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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 34 0 Browse Search
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nd a battery of guns, in command of Colonel Godwin, of the Fifty-fourth North-Carolina. They were part of Ewell's corps, Early's division. It was about three o'clock when the head of the column neared the station. A heavy line of skirmishers and why, as we had no artillery, the day being quite windy, and our camp being about six miles from the river. The whole of Early's division was marched rapidly to the river. Brigadier-General Hoke's brigade of three regiments, the Sixth, Fifty-fourtatteries.) This fire from the artillery and sharp-shooters was kept up until after sunset. The other two brigades of General Early's division, commanded by Brigadier-Generals Gordon and Pegram, were held in position on this side the river. By sunsned, but it does not shake our hopes as to success. This sad affair took place in the presence of General Lee and Major-General Early, who had arrived on this side the river. The loss of the enemy has been serious, as the ground in front of our
o this, it was necessary to advance his line of skirmishers. He was entirely successful in deluding the wily foe, for, in the language of the F. F. V.'s, he fought right smart along the front of the Second corps. Colonel Carroll's brigade, composed of Western troops, conducted themselves in a manner that cannot be too highly praised. Colonel Carroll evinced considerable skill by drawing the enemy to his line of battle down she turnpike, where large numbers of Gordon's brigade, belonging to Early's division, were captured Colonel Carroll had a miraculous escape from instant death, his clothing having ten or twelve bullet-holes in it. Colonel Lockwood, of the same brigade, had his uniform pierced in several places by Minie balls. In the afternoon, General Meade ascertained that General French had participated in an engagement, and the enemy had massed a force strong enough to successfully resist him. The exact position of the Third corps, at this time, still continued an uncertaint
here in China, perhaps about the great wall. The Yankees were retreating toward the Devil hole. Early bound for the same place! They did very little damage in the valley. Here is the moral: The marshals under Napoleon's eye were invincible — with separate commands, blunderers. A general of division, with General Robert E. Lee to plan and put him in the right place, does well. Mosby would plan and execute a fight or strategic movement better than Longstreet at Suffolk or Knoxville, Tubal Early at Staunton. Jackson's blunt response to some parlor or bar-room strategist in Richmond, More men, but fewer orders, was wisdom in an axiom — true then, just as true now as when the hero of the valley uttered it. It is difficult to direct, especially by couriers, the movement of troops a hundred miles distant, among mountains the ranking general never saw, except on an inaccurate map. It is not every commander who can point out roads he never heard of, and by-paths he never dreamed of, a
A, who is severely, but I rejoice to say not fatally, wounded in the head. Lieutenant Rivers, I regret to state, is severely wounded in the foot. Another account. Harper's Ferry, Va., January 11, 1864. Mr. Editor: Since the rebel General Early attempted to make that raid down the Shenandoah Valley, but which, you remember, he didn't make, for the simple reason that he couldn't make it — a small force of our cavalry, commanded by Major Cole, numbering in all not over eighty men, havtill covers the ground. Colonel Wells, formerly commander of the brigade stationed at this place, has been ordered to preside at a court-martial. Supply-trains run on the Winchester and Potomac Railroad as far as Haul Town. It is said that General Early, with a considerable force, is still at Winchester, and that he has gone into winter quarters there. H. E. T. List of killed and wounded. Medical Director's office, Harper's Ferry, Va., January 10, 1864. sir: I have the honor to r
ast we had been in possession of information to the effect that General Early was concentrating troops and being reenforced in the neighborhoder on that subject. Hardly had this been done when we got news of Early having moved on Friday, January twenty-ninth. Of course it was tooonel Mulligan's troops, and afterward moved with Mulligan to attack Early, near Moorfield. How Thoburn outwitted the enemy, who thought he htened to come into our lines. From these deserters we learned that Early had been reenforced heavily, and that it was true he had been makinment. At the time when Mulligan first engaged Rosser at the ford — Early was at Moorefield (behind Rosser) with a heavy force of infantry anas the South-Fork of the South-Branch. Rosser undertook to protect Early's rear. The narrowness of the valley alone prevented us from drivibeen successful, and that it is beyond doubt we have again defeated Early's designs, which were to seriously injure the line of the railroad
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 120.-operations in Western Virginia. (search)
Doc. 120.-operations in Western Virginia. Charlestown, Va., Jan. 8, 1864. At an early hour on the morning of the sixth instant, Colonel Boyd, commanding the cavalry brigade at Charlestown, started with his entire command and a section of artillery, for the purpose of reconnoitring the enemy's force and position. For some days past considerable excitement had prevailed relative to the intentions of Imboden and Early, and an attack upon Martinsburgh was considered imminent, until the timely arrival of General Averill restored confidence in our ability to resist and repel the enemy, in case such attack were made. In the mean time, however, Imboden had remained stationary in the vicinity of Winchester, and it was considered advisable to feel his actual strength and force him to fall back to his old quarters. He seemed to have anticipated this plan of ours, for when our cavalry reached Winchester, he made a retrograde movement in the direction of Strasburgh. Accordingly, our
ation to murder any person or persons — even so great an outlaw as Jeff Davis. Stripped of this interpolation, the memoranda and proclamation do not exceed the bounds of legitimate warfare. The planners and participators in this raid are as high-minded and honorable men as even the conceited editor of the Examiner could wish, and the leaders of the expedition would go as far in preventing their men committing overt acts. And even if the worst was true, how illy it becomes the indorsers of Early in Pennsylvania, Morgan in Ohio, Quantrel in Kansas, and Beauregard in his plot to murder President Lincoln and Lieutenant-General Scott, to take special exceptions to this raid! Either one of the confederate leaders named has been guilty of more doubtful acts than were ever contemplated by any body of Union raiders. Forgetting these things, they threaten to mete out condign punishment to the prisoners captured from Kilpatrick's command. The real animus, however, may be found--first, in t