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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 6 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Duval, Gabriel, 1752-1844 (search)
Duval, Gabriel, 1752-1844 Statesman; born in Prince George county, Md., Dec. 6, 1752; was a member of Congress, 1794-96, when he resigned upon his appointment as judge of the Supreme Court of Maryland. In 1811 he was appointed to the United States Supreme Court and served until 1836, when he resigned. He died in Prince George county, March 6, 1844.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Supreme Court, United States (search)
Jersey1793-18061317451806 John Rutledge, South Carolina1795-95..17391800 Samuel Chase, Maryland1796-18111517411811 Oliver Ellsworth, Connecticut1796-1800417451807 Bushrod Washington, Virginia1798-18293117621829 Alfred Moore, North Carolina1799-1804517551810 John Marshall, Virginia1801-353417551835 William Johnson, South Carolina1804-343017711834 Brockholst Livingston, New York1806-231717571823 Thomas Todd, Kentucky1807-261917651826 Joseph Story, Massachusetts1811-453417791845 Gabriel Duval, Maryland1811-362517521844 Smith Thompson, New York1823-432017671843 Robert Trimble, Kentucky1826-28217771828 John McLean, Ohio1829-613217851861 Henry Baldwin, Pennsylvania1830-441417791844 James M. Wayne, Georgia1835-673217901867 Roger B. Taney, Maryland1836-642817771864 Philip B. Barbour, Virginia1836-41517831841 John Catron, Tennessee1837-652817861865 John McKinley, Alabama1837-521517801852 Peter V. Daniel, Virginia1841-601917851860 Samuel Nelson, New York1845-722717921873
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Maryland, (search)
ng the ballot for viva voce voting passed......Dec. 28, 1801 Legislature presents a sword and belt to George Washington Mann, of Maryland, one of two soldiers who planted the American flag on the walls of Derne, Tripoli......April 27, 1805 Several associations formed in Baltimore to encourage home manufacture and sale of domestic goods during the embargo against British vessels......1808 First number of Niles's register issued in Baltimore by Hezekiah Niles......Sept. 7, 1811 Gabriel Duval, of Maryland, appointed associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States......Nov. 18, 1811 Printing-office of the Federal Republican, an anti-war paper in Baltimore, destroyed by a mob June 22, 1812. They attack the house of the editor, A. C. Hanson, which was garrisoned, break into the jail, whither some of the assailed had been taken, and in the riot General Lingan is killed and others left for dead......July 28, 1812 British Admiral Cockburn with four ships-of — the
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 7: study in a law office.—Visit to Washington.—January, 1854, to September, 1834.—Age, 23. (search)
s with him, and who consequently has a separate table, though in the same house. I dined with them yesterday, being Sunday. Judges Marshall, Story, Thompson, and Duval were present, who, with myself, made up the company, with two waiters in attendance. Sunday here is a much gayer day than with us. No conversation is forbidden, anaturally taciturn, and yet ready to laugh; to joke and be joked with. Judge Thompson is a kind-hearted man, now somewhat depressed from the loss of his wife. Judge Duval is eighty-two Gabriel Duval, 1752-1844. He resigned Jan., 1835. years old, and is so deaf as to be unable to participate in conversation. I have spent coGabriel Duval, 1752-1844. He resigned Jan., 1835. years old, and is so deaf as to be unable to participate in conversation. I have spent considerable time in the Senate, to the floor of which I received an introduction from Mr. Webster; in other words, he gave me a card which gives me access at all times to the floor. The Senate is now employed entirely upon the deposits. This subject is directly before them by means of Mr. Webster's great report as Chairman of the