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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 261 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 218 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 206 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 206 2 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 199 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 165 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 149 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 121 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 113 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 102 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. A. Early or search for J. A. Early in all documents.

Your search returned 61 results in 10 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Trees whittled down at Horseshoe. (search)
r the latter's assignment to command in Richmond, he was with Lieut. Gen. Early until August, when General Johnson, being exchanged, he atten0, 1864, should occur. Evans' More properly Gordon's Brigade of Early's Division. On that day, Early was in command of Hill's Corps, andEarly was in command of Hill's Corps, and Gordon was in command of Early's Division, and Col. Evans in command of Gordon's Brigade. But both Gordon and Evans were promoted from thatEarly's Division, and Col. Evans in command of Gordon's Brigade. But both Gordon and Evans were promoted from that day. brigade was in Gordon's division, and as I started for the brigade, General Gordon himself appeared, and when I told him my mission, heith him until he was relieved from the command of the corps and General Early was placed in command. On the morning of the 13th or 14th ofgades did not suffer as much as General Steuart's—(Hays' brigade of Early's, and Stafford's brigade of Johnson's division were consolidated u that on the night of May 5th, the commander of Pegram's brigade of Early's division, which had been sent to extend our left, sent word to Ge
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.15 (search)
ion, except in Pegram's brigade, was small, says General Early in his report, which is found in Vol. 51, Part 1down on the road, and parallel to it. Orders came to Early's old brigade (the fourth Virginia), composed of thead of the column, I heard General Ramseur say to General Early: General, let me take that gun out of the wet. General Early vigorously advised and protested against it. Ramseur insisting, General Early finally acquiesced General Early finally acquiesced in the move. Advance of Pegram's brigade. The brigade was fronted to the left and the advance started. Tng on my cot afterwards I could hear the boom of General Early's guns around the walls of the city, after havinAugust. The old brigade, whose regiment furnished Early, William Smith, A. P. Hill, J. P. Walker and J. B. Ty age. A brigade that had been led to victory by General Early on a hundred battle-fields; that had swept every furnished to the Confederacy four or five generals: Early, William Smith, A. P. Hill, J. A. Walker and J. B. T
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
o shots; that of Fifteenth Virginia ten, and the pike was once cut in two; two color-bearers were wounded, and one of the color guard was killed and one wounded. The colors of the Thirty-second Virginia received seventeen shots, and the pike was once cut in two, and one of the color guard wounded. McLaws' division came to the aid of Jackson on the Confederate left at a critical time. Every one of Jackson's brigades had been forced back by the heavy assaults, saving only the brigade of Early, which was the extreme left of Lee's infantry. Early, with a remnant of Ewell's old division, under the indomitable Colonel Grigsby, of the Twenty-seventh Virginia Infantry, Stonewall Brigade, and with McLaws' division (after himself checking the enemy), made the counterstroke that turned the fortunes of the day. The statistics tell the terrible struggle, but it takes a soldier who was there to give vivacity to the same. Knowing Mr. C. A. Richardson, of the Life Guard, of Richmond, which w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg-Pickett's charge. (search)
enemy about three miles of the town. The enemy offered very determined resistance, but Heth's division, with great gallantry, drove him before it until it reached Seminary Heights, which overlooked Gettysburg. At this time, 2 p. m., Rodes' and Early's divisions of Ewell's corps — the first from Carlisle and the other from York, made their opportune appearance on the left of Heth and at right angles to it; then Pender's division was thrown forward, and all advancing together drove the enemy fttle was on. That afternoon after the fight was over, Anderson's division of Hill's corps arrived on the battle field and took position where Pender formerly was. At sunset Johnson's division of Ewell's corps came up and took line of battle on Early's left, and about midnight McLaws' division and Hood's division (except Laws' brigade) of Longstreet's corps encamped withing four miles of Gettysburg. The troops which had been engaged in the fight bivouacked on the positions won. I am thus par
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Lee at Gettysburg. (search)
sburg comes in your way, capture it; while General Early with his division from Ewell's corps turnest to McConnellsburg, at its own pleasure, and Early on the Susquehannah to the east with Ewell scodistance north, coming east from Carlisle, and Early was retiring from York toward Cashtown; Stuart But just then, General William Smith, one of Early's brigadiers, guarding the left flank on the Yt a Federal force was moving on his front, and Early sent General Gordon and his brigade to supportthe time could not be balanced with gold. General Early and General Rodes came with great earnestns he supposed the commanding position of which Early and Rodes spoke, that some of those people werd reform on Cemetery hill. It was no fault of Early and Rodes and their divisions, that the Cemetee came over and conferred with Generals Ewell, Early and Rodes, outside of the town, on the Carlisl not directly of the operations in Virginia. (Early.) Was he indeed a great commander? In 1861[1 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Twelfth Alabama Infantry, Confederate States Army. (search)
