hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 82 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 82 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 164 results in 2 document sections:

time from Martinsburg. This was frustrated by Early being compelled to fall back, and your operatiat Culpeper, where he received a despatch from Early, calling for reinforcements. He at once set ooss the mountain in person to communicate with Early, and preparations were made for a combined atteinforcements from the James. The strength of Early and Anderson combined was at least equal to th, as well as the general one at the South; but Early himself entertained a very different one.—See his Memoir, passim. But if he did no more, Early was to secure the harvests of the Valley. Thias one great object of the campaign, and after Early's return from Maryland, his supplies were obtan's numbers in this campaign. On the 21st, Early and Anderson advanced, and on the 22nd, Sheride and a half miles wide. So secure indeed did Early now consider himself that his ammunition boxesainted on the fresh artillery ordered to the Valley: For General Sheridan, care of General Early. [31 more...]
olumn direct from Culpeper to the Potomac, and Early to advance at the same time from Martinsburg. at Culpeper, where he received a despatch from Early, calling for reinforcements. He at once set o Meanwhile, there were rumors that a part of Early's force had been sent west of the Alleghanies,r cross the Potomac. The next day he said: If Early has detached troops for Richmond, I will attac-chief said to Sheridan: If you want to attack Early, you might reinforce largely from Washington. andsome style, without cover; but by this time Early's two divisions from Martinsburg had come uponrling. It would, indeed, have been better for Early if Sheridan had been cashiered before the battercept the enemy at Newmarket, twenty miles in Early's rear. Before daylight on the 22nd, Crook thought it possible, though not probable, that Early might turn north, or send his cavalry north; aand wagons and caissons burned or abandoned by Early in his flight; but he captured many unhurt sol[31 more...]