hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for W. T. Early or search for W. T. Early in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 9 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), James Louis Petigru, (search)
ly been General Lee's plan to operate west of the South Mountain range, and keep General Meade east of it, as the sending Early east of it to threaten Baltimore clearly indicates. In case the Union army crossed over in spite of his manoeuvres to prnformed in regard to the conditions he had to encounter. He must have known something of the quality of the militia, for Early's cavalry had come upon a full regiment of this militia at Gettysburg, which had dispersed so quickly that Jenkins could not get in sight of it. York had been abandoned by the military, and the municipal officers met Early several miles from the city to treat for its surrender. Again, at Wrightsville, 1,200 militia had retreated across the bridge and set fire to it, before Gordon could get his brigade in position to attack. General Early writes (p. 467): I regretted very much the failure to secure the bridge, as, finding the defenseless condition of the country generally, and the little obstacle likely to be a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General T. J. (Stonewall) Jackson, Confederate States army. (search)
He knew the fighting quality of the enemy's forces too. Let the Yankees get very close, he said to Ewell at Cross Keys, before your infantry fires, they won't stand long. I asked him at Cedar Run if he expected a battle that day. He smiled and said: Banks is in our front and he is generally willing to fight, and, he added very slowly, as if to himself, and he generally gets whipped. At Malvern Hill, when a portion of our army was beaten and to some extent demoralized, Hill and Ewell and Early came to tell him that they could make no resistance if McClellan attacked them in the morning. It was difficult to wake General Jackson, as he was exhausted and very sound asleep. I tried it myself and after many efforts partly succeeded. When he was made to understand what was wanted, he said: McClellan and his army will be gone by daylight, and went to sleep again. The generals thought him mad, but the prediction was true. At Sharpsburg, when on the 17th, our army had repulsed three
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.13 (search)
ould get nothing more to eat for more than three days. Orders to burn. Reaching my quarters in the city about 2 o'clock A. M. of the 3d, my adjutant, Linden Kent, a youth about eighteen (who afterwards became a distinguished lawyer in Washington city, and died a few years since), showed me an order from General Ewell, directing all the tobacco warehouses, then full of tobacco, to be burned at a certain signal. He and Captain Herron, of Orange, the ranking officer in my absence (Captain W. T. Early, of Albemarle, and Major James Strange, of Fluvanna, then being absent, sick), had made all the arrangements necessary to carry this order into effect. I directed Captain Herron and Adjutant Kent, so soon as the signal was given, to fire these buildings, then pass over the river on Mayo's bridge and follow the army. Being dead tired, I threw myself down to rest, fell asleep, and did not waken until the arsenal exploded. This woke me up most effectually. I threw my blanket over my
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
Hon. R. M. T. Hunter. [from the Richmond, Va., Dispatch, Dec. 5, 1897.] An address by Colonel L. Q. Washington. The monument movement Revived. Mr. Hunter's birth, education, Early environments and public life. This address was to have been read at a joint meeting of the R. M. T. Hunter Monument Association and the Board of Supervisors of Essex county, appointed to be held at Tappahannock on the 24th of September, but which, owing to unavoidable causes, had to be postponed until the 20th of December. The address. Gentlemen—Some six years ago, in the town of Fredericksburg, I had the honor to preside over a meeting composed of influential citizens of this Commonwealth, when the initial steps were taken to organize an association for the purpose of removing the remains of the Hon. R. M. T. Hunter from their place of burial in Essex county, Virginia, to the capital of the State, at Richmond, and of erecting a monument at the tomb; and also of arranging such other tes
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Malvern HillJuly 1, 1862. (search)
