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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The battle of Franklin-the battle of Nashville (search)
further delay. Hood cannot even stand a drawn battle so far from his supplies of ordnance stores. If he retreats and you follow, he must lose his material and much of his army. I am in hopes of receiving a dispatch from you to-day announcing that you have moved. Delay no longer for weather or reinforcements. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General Washington, D. C. December 15, 1864 Major-General Thomas, Nashville, Tenn. I was just on my way to Nashville, but receiving a dispatch from Van Duzer detailing your splendid success of to-day, I shall go no further. Push the enemy now and give him no rest until he is entirely destroyed. Your army will cheerfully suffer many privations to break up Hood's army and render it useless for future operations. Do not stop for trains or supplies, but take them from the country as the enemy have done. Much is now expected. U. S. Grant, Lieutenant-General General Logan happening to visit City Point about that time, and knowing him as a
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant, Chapter 22 (search)
When he arrived there the next evening, as soon as the steamboat touched the wharf a despatch of the night before was shown him from Thomas to Halleck, saying that the enemy would be attacked in the morning; and also a telegram of the 15th from Van Duzer, a superintendent of the military telegraph-lines, announcing that Thomas had attacked the enemy early that morning, driving him back at all points. This was an incalculable relief to the general, and lifted a heavy load from his mind. He at once telegraphed Thomas: I was just on my way to Nashville, but receiving a despatch from Van Duzer detailing your splendid success of to-day, I shall go no farther. Push the enemy now, and give him no rest until he is entirely destroyed. Your army will cheerfully suffer many privations to break up Hood's army and render it useless for future operations. Do not stop for trains or supplies, but take them from the country, as the enemy has done. Much is now expected. The general had scarc
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 121.-skirmish near Mayfield, Kentucky. (search)
tent, dodging his head about, searching for something: I'm not going to shoot until I see something to shoot at! There! I see something! And he aimed his musket, fired, and a guerrilla dropped to the ground, shot through the heart. But, notwithstanding the gallant conduct of our boys, they were overpowered by numbers, and fourteen captured, including Sergeant Rowe and Hood killed. The prisoners were as follows: privates Larkins and Conroy, of company A, and Shepherd, Scott, Scoville, Van Duzer, and Davidson, of company B, Fifty-eighth Illinois. Two of the Fifty-eighth escaped in gallant style. The officer commanding the guerrillas rode up to our men as they were standing where they had surrendered, ordered them to stack their arms, and concluding with the satisfactory threat that he was going to hang at least two of them on the spot. Young Tiffin, the lad mentioned as firing after he saw something to fire at, thinking this was a hint for him, said he couldn't see it, droppe
I, 146, 150-154, 391-393. Tyler, Warren, II, 387. Tyndale, Hector, 1, 468. Underwood, Adeline B., I, 469. United States Military Academy, I, 42, 45, 55, 59, 70, 88, 89, 98. Bible Class, I, 52. Cadet at the, I, 44-58. Graduation, I, 59-73. Instructor, I, 90, 111. Superintendent of the, II, 485-490. Upham, Elizabeth K., II, 556. Upham, Francis W., II, 556. Upham, Thomas C., I,.31, 33. Upton, Emery, I, 92. Vandever, William, II, 58. Van Dorn, Earl, 1, 103. Van Duzer, John C., I, 525, 580. Vefik, Achmet, II, 511, 512. Vicars, Hedley, 1, 81. Victoria, Queen, II, 543. Villard, Henry, I, 452. Vincent, Thomas M., 11, 449. Wadhams, William, II, 468, 470, 472. Wadsworth, James S., I, 172, 203, 256, 352, 407, 408, 412, 415, 417, 418, 445. Wagner, George D., I, 500, 583, 584. Waite, Alexander B., I, 39, 40. Waite, Mrs. A. B., I, 66. Waite, Elizabeth Ann, I, 35, 36, 40, 41, 66. Wakefield, Mr., II, 469. Walcutt, C. C., II, 71,
attack at once, agreeably to your orders, though I believe it will be hazardous, with the small force of cavalry now at my service. That night news came from Van Duzer, the operator at Nashville: Scouts report large force twenty miles down river, towards Harpeth shoals, and say rebels propose to cross Cumberland river there, so A terrible storm of freezing rain has come on since daylight, which will render an attack impossible, till it breaks. Meanwhile, at eight P. M. of the 8th, Van Duzer, the telegraph operator at Nashville, The operators at the different Headquarters were in the habit of sending telegrams to each other, which sometimes conveyas he stepped from the steamer at Washington, and he telegraphed at once to Thomas: 11.30 P. M.: I was just on my way to Nashville, but receiving a despatch from Van Duzer, detailing your splendid success of to-day, I shall go no further. Push the enemy now, and give him no rest till he is entirely destroyed. Your army will cheer
attack at once, agreeably to your orders, though I believe it will be hazardous, with the small force of cavalry now at my service. That night news came from Van Duzer, the operator at Nashville: Scouts report large force twenty miles down river, towards Harpeth shoals, and say rebels propose to cross Cumberland river there, so A terrible storm of freezing rain has come on since daylight, which will render an attack impossible, till it breaks. Meanwhile, at eight P. M. of the 8th, Van Duzer, the telegraph operator at Nashville, The operators at the different Headquarters were in the habit of sending telegrams to each other, which sometimes conveyas he stepped from the steamer at Washington, and he telegraphed at once to Thomas: 11.30 P. M.: I was just on my way to Nashville, but receiving a despatch from Van Duzer, detailing your splendid success of to-day, I shall go no further. Push the enemy now, and give him no rest till he is entirely destroyed. Your army will cheer