Chapter 24 (search)
me some time to persuade him that these appendages to his heels would not particularly facilitate his movements in climbing aboard gunboats. A third officer, Lieutenant Dunn, was sent to communicate with a gunboat stationed at some distance from the others. In the mean time orders were given to tow coal-schooners up the river, reMrs. Grant soon after came in, and was anxious to know about the situation. It was certainly an occasion upon which a woman's curiosity was entirely justifiable. Dunn had returned with a report about the movement of the gunboat with which he had been sent to communicate, and Ingalls had also rejoined the party. Mrs. Grant, in I better do? The general looked at her for a moment, and then replied in a half-serious and half-teasing way, Well, the fact is, Julia, you ought n't to be here. Dunn now spoke up and said: Let me have the ambulance hitched up, and drive Mrs. Grant back into the country far enough to be out of reach of the shells. Oh, their gu
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 4: seditious movements in Congress.--Secession in South Carolina, and its effects. (search)
on, of Virginia; Charles Francis Adams, of Massachusetts; W. Winslow, of North Carolina; James Humphreys, of New York; Wm. W. Boyce, of South Carolina; James H. Campbell, of Pennsylvania; Peter E. Love, of Georgia; Orris S. Ferry, of Connecticut; Henry Winter Davis, of Maryland; C. Robinson, of Rhode Island; W. G. Whiteley, of Delaware; M. W. Tappen, of New Hampshire; John L. N. Stratton, of New Jersey; F. M. Bristow, of Kentucky; J. S. Morrill, of Vermont; T. A. R. Nelson, of Tennessee; Wm. McKee Dunn, of Indiana; Miles Taylor, of Louisiana; Reuben Davis, of Mississippi; William Kellogg, of Illinois; George S. Houston, of Alabama; F. H. Morse, of Maine; John S. Phelps, of Missouri; Albert Rust, of Arkansas; William A. Howard, of Michigan; George S. Hawkins, of Florida; A. J. Hamilton, of Texas; C. C. Washburn, of Wisconsin; S. R. Curtis, of Iowa; John C. Burch, of California; William Winslow, of Minnesota; and Lansing Stout, of Oregon. The Speaker, in framing this Committee, chose co
State which should pass an act impairing or defeating the operation of the Fugitive Slave law should thereupon be deprived of her right of representation in Congress. Mr. Charles H. Larrabee, of Wisconsin, proposed a Convention of the States. All these projects were referred to the Grand Select Committee aforesaid. That Committee, December 13th, after four days earnest deliberation, united in a resolve, moved by Mr. Justin S. Morrill, of Vermont, as a substitute for one moved by Mr. William McKee Dunn, of Indiana, affirming the necessity of proffering to the Slave States additional and more special guarantees of their peculiar rights and interests. Mr. Morrill's affirmation was as follows: Resolved, That, in the opinion of the Committee, the existing discontents among the Southern people, and the growing hostility among them to the Federal Government, are greatly to be regretted; and that any reasonable, proper, and constitutional remedies, necessary to preserve the peace of
Julian, Kelley, Francis W. Kellogg, William Kellogg, Lansing, Loomis, Lovejoy, McKean. Mitchell, Justin S. Morrill, Olin, Pot-ter, Alex. H. Rice, Edward H. Rollins, Sedgwick, Sheffield, Shellabarger, Sherman, Sloan, Spaulding, Stevens, Benj. F. Thomas, Train, Van Horne, Verree, Wallace, Charles W. Walton, E. P. Walton, Wheeler, Albert S. White, and Windom--60. Nays--Messrs. Allen, Ancona, Joseph Baily, George H. Browne, Burnett, Calvert, Cox, Cravens, Crisfield, Crittenden, Diven, Dunlap, Dunn, English, Fouke, Grider, Haight, Hale, Harding, Holman, Horton, Jackson, Johnson, Law, May, McClernand, McPherson, Mallory, Menzies, Morris, Noble, Norton, Odell, Pendleton, Porter, Reid, Robinson, James S. Rollins, Sheil, Smith, John B. Steele, Stratton, Francis Thomas, Vallandigham, Voorhees, Wadsworth, Webster, and Wickliffe--48. The bill, thus amended, being returned to the Senate, Mr. Trumbull moved a concurrence in the house amendment, which prevailed by the following vote: Yeas
s reply to Breckinridge, 441 ; vote cast for him in Kentucky, 492 ; said to have complained that the South were too easily satisfied, 512. Dow, William, shot dead in Kansas, 241. Downs, of La., denounces Clay's measures, 205. Dranesville, battle of, 625-6. Drayton, Commander E., at Port Royal, 605. Drayton, Gen. T., (Rebel,) at Port Royal, 605. Drywood, Mo., skirmish at, 585. Dug Spring, Mo., Rebels defeated at, 577. Dumont, Col. Philippi, 522 ; Carrick's ford, 523. Dunn, Wm. M., of Ind., Peace project of, 374. Du Pont, Com. Samuel F., 604; bombards the Port Royal forts, 604; Rebels surrender to, 605; 627. Duryea, Col. 11. B., 529; at Little Bethel, 531. E. Earle, Thomas, biographer of Benj. Lundy. 115. early, Col., (Rebel,) at Bull Run, 543. East Tennessee, Declaration of Grievances by the people of, 4,3-4; Unionism in; persecution by the Rebels, 484; her expectations from our forces in Kentucky, 616; her hopes blasted by Schoepf's retreat