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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 20 6 Browse Search
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Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 1: organization of the regiment. (search)
F. Devereux—Lieutenant Colonel. Henry J. Howe—Major John C. Chadwick—Adjutant. Levi Shaw—Quarter Master. J. Franklin Dyer—Surgeon Josiah N. Willard—Assistant Surgeon. Joseph C. Cromack—Chaplain. Upon the muster out of the Eighth Edward W. Hinks, of Lynn; Lieutenant Colonel, Arthur F. Devereux, of Salem; Major, Henry J. Howe, of Haverhill; Surgeon, J. Franklin Dyer, of Gloucester; Assistant Surgeon, Josiah N. Willard, of Boston; Chaplain, Joseph Levi Shaw, of Rockport. non. The regiment was very fortunate in having one of the most skillful physicians in the Army for its surgeon, Dr. J. Franklin Dyer. He was a man of gentle temperament, but thorough in every detail of his position and became as highly appreciateing zeal and this fact alone explains the healthy condition of the Nineteenth, often under very trying circumstances. Surgeon Dyer will be remembered both for his personality and for those qualities which, when found in a man of his ability,
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 3: in camp at Meridian Hill. (search)
In a short time such a high state of discipline was obtained that soldiers from other states would surround the guard lines at drill and watch the manoeuvres. They dubbed the regiment The Nineteenth Regulars because of its magnificent drill. It was especially proficient in the manual of arms, using Lieut. Col. Devereux's manual, in which all took great pride. It differed from that of other regiments in many ways and was very attractive and interesting. Said an officer of the regiment (Dr. Dyer) in writing home, September 29, 1861,— Through the untiring exertions of Colonel Hinks, who is emphatically a working man, the general condition of the regiment has vastly improved: cleanliness and order are strictly enforced. Under the superintendence of Lieut. Col. Devereux, the companies have acquired a proficiency in drill not surpassed by many older troops. Under charge of Major Howe, the important duties of the guard are well attended to. Other departments are in good hands, and a s
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 7: the winter at Muddy Branch. (search)
Chapter 7: the winter at Muddy Branch. The evenings at headquarters were often interesting. There was plenty of time to study, discuss and exemplify the tactics and regulations. Acting Adjutant Reynolds had a wooden regiment, made and sent to him by his father, and these were frequently brought into use to demonstrate a movement in the tactics. This series of blocks is still preserved among his army collection. Major Howe, or Jack Howe, as he was called, and Dr. J. Franklin Dyer, the regimental surgeon, were always good naturedly discussing the seniority of their respective positions, one being a major of the line, the other a major of the general (or medical) staff. This matter was brought up by one or the other of them nearly every evening, each making his claim and supporting it in strong but good humored argument. When sitting around the open fire and the conversation flagged, the major or the doctor would take a fresh cigar and between the whiffs, coincident to the l
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 15: the rest at Harrison's Landing. (search)
lness and bravery in the affair before Fair Oaks on June 25th and in the separate encounters in the retreat from the entrenchments at Fair Oaks to this point, to be Second Lieutenant. Sergt. Frederick Crofts, for his gallant conduct when wounded, rendering able assistance in rallying his own and another company in the fight at Nelson's Farm, to be Second Lieutenant. The regiment now numbers 527 ready for duty, but all are more or less exhausted. Too much praise cannot be accorded Surgeon Dyer who has had all the labor of his department thrown upon himself by the sickness of Surgeon Willard, and, in addition to his usual duties, has had the labor of managing the Medical department of the Brigade as Senior Surgeon. A. F. Devereux, Lieut. Col. Commanding Regt. On July 15, 1862, Colonel Hinks, then in Boston suffering from his wounds, wrote to Governor Andrew, recommending the following promotions for bravery and gallantry in the various engagements from June 25 to July 1.
t Lieut. William R. Driver, acting Adjutant, promoted from Lieutenant to date November 21, vice Boyd, promoted. Co. I.Capt. Johnathan F. Plympton in command of regiment. First Lieut. Samuel S. Prime, sick in Massachusetts. Second Lieut. John G. B. Adams, in command of company. Co. K.Capt. H. G. O. Weymouth, in General Hospital, severely wounded December 13. First Lieut. Lysander J. Hume, absent, wounded December 13. Second Lieut. Charles H. Wellock, in command of company. Surgeon J. Franklin Dyer, surgeon in chief, Second Division, Second Corps, on special duty. Assistant Surgeon Josiah H. Willard, absent sick. Assistant Surgeon V. R. Stone, present. Chaplain Ezra D. Winslow, discharged for disability by S. O. 395, W. D., A. G. O. Dec. 15 to date Dec. 12. (This office was not again filled.) First Lieut. Edgar M. Newcomb, died Dec.20, 1862, at Falmouth, Va., from wounds received at Fredericksburg, Dec. 13, promoted from Second Lieutenant to First Lieutenant, to date Nov.
