Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Jubal A. Early or search for Jubal A. Early in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
outh Garolina, Colonel W. D. Rutherford. Seventh South Carolina, Captain E. J. Goggans. Eighth South Carolina, Colonel J. W. Henagan. Fifteenth South Carolina, Colonel J. B. Davis. Twentieth South Carolina, Colonel S. M. Boykin. Third South Carolina Battalion, Lieutenant-[Colonel] W. G. Rice. Second army corps. see organization of the army of the Valley District August 20th and 31st, as shown by inspection reports. Notes(b) to (i) refer to that organization. Lieutenant-General Jubal A. Early Commanding. Gordon's division. Major-General John B. Gordon. Hays's brigade. constituting York's brigade. Fifth Louisiana, Colonel Henry Forno. Sixth Louisiana, Colonel William Monaghan. Seventh Louisiana, Colonel D. B. Penn. Eighth Louisiana, Colonel A. DeBlanc. Ninth Louisiana, Colonel William R. Peck. Gordon's brigade. Evans's brigade, Colonel E. N. Atkinson commanding, and containing Twelfth Georgie Battalion. Thirteenth Georgia, Lieutenant-C
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Flag Presentation to the Washington Artillery. (search)
rs, was so much like the United States standard that it was impossible, in the confusion of battle, to distinguish one from the other. So serious was this difficulty on the first field of Manassas that the timely appearance of the forces of General Early, with his brigade of Virginia, Louisiana, and Mississippi troops, on the extreme right flank of the enemy, thereby insuring their defeat on that historic day, had well-nigh caused ruin to the Confederates, because Early's troops were supposedEarly's troops were supposed to be a part of the enemy's forces, and it was with difficulty that they could be distinguished by their flag. After this graphic and brilliant introduction, which want of space has here required to be curtailed, the eloquent speaker continued as follows: General Beauregard had determined that no troops of his command would again be exposed to such a mistake, and he did all in his power to accomplish that end, General Johnston, as the Commander in-Chief of our united forces, greatly assi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Is the Eclectic history of the United States a proper book to use in our schools? (search)
several years a teacher in one of the best academies in Virginia. For some years after the war one of the accomplished professors whom General Lee called around him to make Washington College an institution of such high grade, and for several years the able and efficient head of McDonogh Institute, Colonel Allan stands in the very forefront of practical teachers, and his opinions about text-books are of highest value. Serving on the staff of General Stonewall Jackson, General Ewell, General Early, and General Gordon, Colonel Allan has added to his personal knowledge of the events of the war, a most careful study of official documents and reliable statements on both sides, and has won a wide reputation as a painstaking, accurate, and able military critic. His paper is, therefore, of highest authority, and we give it in full (as a brief and general statement of the character of this book) before going into our own more detailed citation of its errrors. The Eclectic history of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Is the, Eclectic history of the United States, written by Miss Thalheimer and published by Van Antwerp, Bragg & Co., Cincinnati, a fit book to be used in our schools? (search)
And in this connection we call especial attention to the general scope and bearing of the biographical sketches given in the book— eleven very tame sketches of Confederates, and twenty-six sketches of Federals, most of the latter glowing eulogies. It will not do to say that the sketches are chiefly of Generals commanding armies, for many of the Federals sketched would not come under this head, while a number of Confederates who commanded armies, such as John B. Floyd, Henry A. Wise. J. A. Early, John B. Hood, S. D. Lee, Leonidas Polk, Stirling Price, Earl Van Dorn, Kirby Smith, Dick Taylor, Hardee, &c., are omitted. The truth is the Confederates largely outnumbered the Federals in men worthy of places in general history, and for Southern schools it is unpardonable to omit such names as Ashby, Stuart, Forrest, Hampton, Ewell, A. P. Hill, Pat. Cleburne, M. F. Maury, Buchanan, and scores of others who should be household words among our people. The sketches of Lee and Jackson
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Sherman's march from Atlanta to the coast-address before the survivors' Association of Augusta, Ga., April 20th, 1884. (search)
s, as well as a countless number of their slaves. I estimate the damage done to the State of Georgia and its military resources at one hundred millions of dollars; at least twenty millions of which have inured to our advantage, and the remainder is simple waste and destruction. The total value, at this time, and upon a specie basis, of the taxable property in Georgia, including lands and slaves, did not exceed $650,000,000. Contrast this official confession with the address of Major-General Early to the citizens of York, when his invading columns were passing over Pennsylvania soil: I have abstained from burning the railroad buildings and car shops in your town because, after examination, I am satisfied that the safety of the town would be endangered. Acting in the spirit of humanity which has ever characterized my government and its military authorities, I do not desire to involve the innocent in the same punishment with the guilty. Had I applied the torch without regard to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Letters from General Lee to President Davis on the situation in September, 1863. (search)
