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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 56 10 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 49 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 38 12 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 35 3 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 6 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 23, 1861., [Electronic resource] 18 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 17 1 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 13 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 11 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Dupont or search for Dupont in all documents.

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bting thought or a doubting word, Or idle speculation; But a spirit of inspiring trust Filled each man's breast, as it always must, When leaders are brave, and a cause is just And ours the cause of the nation. And thus we went — the hurricane's breath Was felt in our track, like the blast of death, But we had no thought of turning; Onward and onward the good fleet sped, Locked in its breast the secret dread, To break in gloom over treason's head, Where — we should soon be learning. But brave Dupont and Sherman knew Where the bolt should light, and each gallant crew Was ready to heed their orders. Port Royal, Ho!--and a bright warm day, We made the land many miles away, And sullenly there before us lay Fierce Carolina's borders. The mystery was all compassed then, And the hearts of sea-sick, weary men, Cheered up, the prospect viewing; There is that grit in the human mind, However gentle, or good, or kind, That is always to double its fist inclined, When near where a fight is brewing. T
e coasts, and the bays of New England, so far, at least, as Cape Cod. The numbers and hostility of the savages led him to delay a removal, since his colonists were so few. Yet the purpose remained. Thrice in the spring of the following year did Dupont, his lieutenant, attempt to complete the discovery. Thrice he was driven back by adverse winds, and at the third time his vessel was wrecked. Poutrincourt, who had visited France, and was now returned with supplies, renewed the design; but meetis on the shoals of Cape Cod, he, too, returned to Port Royal. Thus the first settlement on the American Continent had been made--two years before James River was discovered, and three years before a cabin had been raised in Canada. The name of Dupont in connection with a naval expedition at Port Royal, in 1605, and with another and greater two hundred and fifty years later, is one of those curious coincidences in which the muse of history loves to indulge. If the first had succeeded in his e
63. the Port Royal dance. by R. S. Burk, A Seaman on Board of the Vandalia. Behold, our glorious banner floats gaily in the air; But four hours since, base traitors swore we could not plant it there; But brave Dupont he led us on, to fight the vaunting foe, And soon the rebel standard was in the dust laid low. When we were seen advancing, they laughed with foolish pride, Saying that soon our Northern fleet they'd sink beneath the tide; And with their guns trained carefully, they waited our advance, And the gallant Wabash soon struck up the music for the dance. The Susquehanna next in line delivered her broadside; With deadly aim each shot was sent, and well each gun was plied; And still our gallant ships advanced, and each one, as she passed, Poured in her deadly messengers, and foes fell thick and fast. Each ship advanced in order, each commander wore a smile, Until the famed Vandalia brought up the rear in style; And as our guns were shortest, we balanced to the right, Whi
st; How might survive the crews, the spar, the mast, Before that fearful hail! XI. Yet all in vain! The star-flag still arose, Nailed to each mast, a target for its foes; The rough tars cheer, and on each frigate goes In undismay'd career; Stern Dupont leads his Wabash to the goal, And Pawnee, Susquehanna, Seminole, And stout Bienville their dread thunders roll, 'Mid shout and battle-cheer. XII. Stern Dupont, in that tempest's very midst, Through lurid flames, and the artillery's mist, Where cDupont, in that tempest's very midst, Through lurid flames, and the artillery's mist, Where crash'd the ball, and hurtling bullets hiss'd, The noble frigate led. For three long, bloody hours, he stubborn sto Environed by that fierce and fiery flood; While blush'd his decks with bubbling, loyal blood, With scuppers chok'd and red. XIII. Three times that triple dance he fearless led; Three times that circuit, that ellipse so dread; Three times, 'mid splintering spar and falling dead, He led the merciless path; Three times his frigates and his gunboats well Replied with hot-shot and with