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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.21 (search)
ieving those whose ammunition was exhausted in this unexpected engagement. After Hooker had been forced back from Fort Magruder, the threatening position of Hancock on the Confederate left was noted by the enemy, and D. H. Hill went forward with Early's brigade, Early and Hill in person leading, toward the crest where Hancock's infantry was posted. The Confederates were met by a severe musketry fire, and at length by a counter charge, led by Hancock, in which the bayonet was used in open fiEarly and Hill in person leading, toward the crest where Hancock's infantry was posted. The Confederates were met by a severe musketry fire, and at length by a counter charge, led by Hancock, in which the bayonet was used in open field. Generals Sumner, Keyes, and Smith all mentioned Hancock's victory, which was brilliant and decisive. General Smith said in his report, The brilliancy of the plan of battle, the coolness of its execution, the seizing of the proper instant for changing from the defensive to the offensive, the steadiness of the troops engaged, and the completeness of the victory, are subjects to which I earnestly call the attention of the General-in-Chief for just praise. General Keyes wrote, If Hancock ha
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Williamsburg, Va. (search)
M. Scales; 14th N. C., Col. P. W. Roberts; 3d Va., Col. Joseph Mayo. Brigade loss not separately reported. Donaldsonville (La.) Battery (3 guns), Lieut. Lestang Fortier. Fourth division, Major-Gen. Daniel H. Hill (in command on the left). Early's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Jubal A. Early (w), Col. D. K. McRae: 5th N. C., Col. D. K. McRae; 23d N. C., Col. John P. Hoke, Maj. Daniel H. Christie; 24th Va., Col. William R. Terry (w), Major Richard L. Maury; 38th Va., Lieut.-Col. Powhatan B. WhittleBrig.-Gen. Jubal A. Early (w), Col. D. K. McRae: 5th N. C., Col. D. K. McRae; 23d N. C., Col. John P. Hoke, Maj. Daniel H. Christie; 24th Va., Col. William R. Terry (w), Major Richard L. Maury; 38th Va., Lieut.-Col. Powhatan B. Whittle. Brigade loss (except 5th N. C., not reported): k, 30; w, 106; m, 70=206. Rodes's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. R. E. Rodes: 5th Ala., Col. C. C. Pegues; 6th Ala., Col. John B. Gordon; 12th Ala., Col. R. T. Jones; 12th Miss., Col. W. H. Taylor. Rains's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. G. J. Rains: 13th Ala., Col. B. D. Fry; 26th Ala., Col. E. A. O'Neal; 6th Ga., Col. A. H. Colquitt; 23d Ga., Col. Thos. Hutcherson. Featherston's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. W. S. Featherston: 27th Ga., Col. Levi B. Smith; 28th Ga., Col. T. J
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Manassas to Seven Pines. (search)
Magruder's command, thus reinforced, amounted to about 12,000. On that day General Early joined with his division from the Army of Northern Virginia. . . . . This dagruder's force was thus increased to about 20,000. The same order detached Early's, D. R. Jones's, and D. H. Hill's divisions from the Army of Northern Virginiaion not having arrived before the evacuation was made. From a narrative by General Early I make the following extract: A very valuable part of the property so lost t had, and could have, no influence upon the real event. Mr. Davis says of General Early's account of his attack upon Hancock at Williamsburg: He [Early] confidusly, the enemy's force there engaged must have been captured [II., 96]. General Early sent an officer to report that there was a battery in front of him which heurg] greatly exceeded our own, which was about 1200. He means exclusive of General Early's loss. According to General McClellan's report his loss was 2228. General
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
