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The Daily Dispatch: September 15, 1864., [Electronic resource] 11 1 Browse Search
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he minds of those croakers who were so dismally affected by the report. From the Valley. The latest advices from the Valley of Virginia represent that General Early, on Saturday last, the 10th instant, advanced from his position at Bunker Hill towards Martinsburg. This place is in Berkeley county, only seven miles south of the nearest point on the Potomac river. The army under Sheridan, confronting General Early, is probably nearly as large as that before Petersburg. A New York paper states that Grant detached thirty-eight or forty thousand men from the Army of the Potomac and sent them to the Valley, to which must be added the troops under Hunter, Crook, Kelly and Averill. This immense force, so far from being able to drive Early out of the Valley, has had enough to do in guarding the Potomac, in order to prevent our army from crossing that stream. Meanwhile, our troops have captured over two thousand prisoners and inflicted a succession of punishments upon the Yankees
From the Valley. --A letter from General Early's army, dated the 6th instant, says: We have been engaged during the past eight or ten days (Rodes's division) in fighting Averill's cavalry. He has about four thousand and some artillery, with which he drives in our cavalry every day or two, and compels us to go out and whip him back. This is not a very dangerous business, but it is very harassing to infantry, and by no means profitable, as we cannot catch them. On Wednesday, we drove him back to Martinsburg and returned to our camp at Bunker Hill the same evening, a distance of twenty-five miles. We found nothing in Martinsburg, as the Baltimore and Ohio railroad has not been rebuilt. This road and the canal have not been used since the 1st of July, and must be a serious annoyance, as this is the season when coal is carried to Baltimore and Washington. All of Sheridan's army has moved down to Berryville. Anderson had a sharp little affair with the Right corps near
General Early. --"Phax," who is lately from the Army of Virginia, contributes to the Rebel the following sketch of the distinguished commander who is opposing Sheridan in the Valley: Old Jubal Early, or as General Lee calls him, his "had old man," has won a name during his sojourn in the Valley of Virginia of which he is well worthy. Did you ever see him? If not, you have missed one of the greatest curiosities of the war.--He is a man of considerable corporality, with a full face, Old Jubal Early, or as General Lee calls him, his "had old man," has won a name during his sojourn in the Valley of Virginia of which he is well worthy. Did you ever see him? If not, you have missed one of the greatest curiosities of the war.--He is a man of considerable corporality, with a full face, which has the appearance of the full moon when it is at its height in redness. He is about six feet high, and of immense structure. His voice sounds like a cracked Chinese fiddle, and comes from his mouth somewhat on the style of a hard-shell Baptist, with a long drawl, accompanied with an interpolation of oaths. In the winter his head is encased in a net striped woolen skull cap, drawn down over his ears, while his body is contained within the embraces of a Virginia cloth overcoat, striking