The Twelfth again marched into Maryland when Early threatened Washington. It participated at WinI was sent with a squad of men to report to Major Early, a tall, dark-skinned, civil engineer, said to be a brother of General J. A. Early, and to assist in the construction of a pontoon bridge acro. Bacon of Macon, Ga. There is a report that Gen. Early levied a contribution on Frederick City, cales, under a large tree near where they fell, Gen. Early and staff rode by, and the old hero spoke tolley (for the men are in the army), as well as Early's troops. Grant and he have resolved to make e citizens of Maryland and Pennsylvania by General Early and his command recently. Such warfare ishave many conflicting and unreliable rumors of Early's movements. Six families, in the vicinity ofy the office every day going to the front, and Early's army must be a mere handful of exhausted, ilmies reached Richmond, and soon thereafter General Early was detached and sent on his famous campai[11 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.33 (search)
ce, and shows, marked in red and black, the lines of the works occupied by the troops of both armies engaged in the several battles in this neighborhood. The positions of the armies on May 18th, 1864, were as follows: Confederate Army. Longstreet's First Corps (Anderson commanding), on the extreme Confederate right, composed of: Kershaw's Division, Field's Division, Pickett's Division (absent), with the artillery of this corps. Not in action as far as known. Hill's Third Corps (Early commanding), in centre on left of Anderson, composed of: Anderson's Division, Heth's Division, Wilcox's Division, with the artillery of this corps. Infantry not in action, but Third Corps guns replying to Warren's. Ewell's Second Corps, next on the extreme Confederate left, composed of: Early's (Gordon) Division, perhaps slightly; Johnson's Division, partly in action; Rodes' Division (possibly), slightly, with the artillery of this corps. Firing in a desultory manner from the work
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.34 (search)
Georgia, who afterwards became the successor of Jackson, Ewell and Early as commander of the Second Corps. He was in Jackson's and in Earh and 6th of May. On the 8th of May, A. P. Hill being sick, Major-General Early was put in command of his corps. General Stafford, of Louork. R. D. Johnson's North Carolina brigade had been assigned to Early's division, and on May 6th and on the 12th of May the two divisions of Early and Johnson were composed as follows: (1) Early's old division, under Gordon, consisted of Pegram's Virginia brigade of five regEarly's old division, under Gordon, consisted of Pegram's Virginia brigade of five regiments, under Colonel J. S. Hoffman; Gordon's Georgia brigade of six regiments, under Colonel C. A. Evans, and the North Carolina brigade of id: Ride with me to General Gordon (General Gordon was in charge of Early's division in reserve, General Early being in command of A. P. HillGeneral Early being in command of A. P. Hills, the Third Corps). I rode with General Lee about two hundred yards or more to our left rear, as we faced the enemy, and quickly came upon P
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.35 (search)
was with Ewell's corps, which was the left wing of the Confederate army, and near Johnson's division. One section of my battery was ordered in on the right of the Orange and Fredericksburg pike, in an open space near where Colonel J. Thompson Brown was killed. The other section was placed on a cross road, which passed through Johnson's entrenchments on the left of the turnpike. At one time during the battle I saw an officer being carried off the field, and was told it was Major Daniel, of Early's division. Double quick and double canister on May 10, 1864, we marched from there to Spotsylvania. Arrived there, according to my recollection, the morning of the 10th of May. My battery belonged to Colonel Cutshaw, and was in the rear that day. The Colonel ordered me to remain where I was, as there was no room on the line for me, and stated that he would show me where my position was as soon as he could find a place for me. Late in the evening I was ordered up at double quick, to com
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.36 (search)
re it is invariably called King's Artillery; but this is a misnomer. It was McLaughlin's Battalion of King's Division, the other battalion of the division consisting of reserves and never appearing on the returns forwarded from the army in the field. The battalion commander was Major William McLaughlin, afterwards Judge McLaughlin; the division commander, Lieutenant-Colonel J. Floyd King. This battalion was attached to Breckinridge's command [Wharton's and Gordon's Divisions], under General Early during the Valley campaign of 1864. At the close of the campaign it went into winter quarters near Fisherville, in Augusta county, but soon afterwards was ordered to deposit its guns in Lynchburg and go with the horses to the Narrows of New River, in Giles county, to winter. The reason for this was that Bryan's battery [by what authority does not matter] kept a detail of several men at that place, cultivating rice bottom lands and raising some four or five thousand bushels of corn an