orge W. Wooding. Brigade loss: k, 2; w, 15; m, 1==18. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Alexander R. Lawton: 13th Ga., Col. Marcellus Douglass; 26th Ga., Col. E. N. Atkinson; 31st Ga., Col. C. A. Evans (w); 38th Ga., Lieut.-Col. L. J. Parr (w), Capt. William H. Battey; 60th Ga., Lieut.-Col. W. H. Stiles; 61st Ga., Col. John H. Lamar. Brigade loss: k, 115; w, 452 == 567. Ewell's division, Maj.-Gen. Richard S. Ewell. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Arnold Elzey (w), Col. James A. Walker, Brig.-Gen. Jubal A. Early: 12th Ga., Capt. James G. Rodgers; 13th Va., Col. James A. Walker; 25th Va., Lieut.-Col. John C. Higginbotham; 31st Va., Col. John S. Hoffman; 44th Va., Lieut.-Col. Norvell Cobb; 52d Va., Lieut.-Col. J. H. Skinner; 58th Va., Col. F. H. Board. Brigade loss: k, 52; w, 229; m, 3==284. Seventh Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Isaac R. Trimble: 15th Ala., Col. James Cantey; 21st Ga., Maj. T. W. Hooper (w); 16th Miss., Col. Carnot Posey; 21st N. C., Lieut.-Col. W. W. Kirkland; 1st N. C. Battalion Sh
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 8.58 (search)
now disposed along the northern base of the mountain, the brigades of General I. R. Trimble, Colonel H. Forno, and General J. A. Early, of Ewell's division, on the right, with those of General W. B. Taliaferro and Lieutenant-Colonel T. S. Garnett, oausted, and all his field-officers but two killed or wounded, it was relieved, after several hours of severe fighting, by Early's brigade and the 8th Louisiana regiment. General Early drove the enemy back, with heavy loss, and pursued about two hundGeneral Early drove the enemy back, with heavy loss, and pursued about two hundred yards beyond the line of battle, when he was recalled to the position of the railroad where Thomas, Pender, and Archer had firmly held their ground against every attack. While the battle was raging on Jackson's left, General Longstreet ordered querable spirit. Casting about for help, fortunately it was here reported to me that the brigades of Generals Lawton and Early were near by, and, sending to them, they promptly moved to my front at the most opportune moment, and this last charge me
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Cedar Mountain, Va.: August 9th, 1862. (search)
C., Lieut.-Col. Robert H. Gray; 34th N. C., Col. Richard H. Riddick; 38th N. C., Capt. John Ashford. Brigade. loss: k, 2; w, 11; m, 2=15. Artillery, Lieut.-Col. R. L. Walker; Va. Battery (Purcell Art'y), Capt. W. J. Pegram; Va. Battery (Middlesex Art'y), Lieut. W. B. Hardy; Va. Battery (Fredericksburg Art'y), Capt. Carter M. Braxton; N. C. Battery (Branch Art'y), Capt. A. C. Latham. Artillery loss: k, 2; w, 12 = 14. Third division, Maj.-Gen. Richard S. Ewell. Fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Jubal A. Early: 12th Ga., Capt. William F. Brown; 13th Va., Col. James A. Walker; 25th Va., Maj. John C. Higginbotham; 31st Va., Lieut.-Col. Alfred H. Jackson (w); 44th Va.,-----; 52d Va., Lieut.-Col. James H. Skinner; 58th Va., Maj. John G. Kasey. Brigade loss: k, 16; w, 145; m, 2=163. Seventh Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Isaac R. Trimble: 15th Ala., Maj. A. A. Lowther; 21st Ga.,-----; 21st N. C.,-----. Brigade loss: k, 1; w, 17=18. Eighth Brigade, Col. Henry Forno: 5th La.,-----; 6th La.,-----; 7th La.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at the Second Bull Run. August 16th-September 2d, 1862. (search)
c R. Trimble (w), Capt. W. F. Brown (k): 15th Ala., Maj. A. A. Lowther; 12th Ga., Capt. W. F. Brown; 21st Ga., Capt. Thomas C. Glover; 21st N. C., Lieut.-Col. Saunders Fulton (k); 1st N. C. Battalion,-----. Brigade loss: k, 109; w, 331; m, 7=447. Early's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Jubal A. Early: 13th Va., Col. James A. Walker; 25th Va., Col. George H. Smith (w); 31st Va., Col. John S. Hoffman; 44th Va.,-----; 49th Va., Col. William Smith; 52d Va.,-----; 58th Va.,-----. Brigade loss: k, 29; w, 187; m,Brig.