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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 261 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 218 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 206 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 206 2 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 199 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 165 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 149 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 121 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 113 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 102 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. A. Early or search for J. A. Early in all documents.

Your search returned 28 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gregg's brigade of South Carolinians in the Second. Battle of Manassas. (search)
il the ammunition of his brigade being exhausted, and all its field officers but two killed or wounded, it was relieved, after several hours of severe fighting, by Early's brigade and the Eighth Louisiana regiment. Is it not strange then that in the face of these official reports it should be questioned whether or not there rea there were our friends coming to our assistance, and not the enemy to our attack. Field, with his Virginians, and Pender, with his North Carolinians, relieved by Early and Forno, of Ewell's division, came rushing up, comparatively fresh for the work, and cheering us as they advanced on either side of our little band, waited not tdred. History Gregg's Brigade, page 37. Still greater was the disparity in the regiments of Jackson's and Ewell's division which had been in the Valley campaign. Early's regiments in the Manassas campaign averaged but two hundred and fifty; others had not more than one hundred and fifty; Southern Historical Papers, volume VIII,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 8 (search)
from General Lee's army with his brigade. General Early, in his narrative, page 98, says, Rosser wtion at Milford. This was the extent of General Early's information about the greatest disaster called for by Rosser from my command, and General Early's report clearly shows that Rosser did notuts the blame of his want of judgment upon General Early (who happened, as shown, to be twenty-fiveolonel of Munford's brigade. I have given General Early's entire report on this fight, which showsh the other forces by moving down to Milford. Early's infantry arrived at New Market, and Sheridant his 50,000 men, some not very reliable, that Early tried so hard to get at, when behind their works at Charlestown, and Early only had, say 14,000? Fitz. Lee's contingent had strengthened it, but on the north side of the Shenandoah river. General Early being notified, moved out in line of battlem the information they were seeking, viz: Was Early still there? When they moved back I followed,[7 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official reports of the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
, Rodes's brigade, Darksville, Va., July 17th, 1863. Lieutenant Samuel H. Moore, A. A. A. General, Rodes's Brigade: Lieutenant,—I have the honor to make the following report of the action of the Corps of Sharpshooters, under my command, during the battles of the 1st, 2d and 3d July. The corps was deployed two miles from Gettysburg with the left resting upon the Heidlersburg Pike. After receiving instructions from General Rodes to keep connected with those on my right, and feel for General Early's advance on the left, I moved steadily forward upon the town, driving in the cavalry videttes, posted in the road, and on commanding hills. About half a mile from the suburbs a large force of cavalry was observed in line, with a heavy line of men dismounted as skirmishers, the former charged us twice, but were easily repulsed. After an hour or more of active skirmishing, the enemy's infantry advanced in force through the town, and under cover of a cloud of skirmishers, moved upon ou
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division Army of Northern Virginia Association. (search)
ns were made out of two, so that at Sharpsburg, he had ten divisions without having more brigades and regiments. We have reports from five of these divisions: Early's division, 4 brigades, 3,500 men; D. R. Jones's division, 6 brigades, 2,430 men; A. P. Hill's division, 6 brigades, 3,524 men; McLaws's division, 5 brigades, 2,83precious legacy to the land they loved so well. General Hill was vociferously applauded as he took his seat, and was warmly congratulated on his speech. General Early was loudly called for, but excused himself from responding, except to remind his friend, General Hill, that the Federal estimate of the Confederate strength ateartily thanked for the ability with which he had presided and the energy he had displayed in the management of the affairs of the Association. On motion of General Early, Misses Mary and Mildred Lee, Mrs. Thomas J. Jackson and her daughter, and Mrs. J. E. B. Stuart and her daughter were unanimously and enthusiastically elected
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Kilpatrick-Dahlgren raid against Richmond. (search)
pose of the object of the expedition. To use a trite expression—put the shoe on the other foot—let the North imagine General Early's body to be found in the vicinity of Washington, when his forces retired from there in July of the same year, with oa letter on the reverse side of the paper on which the disputed document was written. The following letter from General J. A. Early, in transmitting a photograph copy to our office, makes this matter so clear that we insert it, although not intended for publication: Letter from General J. A. Early. Lynchburg, February 24th, 1879. Rev. John William Jones, D. D., Secretary Southern Historical Society Dear sir,—I send you the copy of Dahlgren's address which Mr. McDaniel gave meof writing on that side, some words of which I can make out by holding the paper to the looking-glass. Yours truly, J. A. Early. Summing up of the proof. As to the authenticity of the papers, then, we have established, we think, the follow<