Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Samuel F. Dupont or search for Samuel F. Dupont in all documents.

Your search returned 30 results in 10 document sections:

Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 36. battle of Port Royal, S. C. Fought November 7, 1861. (search)
very respectfully, your obedient servant, S. F. Dupont, Flag-officer Commanding South Atlantic Blon they have been called upon to suppress. S. F. Dupont, Flag-officer Commanding South Atlantic Blo be, respectfully, your obedient servant, S. F. Dupont, Flag-officer Commanding United States Atlh. Respectfully, your obedient servant, S. F. Dupont, Flag-officer Commanding United States Atlmy forces, respectively commanded by Flag-officer S. F. Dupont, and Brigadier-General T. W. Shermanlds, Commanding Battalion Marines. Flag-officer Samuel F. Dupont, Commanding U. S. Naval Expeditiong is a portion of a private letter from Flag-officer Dupont to the Assistant Secretary of the Navy:th target-practice, too fast to count. Commodore Dupont had kindly made me his aid. I stood by hi to give them Hatteras. In the mean time Capt. Dupont was pitching into two batteries--one on theother, the frigate Wabash, the flag-ship of Com. Dupont, in the van. As the long line of formidable[3 more...]
fleet, the advance ships of which did not heave in sight until the following morning. On the arrival of the Wabash, Commodore Dupont ordered us to leave the Brandywine and run down to Savannah in search of the frigate Sabine, which we had orders to . At half-past 4 this morning the signal gun for getting under way was fired from the U. S. steam-frigate Wabash, Commodore Dupont commanding. At five there was a general weighing of anchors, and the Wabash steamed out at half-past 5. As theome down to join his vessel, the Flag, now blockading off Charleston, and had been acting during the fight as aid to Commodore Dupont, was assigned the duty of taking the flag ashore. Himself and crew were unarmed, but they found no one to receive tthe military was beginning to display itself, when a grand council of war was held on the Wabash, (the fla-ship of Corn. Dupont,) at which Generals Sherman, Viele, Stevens, and Wright were present, soon after which, on Wednesday evening, it was whis
Fort Walker, Port Royal harbor, S. C., November 11, 1861. On Saturday noon last, in pursuance of the orders of Flag-officer Dupont, the gunboats Seneca, Lieutenant-Commanding David Ammen; Pembina, Lieutenant-Commanding John Bankhead, and the Curs a force of about a thousand men. On these facts being known to Captain Ammen, he returned, and reported them to Commodore Dupont, who immediately ordered the Unadilla, Captain Collins, the senior officer of the gunboats, to proceed to Beaufort aproperty secured to all. We have not heard from the Unadilla as yet, but there will be no more excesses committed if Commodore Dupont and the forces under his control can prevent it; and I am sure that General Sherman is controlled by the same sense ssured its success. Instead of fighting the forts at anchor, and exposed to their enfilading fire in the channel, Flag-officer Dupont steamed the entire squadron through the passage and attacked the batteries in flank from the inside of the bay, th
s, three boxes starch, twenty-five boxes tin, one hundred and twenty boxes coffee, twenty barrels potatoes, three hundred and fifty pigs of lead, thirty bags of shot, one box shoes, six bags arrow root, one case pistols, (revolvers,) and two cases of cavalry swords. The Mabel was formerly named the John W. Anderson, of Baltimore, as appears by the certificate of registry given at Nassau, N. P., found among his papers. She had no clearance from the port of Havana. The character of her cargo — part of it contraband — and her position as above given, seem to be strong presumptive evidence of her intention to run the blockade. I have therefore sent her to Philadelphia in charge of Master's Mate Levi Lane, of the United States steamer Dale, and seven men of that ship, for adjudication. I have the honor to be, sir, respectfully your obedient servant, S. F. Dupont, Flag-officer Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washingto
of Forts Walker and Beauregard, and is a direct fruit of the victory of the 7th. By the fall of Tybee Island, the reduction of Fort Pulaski, which is within easy mortar distance, becomes only a question of time. The rebels have themselves placed sufficient obstructions in the river at Fort Pulaski, and thus, by the cooperation of their own fears with our efforts, the harbor of Savannah is effectually closed. I have the honor to be, sir, respectfully, your most obedient servant, S. F. Dupont, Flag-officer Commanding South Atlantic Block'g Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. The following account of the occupation is given by an officer of the expedition: U. S. Ship Pocahontas, at the anchorage, Savannah harbor, Tybee Island, Nov. 24, 1861. The steamer Flag, Commander John Rodgers, was despatched by Flag-officer Dupont to reconnoitre this. point and ascertain the position and strength of the rebels. He did so, and on his return to Port Royal he
