Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Jubal A. Early or search for Jubal A. Early in all documents.

Your search returned 32 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.11 (search)
a mining company of New Mexico, where he made money fast and became wealthy. Another who went to Egypt was General A. W. Reynolds. He served awhile, dropped out of service, and then settled down in the country of his adoption. The careers of Early and Beauregard are well known. They lived and prospered in New Orleans, where they superintended the drawings of the Louisiana Lottery Company. General Early's death occurred in Virginia only a few months ago. He was one of the last of the greatGeneral Early's death occurred in Virginia only a few months ago. He was one of the last of the great southern generals. The latter days of General R. E. Lee's life were passed in the quiet at Lexington, in his native State, where he became an instructor of young men. The duties of a college president were faithfully carried out by him, although it was probable that the last years of his life were filled with infinite sadness. Of the remaining brilliant leaders of the Lost Cause some dropped from sight and memory, others had a quiet and prosperous old age, but few fared worse than Genera
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
ssembled, in pursuance of a call issued by General Early, as the ranking officer of the army of Norent Davis, and was addressed by Mr. Davis, General Early, General Wise, General Gordon, Colonel Preion of the Army of Northern Virginia, with General Early as its first president. How he loved thisaithful and intrepid old hero and comrade, General Early, has died. Your Executive Committee thoug by one of the best officers that served under Early, that amongst our Confederate army commanders ands glorious. Zzzpersonal qualities of General Early. Let me say something ere I say good niecutor to reveal the evidences in his hands of Early's charities, it would astonish the world; but he stoutest hearted. It was the instinct of Early's life to repress and not to express his feeli the ravages of war, which finally brought General Early back to Virginia from his self-imposed exiadopted: Resolved, That in the death of General Early it is felt that Virginia has never sustain[19 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
n of the Medical Corps of; report of Surgeon-General Jos. Jones, M. D., Ll.D., 14. Valley Campaign of 1864, The, 292. Veteran Camps at the Unveiling of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument, 347 Virginia Cavalry, 14th, Co. H; Survivors of, 74. Virginia Infantry, 15th, Co. A; Annotated Roll of, 48. Virginia, Magnanimity of, 366. Waid, Capt. James D., 21. War for the Union. Losses in its battles, 40. War Talks of Confederate Veterans, 69. Washington, D. C. Menaces by Early, 298-301. Washington Monument, Mary, 56. Waynesboroa, Battle of, 311. Weed, Thurlow, 38. Wheeler, Hon., Joseph, 24. Wilderness, Battle of the, 289. Williamsburg, Va. Battle of, June 1, 1862. Erroneous statements as to corrected, 106, 287. Wilson, R. R., 157. Winchester, Va., Battle of, 304. Winchester, Va. Confederate Dead in its Stonewall Cemetery; ladies in charge of lots, 47; Memorial Services June 6, 1894, 41. Women of all time, 56. Women of the South, 82. A