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artillerist was brought into play with remarkable effect. In company with Colonel Dutton, commanding his Third brigade, (an officer of engineers,) he selected positine of the Jericho, under General Harland, and that of the Nansemond, under Colonel Dutton. The vast labors performed by Getty's division during the three weeks of the drawbridge and advanced up the Providence Church road. Simultaneously Colonel Dutton was directed to cross two small columns six or eight miles lower down, and dark) they stole away while our weary troops rested on the field. Meantime Colonel Dutton had sent the Twenty-first Connecticut with a section of artillery and a dozranch to the Nansemond, where he bivouacked under cover of the gunboats. Colonel Dutton with a small force crossed in row-boats at Hill's point. After advancing ah engaged the enemy the greater part of the day without important results. Colonel Dutton thus continued the action with the expectation that he would soon be joined
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 1: operations in Virginia.--battle of Chancellorsville.--siege of Suffolk. (search)
eral Getty was intrusted the river line below Onondaga battery (see map on page 42), the key of the position, extending about eight miles in length. During the siege General Getty stormed and carried, with the Eighth Connecticut and Eighty-ninth New York, aided by Lieutenant Lamson and the gun-boats, a Confederate battery on the west branch of the Nansemond. He captured 6 guns and 200 prisoners. General Peck mentioned with commendation Generals Corcoran, Terry, Dodge, and Harland, and Colonels Dutton and Gibbs, commanding front lines; Colonels Gurney and Waddrop, commanding reserves; Colonels Spear and Onderdonk, of the cavalry. and Captain Follet. chief of artillery. The forts were in charge of the following officers: Fort Union, Colonel Drake; Nansernond, Colonel Hawkins; Halleck, Colonel Sullivan; Draw-bridge Battery, Colonel Davis; Battery Mansfield, Colonel Worth; the Redan and Battery Sosecrans, Colonel Thorpe; Battery Massachusetts, Captain Johnspn; Battery Montgomery, Colo
st, that it would have the semblance of a repulse here; and, secondly, that if we could force our way across the creek, we would gain valuable time over the other plan. These considerations, which I know would occur to you, were, therefore, unnecessary to mention. The suggestions were made, so far as I was concerned, merely to call your attention to a plan which seemed to me to possess merit. I am happy to state that General Gillmore's idea received the sanction of General Weitzel and Colonel Dutton. I have made this long explanation for peculiar and private reasons, and can only say in conclusion, that as I have never before been accused of infirmity of purpose, I shall not take the charge as one seriously affecting my military reputation. I had forgotten to mention that the letter was not drawn up or signed by me as a formal protest, but only in a semi-informal manner and in the quickest time of conveying to you the ideas which had been discussed by General Gillmore and myself.
teenth of September, all the regiments of the First brigade, except the One Hundred and Fifth, having moved down to Atlanta, this command, in connection with the Twenty-sixth Wisconsin infantry, performed duty at the river. Strong works were prepared, and the utmost vigilance exercised to guard against guerrillas and marauders, who infested the country thereabouts. Colonel Dustin assumed command of the brigade, in the absence of Colonel Harrison, on the eighteenth September, when Lieutenant-Colonel Dutton commanded the regiment, until the ninth October, when, having received leave of absence, he left for Illinois; since his absence I have had command. While lying at the river, frequent details were made for foraging purposes. The First brigade, having moved back from Atlanta on first October, all the regiments furnished men for foraging parties. On the twenty-fourth of October, I was sent out in charge of a party of five hundred and fifty men, and a train of wagons, to be gone th
f the Dorsey machine sweeping in a general horizontal direction across the quadrantal platform. 1857. Crook introduced an arrangement of driving-gears of unequal size to be used separately for changing the rapidity of vibration of the cutters. 1860. The Henderson rake, or what is known as the wood machine, having a chain below the platform which carries the rake in a curved path. 1861. The Sieberling dropper, which is a slatted platform that vibrates to discharge the gavel. 1861. Dutton inclosed the gearing in a metallic case, forming a part of the main frame. Plate XLVI. shows three forms of the Whiteley Champion harvester of Springfield, Ohio. The upper figure is the mowing-machine; below it is the reaping-machine, with dropping arrangement, which deposits the gavel behind the cutter-bar; the lower figure is the self-raking reaper. The reaping and automatic binding-machine of S. D. Locke, of Hoosick Falls, N. Y., made by Walter A. Wood of that place, and shown in
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 19. the siege of Suffolk, Virginia. (search)