Doc. 201. reconnoissance at Port Royal. Commander Drayton's report. United States steamer Pawnee, Port Royal harbor, Nov. 25, 1861. Flag-Officer S. F. Dupont: sir: In obedience to instructions contained in your letter of the 24th instant, I left this harbor at three A. M. of the 25th inst., in company with the Unadilla, Lieutenant Commanding Collins, and the Pembina, Lieutenant Commanding Bankhead, piloted by the Vixen, Captain Boutelle. We crossed this bar at half-past 4, and that of St. Helena at half-past 9--a steamer, supposed to be the General Clinch, being then off the Edisto River, which position she shortly left, and steamed up the river. I soon afterward came in sight of a fort on the point of Otter Island, into which, at the distance of a mile, I threw a few shells, as did the gunboats, to discover if it were occupied. There being no answer, I sent a boat on shore to take possession, and found it to be a regular triangular work, with two faces toward the w
ich will be released and employed on blockading duty as soon as Otter and Tybee Islands are held by the army. Very respectfully, your most obedient servant, S. F. Dupont, Flag-Officer Commanding. United States flagship Wabash, Port Royal harbor, S. C. December 6, 1861. sir: I have the honor to inform the department that theed in the coast survey memoirs and reports. I attach the highest value to this possession. I have the honor to be sir, respectfully, your obedient servant, S. F. Dupont, Flag-Officer Commanding. Report of Commander C. R. P, Rogers. United States flagship Wabash, Port Royal harbor, December 6, 1861. sir: On yesterdading Stevens for the most earnest, cordial, and efficient co-operation, and also Lieutenant Commanding Ammen and Bankhead, whose vessels were always in the right place, and always well handled. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, C. R. P. Rogers, Commander. Flag-Officer S. F. Dupont, Commanding.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 221. Ashepoo River expedition. (search)
und, and thinking it important to get the Unadilla as soon as possible to a place where her engines could be repaired, I determined this morning to tow that vessel to Port Royal harbor, which I have done, reaching here in company with the Vixen at half-past 7 this evening. In obedience to your instructions, before leaving, I transferred the charge of the fort and adjacent waters, to Lieutenant-Commanding Nicholson, who, with the Isaac Smith and Dale, will remain there until he receives further orders from yourself. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, P. Drayton, Commander. Flag-officer S. F. Dupont, Commanding South Atlantic Squadron, Port Royal Harbor. As about one hundred and forty negroes, most of them in a very destitute condition, had collected at Otter Island before my departure, I directed Lieutenant Nicholson to see that they were supplied with food, until some disposition would be made of them, or until he heard from you. Very respectfully, P. Drayton.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 224. expedition to Ossabaw, Ga. (search)
steamed up it about four miles to Morrell's plantation and Ossibaw Island, where I landed, but found it abandoned. There are no batteries on Ossabaw Island for the defence of the Sound. I saw Vernonsburg, but could observe no battery, save the one off Green Island. We saw over land two or three schooners at the head of Warsaw Sound, which had probably passed from Ossabaw through Romilly Marshes. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, C. P. R. Rodgers, Commander. To Flag-officer S. F. Dupont. Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. A writer on board one of the vessels composing the expedition relates the following: United States gunboat Ottawa, Port Royal, S. C., Dec. 11, 1861. A third of the series of important reconnoissances projected by Flag-officer Dupont, for the purpose of ascertaining the practicability of penetrating, by our light draught gunboats, the internal waters of the rebel coast, and then, by cutting off the illicit commerce of the
the troops who had left the encampment at Rockville, being largely reinforced, showed a disposition to reoccupy that place. As the weather was too threatening to permit of my making a careful examination of the Stoco, as I intended, I determined now to return at once to this place and report to you the state of affairs at the North Edisto. This I have done, reaching my anchorage here at three o'clock to-day. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, P. Drayton, Commanding. Flag-officer S. F. Dupont, Commanding South Atlantic Squadron. A secession account. The following appeared in the Charleston Courier: Gardner's corner, S. C., December 19, 1861. About half-past 1 o'clock yesterday afternoon one of the enemy's gunboats passed by Port Royal ferry. Our batteries opened fire upon her, striking her three times. Upon meeting with this rather hot reception she steamed rapidly past, and ran aground about three miles the other side of the ferry. As soon as our tro