-Gen. Jubal A. Early: 13th Va., Col. James A. Walker; 25th Va., Col. George H. Smith (w); 31st Va., Col. John S. Hoffman; 44th Va.,-----; 49th Va., Col. William Smith; 52d Va.,-----; 58th Va.,-----. Brigade loss: k, 29; w, 187; m, 4=220. Hays's Brigade, Col. Henry Forno (w), Col. H. B. Strong: 5th La., Maj. B. Menger; 6th La., Col. H. B. Strong; 7th La.,-----; 8th La., Maj. T. D. Lewis; 14th La.,-----. Brigade loss: k, 87; w, 263; m, 11 = 361. Artillery: Va. Battery (Staunton Art'y), Lieut. A. W. Garber; Md. Battery (Chesapeake Art'y), Capt. William D. Brown; La. Battery (La. Guard Art'y), Capt. L. E. D'Aquin; Md. Battery, Capt. W. F. Dement; Va. Battery, Capt. John R. Johnson; Va. Battery (Courtney Art'y), Capt. J. W.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Jackson's raid around Pope. (search)
o repair the wires and protect the railroad. Aroused, however, on the evening of the 27th, to some appreciation of the condition of affairs, he sent one division (Hookers) of Heintzelman's corps to Bristoe, which attacked the brigades of Lawton, Early, and Forno (Hays's) of Ewell's division, who successively retired, as they had been directed to do, with little loss, upon the main body at Manassas Junction. At his leisure, Jackson now proceeded to execute his projected movements. A. P. Hilare Gap; and the next day, before noon, Longstreet's advance, under Hood, mingled their hurrahs with those of our men. Jackson's force in this raid consisted of three divisions, as follows: Ewell's division, composed of the brigades of Lawton, Early, Hayes (Forno commanding), and Trimble, with the batteries of Brown, Dement, Latimer, Balthus, and D'Acquin; Hill's division, of the brigades of Branch, Gregg, Field, Pender, Archer, and Thomas, with the batteries of Braxton, Latham, Crenshaw, Mc
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Jackson's foot-cavalry at the Second Bull Run. (search)
beef, eked out with green corn and unripe apples, formed a diet unsuited to soldiers on the march, and there was much straggling. I fell behind several times, but managed to catch up from day to day. Once some cavalry made a dash across the river at our train; I joined a party who, like myself, were separated from their commands, and we fought the enemy until Trimble's brigade, the rearguard, came up. We were then opposite the Warrenton Springs, and were making a great show of crossing, Early's brigade having been thrown over the river where it became smartly engaged. I have since heard that this officer remonstrated more than once at the service required of him, receiving each time in reply a peremptory order from Jackson to hold his position. He finally retorted: Oh! well, old Jube can die if that's what he wants, but tell General Jackson I'll be----if this position can be held! The brigade moved off next morning, leaving me in the grip of the ague, which reported promptl
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Washington under Banks. (search)
overnment (although Congress had, in a strange freak, forbidden it), set vigorously to work to complete and extend the fortifications, particularly on the north side and beyond the eastern branch, and to clear their front by felling the timber. Heavy details of new troops were furnished daily, and the men, carefully selected, easily and cheerfully got through an immense amount of work in an incredibly short time. It was before these lines that, two years later, in his raid on Washington, Early brought up one evening; it was behind them that the dawn revealed to him the familiar Greek cross of the Sixth Army Corps, and also the four-pointed star of the Nineteenth.--R. B. I. With the aid of General Barry as chief of artillery, and, among others, of Colonel R. O. Tyler, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery, the artillerists were instructed in their duties, and with the approval of the Government a permanent garrison was provided, formed of those splendid regiments of heavy artillery,
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