He skirmished all the way to Reed's Ferry, capturing sixteen prisoners, and then returned to the river, under the cover of the gunboats. At the same time Colonel Dutton crossed in boats and occupied Hill's Point with the Fourth Rhode Island, a portion of the One Hundred and Seventeenth New York, and a detachment from the Commrendered every assistance in their power in crossing the river. Lieutenant Cushing sent a boat, howitzer, and detachment, with the Fourth Rhode Island, under Colonel Dutton. I regret to state that Colonel Ringgold, of the One Hundred and Third New York, lost his life from two wounds, while leading on his men in the most gallanh the enemy. It can be regarded only as an unfortunate termination of a hitherto brilliant career of service. To Generals Corcoran, Terry, Dodge, Harland, Colonels Dutton and Gibbs, commanding fronts lines; Colonels Spear and Onderdonk, of the cavalry; Colonels Gurney and Waddrop, commanding reserves, and Captain Follett, Chief
nt despatches for the Tacony to proceed at once from Little Washington to Plymouth. Before these despatches arrived, Colonel Dutton, Chief of my Staff, had procured the sailing of the Tacony for Plymouth-going on board himself. Colonel Dutton also Colonel Dutton also suggested to General Harland that he should send the steamer Pilot-boy with the Seventeenth Massachusetts volunteers to Plymouth, but General Harland did not feel at liberty to do so, in view of his situation. All the information received by both nfantry, to pass with comparative security in dark and stormy weather. Upon an examination with General Palmer and Colonel Dutton, something was deemed essential for the Trent side. This conviction was greatly strengthened by the information thatelement, and the expectation of an early attack, decided that a slight extension of Amory was imperatively demanded. Colonel Dutton, one of the most accomplished Engineers in the service, and of great experience, has looked after this work. It will
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Fortifications and their Armaments. (search)
These works are located upon the high ground where the bank is bluff, permitting a flotilla of small boats, or a column of infantry, to pass with comparative security in dark and stormy weather. Upon an examination with General Palmer and Colonel Dutton, something was deemed essential for the Trent side. This conviction was greatly strengthened by the information that the officers do not like to have their gunboats in the Trent. The absence of the naval element, and the expectation of an early attack, decided that a slight extension of Amory was imperatively demanded. Colonel Dutton, one of the most accomplished Engineers in the service, and of great experience, has looked after this work. It will command the Trent and have a cross-fire upon all the approaches to Fort Totten, besides making us independent of gunboats in that quarter. Ordnance. The preceding observations upon the general system of defence, apply with equal force to the armament of the fortifications.
James Redpath, The Public Life of Captain John Brown, Chapter 9: forty days in chains. (search)
letter to the Sheriff, requesting his body to be given to his wife after execution. At this stage of the dialogue a Presbyterian clergyman of this town, named Dutton, entered the jailer's dwelling, and requested to have his name reported to Mr. Brown, with a request for an interview if convenient. The message was delivered, but Mr. Brown declined an interview, on the ground that he was then too busy. Mr. Dutton then left. Reporter. What is it keeps him busy? Official. He is engaged in reading about two dozen letters, sent to him this morning. In declining an interview with Mr. Dutton, he desired that he (Mr. D.) be informed of his (Brown's) wiMr. Dutton, he desired that he (Mr. D.) be informed of his (Brown's) willingness to see him in the course of the day, and argue with him on the subject of religion. Reporter. What is generally the character of the letters sent to him? Official. They are generally letters of sympathy and condolence. Reporter. Does he receive any assuring him of a purpose to rescue him? Official. Yes; several
Lydia Maria Child, Isaac T. Hopper: a true life, Mary Holliday. (search)
umed name of Mary Holliday. She was honest, prudent, and industrious, and the family became much attached to her. She had not been there many months when her mistress obtained tidings of her, and went to Philadelphia, accompanied by a man named Dutton. She was arrested on the seventh of June, 1805 and taken before Matthew Lawler, who was then mayor. Isaac W. Morris immediately waited on Isaac T. Hopper to inform him of the circumstance, and they proceeded together to the mayor's office. DDutton, being examined as a witness, testified that he knew a mulatto named Fanny, who belonged to Mrs. Sears, and he believed the woman present, called Mary Holliday, was—that person. Mary denied that she was the slave of the claimant, or that her name was Fanny; but her agitation was very evident, though she tried hard to conceal it. Friend Hopper remarked to the mayor, This case requires testimony as strong as if the woman were on trial for her life, which is of less value than liberty. I
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