Browsing named entities in William A. Crafts, Life of Ulysses S. Grant: His Boyhood, Campaigns, and Services, Military and Civil.. You can also browse the collection for Early or search for Early in all documents.

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effectively as to stagger, if not defeat, the enemy, while never, in all his conflicts, had he been driver from the field or forced to retreat. Moreover, under his direction, as commander of all the national armies, Sherman had won his victories in Georgia, made his grand march to the sea, and moved through the Carolinas with unvaried success, to join in a final and irresistible campaign against the exhausted Confederacy; Thomas had won his glorious victory at Nashville; Canby had captured Mobile; Terry had taken Fort Fisher and Wilmington; and Sheridan had vanquished Early in the Valley of the Shenandoah. In the campaigns under his immediate command, he had captured more than a hundred thousand prisoners, and hundreds of cannon, while his subordinates, in the campaigns under his general direction, had taken as many more. Wherever he commanded, wherever his orders were received, wherever his influence was felt, he had organized victory, and moved on steadily to the final triumph.
of distinguishing themselves. It was his discernment which selected each to take that command, and to perform those deeds, for which he was best adapted. His most brilliant subordinates, Sherman and Sheridan, were especially thus indebted to him. Sherman was looked upon as little better than a lunatic till Grant gave direction to his abilities, and Sheridan achieved no distinction till Grant, seeing his true capacity, made him his cavalry commander, and sent him to the Shenandoah to defeat Early, and to Five Forks to break through Lee's lines. Thomas, McPherson, and others, were in like manner indebted to Grant for promotion and opportunities; and each of them was trusted and assigned to difficult duties, because of his intuitive knowledge of their ability and fitness for the work demanded of them. So, also, his staff has always been composed of men admirably qualified for their respective duties, and who performed them with the same quiet energy which characterized their chief.