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plunging his wool in the bowels of his native land. This and no doubt the writers knew at . Gen Early was born in the county of Franklin, in this State, and has lived in all his life. He has notne of his forefathers ever lived anywhere else since the first of them came from England. Gen. Early is a graduate of West Point and served with through the Florida war. At the conclusion of tha integrity, traits that certainly do not indicate a Pennsylvania origin. The Yankee abve Gen. Early because he consideration on some of the towns of Pennsylvania. The scoundrel! They choose n horses, they have stolen, what a warfare of plunder they have wages. All we regret is, that Gen. Early did not deal more with them. They have taken a characteristic revenge. No so deep as that eal more with them. They have taken a characteristic revenge. No so deep as that of being called a Yankee, and of all others, a Pennsylvania Yankees. We have no doubt Gen. Early felt it deeply.
Gen. Edward Johnson. The Yankees have found out a new method of punishing their enemies. It is that of calling them Yankees. They called Gen. Early so, and they also call Gen. Edward Johnson so. Their papers say that General Johnson was killed in the hands of Gettysburg, and that he was a Pennsylvanian by birth. They mean, of course, Gen. Edward Johnson, for there is no other General, we believe, of either name, is General Lee's army. We have not heard from any other source that Gen. Johnson was killed, nor do we believe the statement to be true. He was, however, Pennsylvanian, but a native of Chesterfield county in this State. He graduated at West Point, and served through the Florida war. He afterwards went to Mexico, and was in all of Scott's battles. At the commencement of the war he was appointed Colonel of a extra regiment, and distinguished himself, on the battle of Greenbrier. Left in command of the post on the Greenbrier, he the decisive victory of Allegh
mong Virginia regiments and batteries. Col Jas. Gregory Hodges and Maj. Robert Poors, of the 14th Virginia, killed and Lieut. Col. White wounded, Capt. Coghill wounded and missing; Col. Magruder, of the 57th Virginia, wounded; Col. Aylett, of the 53d Virginia, killed, Col. Edmands, of the 38th Virginia, killed, Col. Colquit, --Virginia, killed; Col. James Marshall, of Fauquier county, Va. (commanding a North Carolina regiment) killed, Cols Terry and Mays wounded Capt. Samuel H. Early, of Gen Early's staff, wounded. In the 19th Virginia the following losses occurred: Col. Gant, wounded in neck and arm; Lieutenant Colonel Ellis, killed; Major Charles Peyton, slightly wounded; Adjutant Jas. McIntyre, seriously wounded. Co A Capt. J. C. Callin wounded. Co B: Lt. Palma Hanner wounded, Lt. Wood missing. Co C: Capt. Irving wounded and missing. Co D: Capt. Dick Harlan wounded; privates Fortune, Drumheller, Strange, and Johnson, killed, Woody missing Co E: Capt. Wm. Gross killed; Lieut
r outposts. Cannonading was heard all along the line during the day, but no general engagement had taken place. Gen. Lee was at Hagerstown last evening. Gens. Early and Ewell were holding the place with a large force, and are fortifying the eminences around the town. The rebel line extends from a point east of Hagerstown tn women are very bitter, and do not hesitate to enter their earnest protests against the outrages committed, and to express their contempt for the robbers. Gen. Early threatened to shoot several ladies for the warmth with which they ventured to express their opinions. The women of Secession proclivities are as bitter on the ch were captured by the Federal. The idea that Lee wanted money to carry on the war in Pennsylvania is particularly good after the little experiments of Ewell and Early in levying on the towns: On the 1st instant Capt. Cline, of the 31 Indiana cavalry went to Greencastle and captured Lee's private orderly and his entire esco
attle may take place at any time. There has been considerable skirmishing and manœuvering all day. --Twenty four hours will decide whether Grant will deliver battle here, or seek to turn our position again. Lieut Gen Hill is sick, and Maj Gen Early has been assigned to the command of his corps, and Brig Gen Gordon takes. Early's division. Brig Gen Mahone commands Anderson's division since the assignment of the latter to the command of Longstreet's corps. Col DuBose, of the Fifteenth Geirmishing and manœuvering all day. --Twenty four hours will decide whether Grant will deliver battle here, or seek to turn our position again. Lieut Gen Hill is sick, and Maj Gen Early has been assigned to the command of his corps, and Brig Gen Gordon takes. Early's division. Brig Gen Mahone commands Anderson's division since the assignment of the latter to the command of Longstreet's corps. Col DuBose, of the Fifteenth Georgia, succeeds to the command of Benning's brigade. Sallust.