General Magruder not mistaken the order, or had there been only one road known by that name? I am unable to say; and not having been educated a soldier, I do not presume to criticise. With the knowledge of the roads and the country, gained since that time, and the experience of the years after the battle, I will venture to say that had Magruder followed on the Willis church road and the (Federal map) Quaker road, and occupied the position of D. H. Hill, so that that officer, together with Early and Ewell, could have extended our left until it encircled Malvern Hill, the enemy would have been taken in flank and forced to give battle on ground more advantageous to us, or to make his retreat over the single road across Turkey Island creek. The depositions of three intelligent citizens and soldiers of Henrico county, sworn to before R. H. Nelson, a magistrate, then and afterwards a member of my cavalry company, and now living on Frazier's Farm, in Henrico county, can be seen in the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A horror of the war. [from the Richmond, Va., times, March 14, 1897.] (search)
r, they did not fail to recall the names of those who had fallen in the fight, but especially the six soldiers, who, after being taken prisoners, had been made the victims of the implacable ferocity of General George A. Custer, of Sheridan's cavalry. A committee was appointed to raise funds for the erection of a monument to these soldiers, and their appeal is published below. The story of this tragedy is thus told in the Warrenton True Index, by an eye-witness: After the defeat of General Early at the battle of Opequon, on September 19, 1864, his command fell back up the Valley. The brigade of cavalry, under General Wickham, occupied a strong position at Milford, twelve miles south of Front Royal, and Custer made repeated efforts to force him from the position, without effect. About this time it was reported to Captain Chapman, of Mosby's command, that a large wagon train was en route from Milford to Winchester, under the escort of a small body of men. He immediately made di
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
lly resisted them, but the enemy continued to make attacks until nightfall. Next morning, as Longstreet was relieving Hill, the enemy made an attack which at first created some confusion, but as soon as the troops recovered themselves, the enemy was driven back with spirit rarely surpassed. At night an attack was made against the enemy, and they being panic stricken by the cheering of the Confederate army, a stampede was begun, which led to a general rout. The third army corps under General Early (Hill being unwell), left the position at the Wilderness, May 8, 1864, and engaged in the great battles of Spotsylvania Court House when the 38th lost several brave men. The regiment was in the attack made by General Hill on General Warren, at Noel's station, May 23d, and the skirmishing at Riddle's shop, June 13th, and on down to Petersburg which was reached June 18th. The following is a resolution of the Confederate Congress, May 17, 1864: The Congress of the Confederate State
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
ed in high terms of praise in an official order from division headquarters. The loss of the regiment in the engagements of the 5th and 6th was exceedingly heavy; a large proportion of its officers were killed and wounded; amongst the latter the major of the regiment. Both officers and men won the special commendation of brigade and division commanders. On the 8th the regiment moved with the brigade towards Spotsylvania Courthouse. On the 10th Heth's and Anderson's divisions, commanded by Early, had a serious conflict with a portion of Grant's army, which was attempting to flank General Lee by what was called the Po River road. In this engagement the 44th suffered severely and fought with its accustomed valor. Captain J. J. Crump, of Co. E, elicited by his conduct warm commendation from the General commanding. Spotsylvania Court House. On the 12th the regiment was assigned its position directly in front of Spotsylvania Court House, and was in support of a strong force of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
Crutchfield's Artillery Brigade; Operations of April, 1865, 38, 139, 285. Cumberland Grays, 21st Va. Infantry, Roster and Record of, 264. Custer, Gen., Geo. A., 239. Danville, Explosion at, April, 1865, 271. Davis, Pres't, Jefferson, 69; at Manassas, 94. Davis, Sam, A Southern Hero, Tribute to by Ella Wheeler Wilcox, 231. Deloney, Col. W. G., 147. Drewry's Bluff, Battle of, 206. Duke, Col. R. T. W., 138. Duncan, Col. R. P., 17. Early, Gen. Jubal A., 109, 153. Early, Capt. W. T., 135. Ennals, Bartholomew, 181. Ewell Gen. R. S., 40, 105. Ezekiel, H. T., 297. Farrar, Judge F. R., 364. Fayette Artillery, in the Movement on New Berne, N. C., 288. Federal Forces, Total of the, 303. Five Forks, Battle of, 16. Fitzhugh, Maj. P. H., killed, 14. Fleming, Robt. I., 355. Fleming, W. L, 45. Flowers, Col., Geo. W.. 245. Forrest, Gen. N. B.. Ability of, 45, 54. Frayser, Capt R. E.,369. Frazier's Farm, Battle of 98, 209, 211. Fredericksburg, Ba