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Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 25 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 23 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 22 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 17 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 16 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 9: Poetry and Eloquence. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for James B. Eads or search for James B. Eads in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 3 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 6: naval expedition against Port Royal and capture of that place. (search)
aval expedition against Port Royal and capture of that place. Commander Rodgers. River steamers fitted and armed as gun-boats. commencement of the Mississippi squadron. Captain A. H. Foote ordered to command the Western flotilla. James B. Eads. Commodore Stringham relieved. commands given to flag officers Dupont and McKean. the Port Royal expedition fitted out. assembling of the ships of war and transports at Hampton Roads. frail ships. the expedition reaches Port Royal harboelled to the proportions of a fleet, all his talents and energies being devoted to the task of making it a formidable force such as the necessities of the case demanded. In this work Captain Foote was assisted by that distinguished engineer, James B. Eads, who planned and built that class of iron-clads known on the Mississippi as turtle backs, which gave such a good account of themselves during the war,and fought their way through many a bloody encounter, from Fort Henry to Grand Gulf, Port Hu
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 13: building a navy on the Western rivers.--battle of Belmont. (search)
the Western rivers.--battle of Belmont. James B. Eads engaged to build gun-boats. depot established a was fortunate in possessing, in the person of Mr. James B. Eads, the very man for the occasion. Mr. Eads undeMr. Eads undertook to build seven large gun-boats, heavily plated on the bow and lighter on the sides. which were calculattrod the deck of a vessel-of-war. Foote, Rodgers, Eads and their assistants put forth all their energies toising the work of construction; but with their aid Mr. Eads soon completed an efficient flotilla, which obtain 1861, Quartermaster General Meigs contracted with Mr. Eads to build a number of iron-clad gun-boats for the Wfficers. Within two weeks after the contract with Eads was signed, four thousand men were busily engaged ining boat, purchased by General Fremont and sent to Mr. Eads, whose ideas developing as he went on building, he Such a performance needs no eulogy, and even had Mr. Eads done no more in the cause of the Union, he would h
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 32: Navy Department.--energies displayed.--building of iron-clads (search)
ch was on the lathe when Sumter fired the first gun. If the Southerners did not make their plans before the war actually broke out, they deserve unbounded credit for the energy displayed in getting into existence such formidable vessels as they did before the North had done anything but build the little Monitor, which was ready nearly on the same day that the Merrimac created such consternation at Hampton Roads. It is true, that through the enterprise and energy of a western man, Mr. James B. Eads, we got some iron-clads afloat on the Mississippi, but it was not until the 17th of June, 1861, that the Quartermaster-general of the Army issued proposals for building the vessels. Great progress was made upon these quasi iron-clads when the work was once under full headway; but with all the remarkable services they performed, what were they when compared with the Virginia, the Louisiana, the Albemarle, Atlanta, Mobile, and three large vessels built or building at Yazoo City — the Mi