however, he had succeeded the enemy had closed thickly around him and he was a prisoner in their hands, as was also Brig Gen G H Stuart of the Maryland line, with some twenty five hundred officers and men from this division, and some twenty pieces of artillery; twelve of which were from Page's and the rest from Cutshaw's battalions. This temporary success greatly elated the Yankees, and they pressed on with increasing numbers and a zeal intensified by their temporary success. Gordon, with Early's division, however, quickly come to the assistance of the remnant of Johnson's division, now under command of Col Williams, of La, and fought the enemy for some time, but were gradually pressed back to our second line of works, when Rodes came to the assistance of Johnson and Karly, whilst further on to the right Lane's brigade, of Hill's corps, was also forced back some distance until Gen L was enabled to reform his line, when portions of all of Hill's divisions became warmly engaged
ken division did not stop here; they continued their retreat far to the rear. Fortunately the gallant Gordon, commanding Early's division, was in reserve and swept to the rescue in a manner that excited the admiration of every beholder, including Ger parts of the field, and prevent this concentration of force, and for that purpose he engaged Anderson on our left, and Early, who had been sent to the extreme right. He made three separate assaults against the former, but was repulsed each time with frightful loss by Fields's division, formerly Hood's. Early, at the head of Hill's corps, buried him back, as a mad bull would an incautious mastiff caught upon his horns, as often as he advanced upon him. But it was against Ewell, who helt the enemy's flank, however, was executed by Mahone's and Lane's brigades on the extreme right, under the direction of Gen Early. The was intended to operate, not against the flank of the assaulting column, but against the flank of the Federal ar
against his right, under Gen. Kershaw. They were met with great steadiness, and repulsed in every instance. The attack extended to our extreme left, under Gen Early, with like results. Later in the day it was twice renewed against Gen Heth, who occupied Early's left, but was repulsed with loss. Gen. Hampton encounteredEarly's left, but was repulsed with loss. Gen. Hampton encountered the enemy's cavalry near Hawes's shop, and a part of Gen Wm. H. F. Lee's division drove them from their entrenchments. Our loss to-day has been small, and our success, under the blessing of God, all that we could expect. Respectfully, R. E. Lee, General. In the above dispatch Gen. Lee makes invariable mention ocontending hosts, and the situation is essentially the same that it was at the close of those repeated and desperate charges. On Friday evening the enemy attacked Early's front, and also Field's, of Longstreet's corps, but were easily repulsed. About eight o'clock on Friday night, as Hoke, Breckinridge and Mahene were moving
on in Georgia. The position of affairs near Atlanta remains unchanged. Skirmishing has been progressing daily, and it was in one of these a few days since that we lost Brig. Gen. Stevens, of Walker's division. Gen. Cheatham has taken command of Gen. Hood's corps. The recent cavalry raid was undertaken for the purpose of destroying the railroad between Atlanta and West Point, and which runs from West Point to Augusta. They struck it on Friday last at Conyer's depot, about 31 miles from Atlanta, and again at Covington, the station below. The whole force numbered about three brigades. The fact that they have been driven from the road by our cavalry has already been announced. Early's late victory. It is stated that Gen. Early's loss at Kernstown will not exceed fifty, the enemy having been panic-stricken and having done but little fighting. Our infantry pursued them five miles beyond Winchester, and our cavalry followed on seven miles further — to Bunker Hill.
From Gen Early, &c. Petersburg, July 28. --A telegram from Gen Early states that the Yankees have retreated across the Potomac at Williamsport, burning over 70 wagons and shandoning 12 caissons. Our forces held Martinsburg. --The Yankees retreated in great disorder. From the north side of James river there is nothing beyond the fact that the enemy's cavalry are on the Charles City road Everything is stagnant in front. The enemy came upon one of our brigades yesterday rather ardeGen Early states that the Yankees have retreated across the Potomac at Williamsport, burning over 70 wagons and shandoning 12 caissons. Our forces held Martinsburg. --The Yankees retreated in great disorder. From the north side of James river there is nothing beyond the fact that the enemy's cavalry are on the Charles City road Everything is stagnant in front. The enemy came upon one of our brigades yesterday rather ardently, on the north side of James river, causing them to give back hastily. In so doing four pieces of our artillery fell into the enemy's hands.