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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 12 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 9 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Allan Pinkerton, The spy in the rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion, revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public, compiled from official reports prepared for President Lincoln , General McClellan and the Provost-Marshal-General . 7 7 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 6, 1861., [Electronic resource] 7 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 14, 1860., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 17, 1860., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
John G. B. Adams, Reminiscences of the Nineteenth Massachusetts Regiment 6 6 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Dunn or search for Dunn in all documents.

Your search returned 14 results in 3 document sections:

ttee on Military Affairs. On the thirteenth, Mr. Dunn, of Indiana, reported it back without amendmear as the same were applicable. On motion of Mr. Dunn, of Indiana, the bill was amended by adding atee of conference, and Mr. Olin, of New-York, Mr. Dunn, of Indiana, and Mr. G. H. Browne, of Rhode I the House, on the twenty-third, on motion of Mr. Dunn, of Indiana, the bill was taken from the Speay, in opposition to the passage of the bill. Mr. Dunn, of Indiana, declared that the necessity was before he entered such service. On motion of Mr. Dunn, of Indiana, the bill was so amended as to prn the House, on the thirteenth of June, 1862, Mr. Dunn, of Indiana, from the Committee on Military A was considered and recommitted, on motion of Mr. Dunn, to the Military Committee, with leave to report at any time. On the ninth of July, Mr. Dunn reported it back with amendments, which were concure of conference, and appointed Mr. McPherson, Mr. Dunn, of Indiana, and Mr. Mallory, of Kentucky, ma[1 more...]
o fall back and move their battery still further down the levee; after which skirmishing was kept up until some three hours after the firing had ceased along our entire line, at which time I received your order to fall back slowly on the Grant Mill road, which I succeeded in doing without losing any men after I left the battle-field. The loss in my regiment in the engagement was four killed and eight wounded--one mortally, two seriously, and five slightly. For particulars I refer you to Dr. Dunn, surgeon of my regiment. The officers and men of my regiment and battery deserve great credit for gallantry and courage displayed on that day. Very respectfully, Your obedient servant, arch. S. Dobbins, Colonel, commanding Regiment Cavalry. Report of Colonel Newton. headquarters Newton's regiment Arkansas cavalry, camp at Gist's, Phillips county, Arkansas, July 8, 1863. Captain J. C. Alexander, A. A. G. Walker's Division, &c., in the Field: Captain: I have the honor, in
bingdon with a force composed of the 54th Virginia, six hundred men; the 29th Virginia, four hundred and twenty men (four companies, wholly recruits, three raised by me this spring, and one by Lieutenant March); the 5th Kentucky, five hundred men; Dunn's battalion of recruits, four hundred men; Bradley's Mounted Kentucky Rifles, about two hundred and seventy-five men — making an aggregate of two thousand one hundred and ninety-five men, to which, add Jeffree's battery of six pieces, manned by reanders were arranging for a new assault. As everything had to be left to them, under such circumstances, I waited about half a mile from town, placing my battery in position at once, to command the town and our road. I supported the battery with Dunn's battalion. After a while I was informed that the enemy had fled before us, leaving his tents, clothes, swords, officers' uniforms, and even the lights burning in his tents. It is probable had we not halted before nightfall, we might have cap