setts for duty during the absence of the regiment. At the depot the usual delay incident to army railroading occurred, but finally the train was ready and the regiment started. Box cars were furnished for the men and they let themselves out,—dancing, singing and shouting until they were hoarse. The officers who returned with the regiment to Boston were: Colonel Devereux. Lieut. Col. Wass. Major Edmund Rice. Acting Adjt. William M. Curtis. Quartermaster Thos. F. Winthrop. Surgeon J. F. Dyer. Asst. Surgeon C. P. Pratt. Capt. Moncena Dunn. Capt. Wm. L. Palmer. Capt. D. C. Mumford. Capt. L. J. Hume. Feb. 4, 1864. Started for home at 2.30 o'clock. Arrived at Alexandria, Va., at 9 o'clock. Had supper and turned in in one of the old tobacco houses. Feb. 5, 1864. Left for Washington this forenoon and took the cars for Baltimore, arriving at night. Got supper and turned in. Feb. 6, 1864. Started for Philadelphia this morning, arriving a little before dark, got
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Chapter 39: capture of the regiment. (search)
pon the capture of the 19th Mass. Vols. by the enemy near Petersburg, Va., 22nd, June, 1864, the regimental and company records necessary to the complete and proper filling up of this blank were captured in the possession of the Adjutant and the several company commanders. William F. Rice, First Lieut., 19th Mass. Vols. Commanding. This return also records the following: Col. Ansel D. Wass, absent sick, June 28, 1864. Lt. Col. Edmund Rice, prisoner of war, May 12, 1864. Surgeon J. F. Dyer, on detached service, serving as surgeon in chief 2nd Division. Asst. Surgeon Gustavus P. Pratt. Adjutant William M. Curtis, prisoner of war, June 22nd. Regimental quartermaster, Thomas F. Winthrop. Co. A.Captain Isaac H. Boyd, on detached service. First Lieut. Wm. F. Rice, commanding regiment. Co. B.First Lieut. Henry A. Hale, on detached service, 2nd Brig. 2nd Corps, March 15, 1863. First Lieut. Wm. E. Barrows, in charge 2nd Div. ambulance train. Co. C.Capt. Elisha A.
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Roster of the Nineteenth regiment Massachusetts Volunteers (search)
of Sec. war. Duran, David, priv., (K), Aug. 13, ‘61; 21; deserted June, ‘62. Durand, Henry, priv., (C), July 16, ‘63; 32; sub. Marshall Johnson; deserted Sept. 14, ‘63 Dustin, James E., priv., (H), Nov. 26, ‘61; 29; ditch. disa. Sept. 23, ‘62. Dyer, Geo. M., priv., (G), Aug. 23, ‘61; 19; disch. disa. Dec. 7, ‘61. Dyer, Franklin J., surgeon, (F & G), Aug. 3, 1861; 35; disch. Aug. 28, 1864. Eacott, Henry, priv., (G), Aug. 23, ‘61; 22; killed in action, June 30, ‘62, White Oak Swamp Va. EagDyer, Franklin J., surgeon, (F & G), Aug. 3, 1861; 35; disch. Aug. 28, 1864. Eacott, Henry, priv., (G), Aug. 23, ‘61; 22; killed in action, June 30, ‘62, White Oak Swamp Va. Eagan, John, priv., (G), Aug. 23, ‘61; 18; wounded June 30, ‘62; Dec. 13, ‘62; re-en. Dec. 21, 63; M. O. June 30, ‘65; Co. A. Eastley, Alfred, priv., (—), Nov. 29, ‘62; 27; N. F.R. Eastman, Chas. F., priv., (H), Nov. 1, ‘61; 19; disch. July 20, ‘62. Eastman, Robert H., priv., (C), Aug. 1, ‘63; 18; sub.; transf. to 20 M. V. Jan. 14, ‘64. Eaton, James J., priv., (—), Jan. 28, ‘62; 24; see Co. F, 17 Mass.; not in 19th Regt. Eayrs, Winslow P., priv., (C),
p, ....................... .............................. 145, 286 Dunn, Moncena, 4, 7, 51, 64, 181, 182, 187, 192, 200, 210, 257, 261, 294, 295, 299, 300, 318, 324, 327, 332, 334, 356, 359 Dunham, Hallowell R.,........................................... 144, 153 Dunker Church, Md.,......................... ...............133, 134,135 Dumfries, Va.,....................................................... 213 Duran, David (K),................................................... 58 Dyer, J. Franklin, ........................ 1, 4, 8, 16, 49, 112, 193, 295, 333 Eacott, Henry, ...................................................... 105 Eagan, John (G),................................... ..... 107, 188 Eastman, Robert H., ................................................. 291 Eayers, Winslow P.,................................................ 291 Eckelman, James,................. ............ 291 Edward's Ferry, ............................. 16, 17, 18, 21, 30, 31, 213, 216 Ed