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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 261 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 218 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 206 2 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 206 2 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 199 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 165 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 149 5 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 121 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 113 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 102 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for J. A. Early or search for J. A. Early in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 6 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.32 (search)
cessary preparations for departure he called up one of his faithful old servants, and said: Billy, I shall be obliged to leave home before the Yankees come, I am sorry to go, but I shall leave everything in your charge with confidence that you will do the best you can. There are some valuables in the house which your mistress will give you to hide; do what you think is best with them, but be sure the Yankees do not find them. When Judge Davis returned, after Hunter had been hurled back by Early, he found everything safe, due to Uncle Billy's diplomacy with the Yankees. The Judge said: Billy, I think we may safely bring the silver back now. Well, said Uncle Billy, come with me, master, and we will measure for it. A short distance from the house Uncle Billy halted by a tree, to which he tied a line, and asked his master to hold the other end at a certain point; then fastening another line to a sapling he stretched it across the one held by the Judge. Right there, master, where
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of General Jackson (search)
onet, checked the onward tide of McDowell's victory, and held his position until Kirby Smith and Early came up on the flank. Jeb Stuart made a successful cavalry charge, Johnston and Beauregard had t won the day despite the gallant defense. I chanced to be near and heard the order he gave General Early at Cedar Run (Slaughter's Mountain) in the fight with our old friend, General Banks (Stonewad been skirmishing all of the morning, and Colonel Pendleton, of Jackson's staff, rode up to General Early and said quietly: General Jackson's compliments to General Early, and says that he must advaGeneral Early, and says that he must advance on the enemy, and he will be supported by General Winder. Grim old Early replied in his curtest tones: Give my compliments to General Jackson, and tell him I will do it. It was on this fielEarly replied in his curtest tones: Give my compliments to General Jackson, and tell him I will do it. It was on this field that several of Jackson's Brigades were broken, and it looked as if Banks was about to win, when Jackson dashed in among them, and rallied the confused ranks by exclaiming, Rally on your colors, an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fitzhugh Lee. From the Times-dispatch, January 5, 1908. (search)
sabres, and were a solace to many weary and homesick hearts. Ream's Station was one of General Fitz's best fights, when his division, with two of Mahone's Brigades, struck Wilson's two Divisions of Federal Cavalry, stripped them of their spoils and put them to ignominious route, capturing all their wagons, eighteen pieces of artillery, their ambulances and 800 negroes, who had been abducted from their homes. In the battle of Winchester, September 19, 1864, Sheridan's first success over Early in the Valley, Fitz Lee did all that was possible to stem the adverse tide. Three horses were shot under him—one his favorite, Nellie Gray—and then he himself was brought to the ground by a minie ball in the thigh. In the spring of 1865 he was placed in command of the cavalry corps of the army, and followed its fortunes till the end came at Appomattox, fighting daily and desperately. The selfsacri-ficing, heroic and faithful body of men—infantry, cavalry, artillery and engineers—who c
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Warren Blues—Extra Billy's men: Roll of officers and men of a famous band of Veterans. (search)
The Warren Blues—Extra Billy's men: Roll of officers and men of a famous band of Veterans. Company roll of the officers and men of the Warren Blues, Company E, and afterwards Company D, of the 49th Virginia Infantry, Extra Billy Smith's Regiment, Pegram's Brigade, Early's Division, Stonewall Jackson Corps, Army of Northern Virginia: This company was mustered into service at Front Royal, Va., on the 17th day of June, 1861, with the four first commissioned officers, to-wit: Wheatley, Manley T., captain and promoted to major in October; died in December, 1861. Jacobs, Bayley S., first lieutenant and captain; was killed at Gettysburg. Updike, John B., second lieutenant and first lieutenant, captain; wounded at Spotsylvania, 12th of May, 1864, and retired. Funkhouser, Robert D., Jr., second lieutenant, first lieutenant, captain and acting lieutenant-colonel; wounded at Winchester, 19th of September, 1864, and captured at Fort Steadman, near Petersburg, 25th of March, 1
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.69 (search)
er, wounded at Fredericksburg and died. Levi V. Vermillion, killed at Gettysburg, 1863. Crawford Vest, killed at Boonsborough, Md., 1863. John Wright, died in 1861. H. G. White, wounded at Drewry's Bluff, May 16, 1864; living. H. M. White, living. A. J. Whittaker, wounded at Williamsburg and died since the war. William M. Whittaker, living. This company was made up in Mercer County, Va. (now West Virginia), and was the first company from the county. It was continued as a part of the 24th Virginia Regiment throughout the war, and belonged to the First Brigade of the First Division, commanded by General George E. Pickett, of Longstreet's Corps. The brigade was commanded by various brigadier-generals, as follows: J. A. Early, S. P. Garland, J. L. Kemper, and W. R. (Buck) Terry. The company participated in several battles, and lost from death in battle, death from wounds and disease, about 35 per cent. of its members. H. G. White, A Member of the Company.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.70 (search)
iment in the army. His reply was, I want a division, and then said, You march here, pointing immediately to our rear, and strike him wherever you find him, if possible hold him until I join you. On my march I encountered my old schoolmate, Will Early, commanding a section of artillery. He told me they were driving us, but that he had a good position and would give him grape and canister as soon as he got in sight. (Dear, gallant Early died there.) I moved rapidly through the dense pines andEarly died there.) I moved rapidly through the dense pines and soon caught glimpses of the enemy's colors. They were marching rapidly by the flank. I immediately sent, at short intervals, three couriers (one of whom was Captain Ro. Mitchell), with orders to report to General Ransom or Colonel Mayo or General Steuart, and tell them a large body of the enemy was in our immediate rear. I would engage him at once and they could direct their march by my guns. They were between us and our wagon and ammunition trains, and I advised that the division be faced