tember 14, 1863. His Excellency Jefferson Davis, President Confederate States, Richmond: Mr. President. My letter of this morning will have informed you of the crossing of the Rappahannock by the cavalry of General Meade's army, and of the retirement of ours to the Rapidan. The enemy's cavalry so greatly outnumbers ours, and is generally accompanied by so large a force of infantry in its operations, that it must always force ours back. I advanced last night to the Rapidan, a portion of Early's and Anderson's divisions, and arrested the further progress of the enemy. I have just returned from an examination of the enemy's cavalry on the Rapidan. It seems to consist of their entire force, three divisions, with horse-artillery, and, as far as I can judge, is the advance of General Meade's army. All the cavalry have been withdrawn from the lower Rappahannock, except some reduced pickets from Richard's ford, to Fredericksburg. Our scouts report that their whole army is under marc
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of cavalry operations. (search)
ollected fell into the hands of the enemy. Wickham did not call for a report while with us in the Valley and I did not make one. Until these recent communications I had contented myself with the reflection that the credit for what was done and the reward of the deeds was in doing them. I shall endeavor to give my recollections with frankness, and will criticise our operations without hesitation, that the student in quest of facts may see the boldness and enterprise displayed by General J. A. Early, and the corresponding want of it evinced by his opponent, General Phil. Sheridan. The latter had the finest equipped army the world had ever seen, numbering about 65,000 men of all arms, of which 11,000 were well mounted cavalry, and 100 field guns. To combat this force, Early had about 14,000 men of all arms, less than 3,500 cavalry, and the usual complement of field guns. Sheridan said our cavalry were in poor condition. The country was admirably suited to the operations of lar
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Is the Eclectic history of the United States, written by Miss Thalheimer, and published by Van Antwerp, Bragg & Co., Cincinnatti, a fit book to be used in our schools? (search)
he author compresses into eleven lines at the bottom of page 291, is utterly unfair. General J. E. Johnston (see his Narrative, page 133) claims that he won a decided victory at Seven Pines, and that his being wounded at the close of the battle only prevented the full fruition of the results contemplated. As for General Lee's raising immense numbers of recruits between Seven Pines and Seven Days, the exact truth is that he received from all sources, including Jackson, (see papers of General Early and Colonel Charles Marshall, Southern Historical so-Ciety papers, volume I, pages 408-424) only 23,000 reinforcements—that McClellan was also reinforced—that General Lee numbered, when Seven Days opened, a little less than 80, 000 men (78,000), and McClellan, 105,000 in position, and 10,000 at Fortress Monroe, and he did as much to strengthen his defences as did Lee—and that instead of simply severing McClellan from his supplies, Lee attacked him in works as strong as engineering skill <
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 95 (search)
hanged a few shots and moved on and joined General Early at New Town. Our battery at the fort had e doom of Early's army was inevitable; indeed, Early's army should never have been allowed to go tor of the enemy upon their line of retreat; but Early was fully alive to this danger and had guardedter the cavalry action at Millford on the 22d, Early had sent in haste for a brigade of Wickham's fg to my recollection. The morning after General Early's retreat from Fisher's Hill, he sent for ft me in command and went in person to see General Early, across the mountain. In his route he metsame couriers that it would not be safe to General Early; that Early could not know what was in oure could hold this part of the enemy's cavalry, Early was safe. Torbert, running out his artilleryns had gone up the main Staunton pike with General Early's train, and we were getting very short ofand with them had some sharp skirmishing. General Early was now expecting reinforcements. Fight[13 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Retreat up the Luray Valley. (search)
ster up the Luray Valley pike, and the doom of Early's army was inevitable; indeed, Early's army shEarly's army should never have been allowed to go to Mill Creek the day of that battle. At Front Royal there arr of the enemy upon their line of retreat; but Early was fully alive to this danger and had guardedft me in command and went in person to see General Early, across the mountain. In his route he metat it would not be safe to General Early; that Early could not know what was in our front, and thate could hold this part of the enemy's cavalry, Early was safe. Torbert, running out his artillery the mountain. It was then too late to get to Early, as his infantry had passed New Market. We cons had gone up the main Staunton pike with General Early's train, and we were getting very short of up to near Port Republic, where we joined General Early. There we again met the enemy's cavalry, cavalry, and with them had some sharp skirmishing. General Early was now expecting reinforcements.[3 more...]
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