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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for N. J. Eaton or search for N. J. Eaton in all documents.

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his father. his Maternal grandfather. boyhood and early friends. character as a boy. anecdote. his schools. Transylvania. desire to enter the Navy. visit to Louisiana. his brothers. vigor of early settlers of Kentucky. sketch of Josiah Stoddard Johnston. his distinguished career. his generosity to his brothers. return of A. S. Johnston to Transylvania. appointment to United States military Academy. kindness to animals. formation of character. illustrative anecdotes. Captain Eaton's account of entrance at West point. his conduct there. testimony of his fellow-cadets. singular occurrence at his graduation. assignment to Second infantry. Intimacy with Leonidas Polk. His friends at West point. Albert Sidney Johnston was born on the 2d of February, 1803, in the village of Washington, Mason County, Kentucky. He was the youngest son of Dr. John Johnston, a physician, and one of the early settlers of that town. Dr. Johnston's father, Archibald Johnston, was a
Captain N. J. Eaton. These articles are not here inserted, because it is believed that the events of the campaign as narrated are a sufficient reply to cavil. It is, indeed, alluded to only because it drew from General Johnston a letter to Captain Eaton, already quoted, of October 11, 1858, from which it is thought proper to make further extracts in response to the following charge by his critic: We propose directing attention to the claims of an individual who has won rank and, perhap obstinate immobility for eight or nine months. General Johnston contented himself with a simple statement of the circumstances as the best refutation of the strictures of the letterwriter. The rest of his letter is as follows: my dear Eaton: I received your letter of the 3d inst., and have now the pleasure to acknowledge the great obligations under which you have placed me, and to express my grateful sense of your generous conduct in defending an absent friend from an unjust and unf